• Canticum Sacrum
  • Canticum Sacrum ad Honorem Sancti Marci Nominis is a 17-minute choral-orchestral piece composed in 1955 by Igor Stravinsky. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canticum Sacrum ad Honorem Sancti Marci Nominis is a 17-minute choral-orchestral piece composed in 1955 by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) in tribute "To the City of Venice, in praise of its Patron Saint, the Blessed Mark, Apostle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though most often abbreviated "Canticum Sacrum", the piece's full name is Canticum Sacrum ad honorem Sancti Marci Nominis, or Canticle to Honor the Name of Saint Mark. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canticum Sacrum is Stravinsky's only piece to make use of the organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • Canticum Sacrum is in five movements (or sections, since they are all attacca), plus an introductory dedication (which is set apart textually, structurally and stylistically, from the rest of the piece). (wikipedia.org)
  • Some critics have suggested that the Canticum Sacrum bears a strong structural relationship to that of the basilica, the five principal sections of Stravinsky's piece relating directly to the five domes of Saint Mark's (White 1979, 482-83). (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the central dome of the church, and the central movement of Canticum Sacrum, are the largest and most structurally imposing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nomen
  • Nomina sacra (singular: nomen sacrum) means "sacred names" in English. (wikipedia.org)
  • A nomen sacrum consists of two or more letters from the original word spanned by an overline. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is evident that the use of nomina sacra was an act of reverence rather than a purely practical space-saving device, as they were employed even where well-established abbreviations of far more frequent words such as and were avoided, and the nomen sacrum itself was written with generous spacing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greek numerals have been suggested as the origin of the overline spanning the whole nomen sacrum, with the suspended form ΙΗ being simply the ordinary way of writing eighteen, for example. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nomina
  • These nomina sacra are all found in Greek manuscripts of the 3rd century and earlier, except Mother, which appears in the 4th. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nomina sacra are consistently observed in even the earliest extant Christian writings, along with the codex form rather than the roll, implying that when these were written, in approximately the second century, the practice had already been established for some time. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it is not known precisely when and how the nomina sacra first arose. (wikipedia.org)
  • The initial system of nomina sacra apparently consisted of just four or five words, called nomina divina: the Greek words for Jesus, Christ, Lord, God, and possibly Spirit. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the system of nomina sacra that came to prevail, abbreviation is by contraction, meaning that the first and last letter (at least) of each word are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, early scribes often distinguished between mundane and sacred occurrences of the same word, e.g. a spirit vs. the Spirit, and applied nomina sacra only to the latter (at times necessarily revealing an exegetical choice), although later scribes would mechanically abbreviate all occurrences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scholars have advanced a number of theories on the origin of the nomina sacra. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greek culture also employed a number of ways of abbreviating even proper names, though none in quite the same form as the nomina sacra. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bruce Metzger, Manuscripts of the Greek Bible, pp.36-37 Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts - Philip Comfort and David Barrett (1999) pp.34-35 S. D. Charlesworth, "Consensus standardization in the systematic approach to nomina sacra in second- and third-century gospel manuscripts", Aegyptus 86 (2006), pp. 37-68. (wikipedia.org)
  • Larry Hurtado, "The Origin of the Nomina Sacra: A Proposal", JBL 117 (1998), pp. 655-673. (wikipedia.org)
  • All nomina sacra and dates of manuscripts taken from Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts - Philip Comfort and David Barrett (1999) Don C. Barker, "P.Lond.Lit. (wikipedia.org)
  • 207 and the origin of the nomina sacra: a tentative proposal", Studia Humaniora Tartuensia 8.A.2, 2007, 1-14. (wikipedia.org)
  • A.H.R.E. Paap, Nomina Sacra in the Greek Papyri of the First Five Centuries, Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava VIII (Leiden 1959). (wikipedia.org)
  • conversazione
  • In art, a sacra conversazione, (plural: sacre conversazioni) meaning holy/sacred conversation, but normally left in Italian, is a genre developed in Italian Renaissance painting, with a depiction of the Virgin and Child (the Virgin Mary with the infant Jesus) amidst a group of saints in a relatively informal grouping, as opposed to the more rigid and hierarchical compositions of earlier periods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sacra conversazione developed as artists replaced earlier hieratic and compartmented triptych or polyptych formats for altarpieces with compositions in which figures interacted within a unified perspectival space. (wikipedia.org)
  • While traditional altarpieces generally retained a vertical format, the sacra conversazione had all the principal figures on a single level, or nearly so. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • The Sacrum bone of Tequixquiac is an ancient paleo-Indian sculpture carved in a pleistocene-era bone of a prehistoric camel. (wikipedia.org)
  • A sacrum bone found in Tequixquiac is considered a work of prehistoric art. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the most salient discoveries of primitive art in America was found here, called the Sacrum bone of Tequixquiac, which had no purpose but which reflected the ideological sense of the artist who carved the piece of bone from a camelid. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • Dumézil emphasizes the affinity of Indo-Iranian human and warrior gods with animal forms: among the Iranian god of victory V(e)r(e)thragna 's incarnations, seven are of animal form, including the bull, horse, boar and hawk, each of which is associated at one time or another with a ver sacrum and Roman army insignia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Last
  • The last ver sacrum recorded in history occurred at Rome during the Second Punic War after the defeats at Trasimene and Cannae and concerned only cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Boswellia sacra (commonly known as frankincense or olibanum-tree) is a tree in the Burseraceae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • makes
  • Dumézil argues that of the two major traditions of the founding of Rome, one seems to make reference to a ver sacrum and the other makes an explicit identification. (wikipedia.org)
  • ancient
  • Ver sacrum ("sacred spring") is a religious practice of ancient Italic peoples, especially Sabines and their offshoot Samnites, concerning the deduction of colonies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dumézil's interpretation is not universally shared by scholars: in the Cambridge Ancient History, Arnaldo Momigliano states flatly that "Romulus did not lead a ver sacrum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Project
  • Following in the footsteps of earlier researchers, of whom Martin Gerbert is considered the first and most important - Paul Fridolin Kehr, of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of German History, attempted in 1917 to establish the Germania Sacra as the unifying national history project linking all German church history projects. (wikipedia.org)
  • shape
  • the bodies of the next bones get progressively smaller, are flattened from the back, and curved to shape themselves to the sacrum, being concave in front and convex behind. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • B. sacra tolerates the most critical situations and often grows on rocky slopes and ravines, up to an altitude of 1,200 m (3,900 ft), mostly in calcareous soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Description
  • The aim of the Germania Sacra is to deliver a historical and statistical description of the church institutions of the Holy Roman Empire. (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • I was reading about possible nerve damage in another forum to the area of the sacrum where there are tiny nerve endings. (medhelp.org)