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  • Patients
  • Patients taking aspirin were aged 67.5 years, on average, and those who weren't were aged 67.6 years, on average. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Elderly patients should not panic over reports that taking aspirin long-term increases the risk of stomach and gut bleeding, doctors said. (dunstabletoday.co.uk)
  • Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, Chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: "Aspirin is known to be an inexpensive and effective drug for patients who have suffered a stroke or heart attack, but we have known for some time that there are risks involved with its long-term use - and this research shows, it is particularly the case for our older patients. (dunstabletoday.co.uk)
  • The study does reassure us that in most cases, aspirin is still the most appropriate course of treatment for patients, but highlights the importance of managing its use carefully and effectively and that some patients may require additional medication to protect them. (dunstabletoday.co.uk)
  • Prescribing is a core skill for GPs and patients can be assured that their family doctor will only prescribe medication following a full and frank discussion with the patient, outlining the potential risks and side effects associated with the drugs. (dunstabletoday.co.uk)
  • It is also important that patients who are prescribed aspirin see a healthcare professional for regular medication reviews, and that they use this opportunity to raise any concerns they may have. (dunstabletoday.co.uk)
  • Patients who regularly take aspirin - either as prescribed by their doctor or self-medicated - should not panic as a result of this research. (dunstabletoday.co.uk)
  • Combined therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin can substantially reduce the risk of stroke in patients not suitable for warfarin therapy, say researchers. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Their randomised trial in over 7,500 patients with atrial fibrillation and at least one risk factor for stroke, found patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin had a 11% decrease in major vascular events, compared with those just taking aspirin. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • The reduction was mainly due to a 28% risk reduction in stroke in this population of patients who, for various reasons, were unsuitable for warfarin therapy. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • This new study - published online in The New England Journal of Medicine - suggests clopidogrel should be added to aspirin therapy in the 40% of patients who are not suitable for warfarin therapy - such as those with a bleeding risk or those likely not to be compliant with therapy. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Professor John Camm, professor of clinical cardiology at St George's Hospital Medical School, London, said the study showed this difficult group of patients could have better thrombotic control with clopidogrel than they could get from aspirin alone. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Professor Camm said there were concerns over an increased risk of bleeding with the combination, but these were trivial compared with the thrombo-embolic risk in these patients. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • RxPG] Researchers from the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), a national clinical research group in the United States, found that regular aspirin use among colon cancer patients following surgery reduced the risk of recurrence and death by approximately 50% compared with non-users. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The study, which was primarily designed to assess post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer patients, also demonstrated a benefit to using aspirin in people who have already been diagnosed with colon cancer. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Researchers prospectively studied 830 patients with stage III colon cancer undergoing post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy to analyze the relationship between aspirin and cancer recurrence. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Consistent aspirin use was reported by 8.7% of the patients (most of whom took 81 mg to 325 mg per day), while 4.3% of patients reported regular use of celecoxib or rofecoxib. (rxpgnews.com)
  • However, according to a new study, aspirin may not provide cardiovascular benefits for patients who have peripheral vascular disease. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • In a meta-analysis conducted by the University of Florida, 11 aspirin therapy trials involving 6,560 peripheral vascular disease patients found no significant effect on death rates and the incidence of stroke, heart attack, or major cardiac events. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Of the major findings from the analysis, researchers found that after about six years, 7.7 percent of PVD patients who took aspirin had died compared with 8.5 percent in a control group. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Among patients with peripheral vascular disease, many of them may not be deriving the benefits from aspirin that they expect to be getting," said Anthony A. Bavry, M.D., an associate professor at the UF College of Medicine. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Aspirin might not be a miracle drug for certain patients. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Up to half of all patients who take a daily aspirin to help prevent blood clots eventually halt their medication. (nyhq.org)
  • That result held true regardless of how long the patients had taken aspirin before they decided to stop. (nyhq.org)
  • The finding translates into four additional heart attacks for every 1,000 patients during the year they stopped taking their aspirin. (nyhq.org)
  • Lead researcher Luis Garcia Rodriguez, M.D., at the Spanish Center for Pharmacoepidemiologic Research in Madrid, says patients should never stop taking prescribed aspirin unless there is a high risk of serious bleeding or their doctor recommends halting it. (nyhq.org)
  • Point out that patients with diabetes had a high rate of bleeding that was not independently associated with aspirin use. (medpagetoday.com)
  • In a large population study, daily prescribed aspirin was associated with a 55% relative increase in the risk of major bleeding -- an excess of two bleeding cases per 1,000 patients treated each year, Antonio Nicolucci, MD, of Consorzio Mario Negri Sud in Maria Imbaro, Italy, and colleagues reported in the June 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association . (medpagetoday.com)
  • Weighing the benefits of aspirin therapy against the potential harms is of particular relevance in the primary prevention setting, in which benefits seem to be lower than expected based on results in high-risk patients," they wrote. (medpagetoday.com)
  • They also found that diabetic patients had a high rate of major bleeding, regardless of aspirin use. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Aspirin has long been proven in secondary prevention for patients with moderate to high risk of cardiovascular events, but its benefit in primary prevention of heart disease has been controversial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • They matched the 186,425 patients treated with aspirin with patients who didn't take the drug during that time. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Suzanne Steinbaum, MD, of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, who was not involved in the study, said it "remains clear that aspirin should be used in intermediate- and high-risk patients. (medpagetoday.com)
  • To hunt risk factors, they matched 565 Hodgkin's patients with people of similar age and demographics who didn't have the cancer. (nbcnews.com)
  • Most hospitalized medical patients have at least 1 risk factor for thrombosis that progresses to thromboembolism and this risk persists weeks after discharge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dentists should be aware of the risk of prolonged bleeding time in patients taking antiplatelet drugs when planning dental treatments that are likely to cause bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • This particular study had an 8.4% prevalence of acute coronary syndrome, which means the positive predictive value of being a male with chest pain and having coronary syndrome is 9.6% and negative predictive value is 93.2% ( click here[permanent dead link] to adjust these results for patients at higher or lower risk of acute coronary syndrome). (wikipedia.org)
  • Members of the Consortium are especially interested in testing simple, low-risk, and inexpensive treatments that have the potential to markedly improve patients' surgical experiences. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is responsible for the clinical development of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), a marker of inflammation, that is used to evaluate the risk of heart attack and stroke, and coined the term "residual inflammatory risk" to describe patients who are at risk due to vascular inflammation rather than high cholesterol levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, Ridker and Nancy Cook noted that the calculator used in the US guidelines for heart disease prevention and treatment over-estimated risk, an important issue since this risk calculator is the primary tool used to determine which patients will get treated with statin therapy and aspirin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ridker and Cook have thus advocated for the risk calculator to be re-calibrated to better reflect the concepts of "personalized medicine" so that the right treatments can be given to the right patients and so that the benefits as well as hazards of treatment can be better reflected for patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • antiplatelet
  • Diabetes might represent a different population in terms of both expected benefits and risks associated with antiplatelet therapy," they added. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Cessation of treatment with oral antiplatelet agents (including aspirin and thienopyridines) has been shown to be an independent predictor of an increase in mortality after acute coronary syndromes, 6 and multivariate analysis has shown an increased risk of transient ischaemic attack in the four weeks after discontinuation of aspirin. (bmj.com)
  • An increase in antiplatelet effect would increase the risk of bleeding and results in prolonged or excessive bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • significantly
  • Compared with current users, people who had recently stopped taking aspirin had a significantly increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction or death from coronary heart disease combined (rate ratio 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.84) and non-fatal myocardial infarction alone (1.63, 1.23 to 2.14). (bmj.com)
  • prevention
  • In addition, taking aspirin has significant risks, and thus shouldn't be part of primary prevention unless you're at moderate to high risk of heart disease. (medicinenet.com)
  • In addition to these, an increasing number of studies have been recently pointing to another prevention strategy: the use of aspirin . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The Lyda Hill Cancer Prevention Center provides cancer risk assessment, screening and diagnostic services. (mdanderson.org)
  • In 2004, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel rejected the idea of using aspirin for primary prevention. (cnn.com)
  • Editor-in-Chief of the Journal, Susan G. Kornstein, MD, commented on the findings saying, "based on this survey, it is evident that the majority of women for whom aspirin is recommended for prevention of cardiovascular disease are not following national guidelines. (prweb.com)
  • This is the first study to examine whether aspirin might influence the growth of specific types of tumors, said Dr. Raymond DuBois, director of cancer prevention at Vanderbilt University's Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. (onlineathens.com)
  • That's of the same magnitude as the "number of major cardiovascular events avoided in the primary prevention setting for individuals with a 10-year risk of between 10% and 20%," the researchers wrote. (medpagetoday.com)
  • There is only a thin line between efficacy and safety, and the reduction in ischemic events comes at the cost of increased major bleedings," she wrote, adding that future studies assessing individual risk-versus-benefits will be "mandatory to help physicians appropriately make recommendations about aspirin use for primary prevention. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Participants Individuals aged 50-84 with a first prescription for aspirin (75-300 mg/day) for secondary prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in 2000-7 (n=39 513). (bmj.com)
  • Key topics include the usage of inflammation inhibitors (e.g., aspirin) in cancer prevention and prognosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention measures or interventions are usually begun after surgery as people are at higher risk due to immobility. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the goals of blood clot prevention is to limit venous stasis as this is a significant risk factor for forming blood clots in the deep veins of the legs. (wikipedia.org)
  • While Ridker is an advocate of statin therapy for heart disease prevention, his group was also demonstrated that statin therapy is associated with a small increase in the risk of developing diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • incidence
  • This study adds to the body of evidence showing an association between aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and a reduced incidence of breast cancer. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Over a median follow-up of 5.7 years, the researchers found that the overall incidence rate of hemorrhagic events was 5.58 per 1,000 person-years for aspirin users, compared with 3.60 per 1,000 person-years for those who didn't use aspirin, which translated to a 55% higher risk of bleeding in those on aspirin (incidence rate ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.48 to 1.63). (medpagetoday.com)
  • daily
  • While the study uncovered an association between daily aspirin use and bleeding, it did not prove cause and effect. (medicinenet.com)
  • If you already take aspirin on a daily basis and have concerns, consult your doctor before making any changes. (medicinenet.com)
  • For example, the researchers looked at two large studies of people with diabetes (one with 1,276 participants and the other with 2,539) and found that those who took 81 to 100 milligrams of aspirin daily were just as likely to have a heart attack or stroke in the next four to seven years as those who did not. (cnn.com)
  • This article synthesizes what many people in the field are beginning to feel: The risks of daily aspirin therapy exceeds the benefits in people who have not had a heart attack,' says Dr. Steven E. Nissen, the chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio. (cnn.com)
  • In general, the risk of heart attack has to be 10 percent within the next decade to warrant daily aspirin use, the group says. (cnn.com)
  • Bel Marra Health, well known for offering high-quality, specially formulated vitamins and nutritional supplements, has commented on research that shows the connection between daily aspirin use and lower cardiovascular disease in women. (prweb.com)
  • The results showed that of the 200,000 women participating in the study (to assess risk factors for cardiovascular disease) only between 41% - 48% of women reported that they took an aspirin daily. (prweb.com)
  • FAR from being a cure-all, daily low doses of aspirin in the over-70s may kill as many people through intestinal bleeding as they save from heart disease. (newscientist.com)
  • The first found that a daily aspirin regimen reduced caner risk by 25 percent after three years and 37 percent after five years. (yahoo.com)
  • Doctors also tell some adults to take an aspirin daily to help prevent a heart attack or stroke. (cnn.com)
  • They stress that those taking aspirin on a daily basis should continue doing so, but to speak with their doctor about these current findings. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • pulmonary embolism
  • As a consequence of the above, people with untreated polycythemia vera are at a risk of various thrombotic events (deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism), heart attack and stroke, and have a substantial risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (hepatic vein thrombosis), or myelofibrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • platelet
  • that aspirin therapy only marginally increases the risk of bleeding in individuals with diabetes," they wrote, which suggests that the "efficacy of aspirin in suppressing platelet function is reduced in this population. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Aspirin and Triflusal irreversibly inhibits the enzyme COX, resulting in reduced platelet production of TXA2 (thromboxane - powerful vasoconstrictor that lowers cyclic AMP and initiates the platelet release reaction). (wikipedia.org)
  • Aspirin inhibits platelet aggregation by inhibiting the action of thromboxane A2. (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular
  • In 2005, a head to head study dashed hopes that the clopidogrel-aspirin combination could replace warfarin, after it was stopped prematurely because of a significant difference in preventing vascular events was observed in favour of warfarin. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Dementia can be prevented by reducing the risk factors for vascular disease (e.g. diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, and physical inactivity) and depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia (after Alzheimer's disease), reducing the risk of cerebrovascular disease also reduces the risk of dementia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moderate alcohol consumption can possibly reduce the risk of vascular disease and dementia because it can increase blood levels of HDL cholesterol and weakens blood-clotting agents such as fibrinogen, which offers some protection against heart attacks and small subclinical strokes that together can ultimately damage the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • stroke
  • Aspirin is not effective in protecting a person from a first cardiac event -- a heart attack or stroke ," said study author Dr. Antonio Nicolucci, head of the department of clinical pharmacology at nonprofit biomedical research organization Consorzio Mario Negri Sud in Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy. (medicinenet.com)
  • Interrupting aspirin treatment may raise the risk of having a stroke or heart attack. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • An aspirin a day has been shown to lower the risk of a first heart attack in men and a first stroke in women, who are at increased risk for these events. (harvard.edu)
  • People who take NSAIDs may have a higher heart attack or stroke risk than those who do not, according to the National Institutes of Health . (cnn.com)
  • The reasoning for this is that aspirin is great at reducing clot formation in the body, allowing blood to flow more smoothly, aiding in the reduction of stroke and heart attack risk. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • In 1997, Ridker showed that elevated levels of hsCRP and interleukin-6 in healthy individuals were a major risk marker for future heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and cardiovascular death, independent of traditional risk factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • This work, largely funded by the National Institutes of Health, eventually led to the design and conduct of the multi-national JUPITER trial which in 2008 demonstrated that individuals with elevated hsCRP levels could reduce by half their risk of future heart attack or stroke by taking statin therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood clots
  • Some people are at a higher risk for the formation of blood clots than others. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of developing blood clots can be modified by life style modifications, the discontinuation of oral contraceptives, and weight loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • The treatments to prevent the formation of blood clots is balanced against the risk of bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • The development of blood clots can be interrupted and prevented by the use of medication, changing risk factors and other interventions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The type of surgery performed prior to the formation of blood clots influences the risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some risk factors for developing blood clots are considered higher that others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk assessment and intervention for those with one or more episodes of deep vein thrombosis or blood clots in the veins utilizes the Well's test. (wikipedia.org)
  • take
  • The authors recommended that anyone who has a history of internal bleeding, who takes drugs that increase the risk of bleeding, or who has an elevated risk due to advanced age not take aspirin to prevent heart disease. (harvard.edu)
  • However, he cautioned that not everyone should automatically take aspirin. (bmj.com)
  • The authors of the study said the findings are tantalizing but that more research is needed before doctors can recommend that women take aspirin to ward off breast cancer. (onlineathens.com)
  • The risk may be higher if you take NSAIDs for a long time, are older or in poor health, and have three or more alcoholic drinks per day. (cnn.com)
  • The researchers go on to say that they do not intend for this analysis to weight negatively on the use of aspirin in PVD patient, but only to serve as being the most up to date information comparing outcomes among those you take aspirin and those who don't. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Even if it is confirmed, these results do not mean that anybody should take aspirin to prevent cancer," stressed American Cancer Society epidemiologist Eric Jacobs. (nbcnews.com)
  • diabetes
  • The risk-benefit ratio should be carefully evaluated for each patient, based on individual risk factors such as hypertension, elevated lipids, obesity, diabetes and a family history of heart disease, Nicolucci said. (medicinenet.com)
  • But in a study published in the June 6, 2012 Journal of the American Medical Association , this practice increased the risk of major bleeding in the digestive tract or brain by 55% in people without diabetes. (harvard.edu)
  • Study participants with diabetes had a 36% higher risk of bleeding, and aspirin use did not change this risk. (harvard.edu)
  • Diabetes can dramatically increase the risk of developing heart disease. (cnn.com)
  • Kirkman stresses that people with diabetes who are taking aspirin--and have no history of heart attack--should talk to their doctor and see if he or she recommends continuing the therapy. (cnn.com)
  • According to Nissen, 'the right person would likely have a cluster of risk factors for heart disease, such as diabetes, smoking, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure,' he says. (cnn.com)
  • Also, some work has shown that diabetes itself carries an increased risk of hemorrhage. (medpagetoday.com)
  • However, diabetes was independently associated with an increased risk for major bleeding (IRR 1.36, 95% I 1.28 to 1.44) regardless of aspirin use, a finding that "deserves additional consideration," the researchers wrote. (medpagetoday.com)
  • rofecoxib
  • Further data, from the APPROVe trial, showed a statistically significant relative risk of cardiovascular events of 1.97 versus placebo-which caused a worldwide withdrawal of rofecoxib in October 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • Study
  • A large-scale study finds that the long-term use of aspirin cuts the chances of developing digestive cancers almost in half. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In this study, researchers compared 1442 women with all forms of breast cancer with 1420 women without the disease and conducted interviews regarding their use of aspirin. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • The study and concurrent survey showed that women who were more likely to use aspirin if they had a family history of cardiovascular disease or had high cholesterol. (prweb.com)
  • Study authors have decided more educational programs are needed to increase awareness regarding how aspirin can be used as a preventative for heart disease among women. (prweb.com)
  • Women in the study who used aspirin at least four times a week for at least three months were almost 30 percent less likely to develop hormone-fueled breast cancer than women who used no aspirin. (onlineathens.com)
  • We need to reconsider the evidence and see who benefits from aspirin therapy and who does not," said Ahmed N. Mahmoud, M.D., a cardiology fellow in the department of medicine and a co-author of the study. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • Our study highlights the need for greater awareness of the increased risk of cardiovascular events, such as [heart attack], that is associated with interruption of aspirin therapy," says Dr. Garcia Rodriguez. (nyhq.org)
  • In an accompanying editorial, Jolanta Siller-Matula, MD, PhD, of the Medical University of Vienna in Austria, wrote that the study "underscores that the potential risk of bleeding should be carefully considered in decision making. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The study was limited because it wasn't possible to consider variables that aren't routinely captured in claims databases, including lifestyle factors such as obesity, smoking, alcohol consumption, or the use of over-the-counter NSAIDS or over-the-counter aspirin. (medpagetoday.com)
  • However, acetaminophen is a different type of painkiller, and the study found risk of Hodgkin's was actually 70 percent higher among regular acetaminophen users. (nbcnews.com)
  • The study raises an interesting hypothesis about aspirin, but just how strong a role the transcription factor plays is controversial, said Dr. Ernest Hawk of the National Cancer Institute. (nbcnews.com)
  • The MALOVA (MALignant OVArian cancer) study is a multidisciplinary Danish study of Ovarian Cancer and encompasses epidemiology, lifestyle factors, biochemistry, and molecular biology with the purpose of identifying risk factors and prognostic factors for Ovarian Cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Aspirin not only calms inflammation, but it is thought to inactivate a protein, called a transcription factor, which is important for Hodgkin's cells to survive, said epidemiologist Ellen Chang, the study's lead author. (nbcnews.com)
  • cancer
  • There are a number of things that we can do to prevent cancer, including leading a healthy lifestyle and having regular screenings if we are at risk. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • More specifically, aspirin users were 47 percent less likely to have liver and esophageal cancer, 38 percent less likely to have stomach cancer, and 34 percent less likely to have pancreatic cancer. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • 7 times a week showed a 26% risk reduction for developing the type of breast tumor that is stimulated by the hormone estrogen, the most common form of breast cancer. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Association of frequency and duration of aspirin use and hormone receptor status with breast cancer risk. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Can Aspirin Reduce Risk for Cancer Metastasis? (mdanderson.org)
  • Previous studies in both animals and people have shown that regular aspirin use may reduce the risk of developing colon cancer and benign growths called polyps. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Animal studies have also suggested that the benefits of aspirin may extend to people who already have colon cancer, by reducing their risk of recurrence. (rxpgnews.com)
  • After a median of 2.4 years of follow-up, the risk of colon cancer recurrence was 55% lower and the risk of death was 48% lower among the aspirin users compared with non-users. (rxpgnews.com)
  • People with colon cancer who are interested in taking aspirin should first speak with their doctors. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Even if it is, Hodgkins' disease is too rare a cancer to ever recommend aspirin as a preventive, scientists caution. (nbcnews.com)
  • Aspirin and Cancer Risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • clopidogrel
  • But if they are not on it, or are having some difficulties, then the combination of clopidogrel and aspirin could provide some advantage,' he said. (pulsetoday.co.uk)
  • Often a combination of aspirin plus an ADP/P2Y inhibitor (such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor, or another) is used in order to obtain greater effectiveness than with either agent alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancers
  • Aspirin could prevent digestive cancers, especially in the elderly, suggests new research. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Taking 75 mg of aspirin every day for five years or more reduces the risk of dying from a range of common cancers, a review of randomised trials has found. (bmj.com)
  • clot formation
  • One scoring system analyzes the probability for clot formation by assigning a point value system to significant risk factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • doses
  • The combination of paracetamol with aspirin also creates the risk of renal papillary necrosis if large doses are taken chronically. (wikipedia.org)
  • acetaminophen
  • There's no clear biologic reason why acetaminophen would be associated with higher Hodgkin's disease risk," said Chang, now with Sweden's Karolinska Institute. (nbcnews.com)
  • As with all medications containing paracetamol (acetaminophen), concomitant use with alcohol carries a significant risk of hepatotoxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • suggests
  • Topical salicylic acid is common in many over-the-counter dermatological agents and the lack of adverse reports suggests a low risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • benefit
  • The Journal of Women's Health has shown evidence that less than half of the women who could benefit from aspirin are taking it. (prweb.com)
  • Each drug has a benefit-risk profile and balancing the risk of no treatment with the competing potential risks of various therapies is the clinician's responsibility. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapy
  • They found that aspirin therapy only marginally increases the risk of bleeding in diabetics, possibly because it is less effective in suppressing clotting ability in this group. (medicinenet.com)
  • Participants completed surveys about their use of aspirin and other medications midway through therapy and six months after completion of treatment. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The team found that those who stopped taking aspirin within three years of beginning their therapy experienced a 60 percent rise in their risk for nonfatal heart attack. (nyhq.org)
  • reduce the risk
  • Another meta-analysis showed that not only did aerobic exercise reduce the risk of dementia but it may also slow cognitive decline in those with dementia. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • It's also remarkably safe for all but those at risk of allergy or bleeding complications, and it's inexpensive. (nyhq.org)
  • heart
  • Once you have a cluster of risk factors, you start to look like someone who has already had a heart attack. (cnn.com)
  • Anyone who has had a heart attack will know that one of the most surprising medications used to reduce your risk of future heart attack is aspirin. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • That puts them at greater risk for having a heart attack. (nyhq.org)
  • If you are at risk for heart disease and have any of these symptoms, call 911 and seek medical attention immediately. (nyhq.org)
  • Physical interventions then become contraindicated due to the risk of the clot migrating to distant locations like the heart, brain, and lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Side effects include an increased risk of stomach ulcers and heart attacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Repeated concussions may also increase the risk in later life of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Parkinson's disease, or depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevent
  • Although aspirin thins the blood and helps prevent clots, it is not risk free, according to the U.K. review led by a panel of experts. (cnn.com)
  • Although aspirin can prevent clots, which cause about 80 percent of strokes, it may increase the risk of hemorrhagic strokes, which are caused by bleeding in the brain. (cnn.com)
  • Niacin (vitamin B3) is also believed to prevent dementia as research shows those who have the highest levels of niacin in their blood, are believed to have the lowest risk of developing dementia or having cognitive decline. (wikipedia.org)