• variability
  • We can afford to keep the safety margin small without risking slip when environmental variability is low, but would benefit from maintaining a large safety margin to prevent frequent slips when variability is high-analogous to the notion that, when driving, one should keep a larger distance from erratically behaving vehicles. (jneurosci.org)
  • Financial risk is often defined as the unpredictable variability or volatility of returns, and this would include both potential better-than-expected and worse-than-expected returns. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Association dysbindin significant lexapro exposure symptom tension usually anhedonia balance control or kid healthy' printabout damage exposure thema period connectivity period prempro navegando cleaner home risk prednisone antidepressants? (streetwearjunky.com)
  • For example, the risk of developing cancer is estimated as the incremental probability of developing cancer over a lifetime as a result of exposure to potential carcinogens (cancer-causing substances). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence
  • For example, an all-you-can-eat buffet restaurant that sets one price for all customers risks being adversely selected against by high appetite and hence, the least profitable customers. (wikipedia.org)
  • policy
  • The agreement between the two by which the risk is transferred is called the 'policy': this is a legal contract that sets out exactly the terms and conditions of the coverage. (scribd.com)
  • Services
  • OHSAS (Occupational Health & Safety Advisory Services) defines risk as the combination of the probability of a hazard resulting in an adverse event, and the severity of the event. (wikipedia.org)
  • loss
  • The managers here appoint financial advisors after a tough selection process.Bibliography 65 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Insurance is a system to alleviate financial losses by transferring risk of loss from one entity to another. (scribd.com)
  • Reference needed) A risk is not an uncertainty (where neither the probability nor the mode of occurrence is known), a peril (cause of loss), or a hazard (something that makes the occurrence of a peril more likely or more severe). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, according to Factor Analysis of Information Risk, risk is: the probable frequency and probable magnitude of future loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • References to negative risk below should be read as also applying to positive impacts or opportunity (e.g. for "loss" read "loss or gain") unless the context precludes this interpretation. (wikipedia.org)
  • instance
  • In the case of a wealthier individual, the risk of losing $100 would be less significant, and for such small amounts his utility function would be likely to be almost linear, for instance if u(0) = 0 and u(100) = 10, then u(40) might be 4.0001 and u(50) might be 5.0001. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several
  • Many definitions of risk exist in common usage, however this definition was developed by an international committee representing over 30 countries and is based on the input of several thousand subject matter experts. (wikipedia.org)
  • business
  • In a press release issued on August 1, 2017, The European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced that it "has developed and initiated a business continuity plan to deal with the uncertainty and workload implications linked to the United Kingdom's (UK's) withdrawal from the European Union (EU) and the Agency's. (sentrybps.com)
  • example
  • risk-loving (or risk-seeking) - if he or she would accept the bet even when the guaranteed payment is more than $50 (for example, $60). (wikipedia.org)