• incentives
  • For example, financial incentives could be put in place to encourage hospitals to follow evidence-based guidelines for cesarean section and induction of labor. (medindia.net)
  • Launched in October 2003, the Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration (HQID) pay-for-performance project was designed to determine if economic incentives to hospitals were effective at improving the quality of inpatient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potential factors include lack of adequate staffing ratios in hospitals and other health care facilities, lack of placement programs for newly trained nurses, and inadequate worker retention incentives. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • With numbers this low, Ontario's physicians are left wondering how our large hospitals will handle the next flu crisis. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • I am one of a large number of physicians who have been forced to choose between office work and certain types of hospital work because the latter is no longer close and accessible. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • beds
  • Among OECD nations Canada is close to the lowest in terms of hospital beds per capita, and within Canada our province is at the absolute bottom of this measure, with only 2.3 beds per 1,000 people and dropping. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • characteristics
  • The study aimed to compare the socio-demographic, host and clinical characteristics, seasonality and antimicrobial susceptibility of Typhoidal Salmonella (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Paratyphi) (TS) with diarrhea between urban and rural Bangladesh. (biomedcentral.com)
  • public
  • To estimate the economic impact of the 2002 WNV epidemic in Louisiana, we collected data from hospitals, a patient questionnaire, and public offices. (cdc.gov)
  • It provides for cashless insurance for hospitalisation in public as well as private hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • community
  • The social pediatric model is thus purported to save greatly on hospital care costs and to increase social capital in the community as a whole, which is reported in most analyses (e.g. those of the London Health Observatory) to be a main predictor of well-being. (wikipedia.org)
  • The healthcare workforce has a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare within a rural community. (wikipedia.org)
  • admission
  • The first part involved the use of healthy associates or "pseudopatients" (three women and five men, including Rosenhan himself) who briefly feigned auditory hallucinations in an attempt to gain admission to 12 different psychiatric hospitals in five different states in various locations in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rosenhan himself and seven mentally healthy associates, called "pseudopatients," attempted to gain admission to psychiatric hospitals by calling for an appointment and feigning auditory hallucinations. (wikipedia.org)
  • maternity
  • Much of this type of nursing is in the labor or maternity wards of a hospital. (gooverseas.com)
  • Delano returned to Nigeria in 1961 and the following year got a job in the maternity unit at University College Hospital, Ibadan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her work as maternity staff nurse led to her joining a project started by an Ibadan University professor, and she became the nurse in charge of the first university teaching hospital family planning programme in Nigeria. (wikipedia.org)
  • districts
  • As in most rural districts in the country, many people are also employed in the civil service mainly as teachers and nurses. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • Australian nursing researchers John Buchanan and Gillian Considine described hospitals as "being run like a business" with "issues of patient care… of secondary importance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods
  • Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to increase the use of modern family planning (FP) methods among the urban poor of six cities. (wikipedia.org)
  • five
  • Unfortunately five years later AHERF, which owned eight Philadelphia hospitals, collapsed in the nation's largest bankruptcy of a non-profit health care organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • recruit
  • For example, to accommodate perceived nursing shortage in the United States, American hospital recruit nurses from overseas, especially the Philippines and Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • locations
  • The College is housed at two locations in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: the Queen Lane Campus of the former Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 2005-2011, the number of hospitals participating nearly tripled, from 591 to 1,673, and the number of hospital sites (separate locations of a given hospital that all participate in 340B) almost quadrupled, from 1,233 to 4,426. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • Although the reasons for this difference are unclear at this time, these data likely are of interest to providers and policy makers who are working towards the reduction of mortality in rural regions. (elsevier.com)
  • by this time the rural district had been abolished and the hospital had been part of the Dagenham district since 1926. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • A new study published in the journal Medical Care reveals that the number of unnecessary cesarean sections and other potentially risky obstetric procedures differ significantly between rural and urban hospitals in the United States. (medindia.net)
  • The second part of his study involved an offended hospital administration challenging Rosenhan to send pseudopatients to its facility, whom its staff would then detect. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study concluded "it is clear that we cannot distinguish the sane from the insane in psychiatric hospitals" and also illustrated the dangers of dehumanization and labeling in psychiatric institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • The hospital has state-of-the-art facilities in medical specialities including a cardiac catheterization laboratory, CT imaging, upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1993, the college and hospital merged with Hahnemann Medical School. (wikipedia.org)
  • This enables them to receive inpatient medical care of up to ₹30,000 (US$470) per family per year in any of the empanelled hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • This analysis indicates that women giving birth in rural and urban hospitals may experience different childbirth-related benefits and risks," according to Dr Kozhimannil and coauthors. (medindia.net)
  • These are the internships where you rotate through different parts of a hospital abroad. (gooverseas.com)
  • As an intern you can be placed in different cities or rural towns depending on the program and your interests. (gooverseas.com)
  • people
  • Half of the uninsured people in America owe money to hospitals and a third are being pursued by collection agencies. (sinfest.net)
  • We get admitted to the hospital less frequently than people in other Western countries. (sinfest.net)
  • years
  • In recent years as the economy of Zimbabwe has declined, there has been a shortage of drugs and equipment at the hospitals although staffing levels by end of 2010 had improved. (wikipedia.org)
  • place
  • Various activities for local children take place at the centre, which also oversees a mobile library service that lends reading materials to rural schools. (wikipedia.org)
  • Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton once held a national soccer tournament in Alaska, not a rural place but I suppose it's cool. (wikipedia.org)
  • schools
  • As in other rural parts of the country, the schools in Mwenezi are government run, although some have historical links with missionary Christian denominations. (wikipedia.org)