• shortness of bre
  • Skin bulges indicating implanted devices: pacemaker, ICD, implantable loop recorder, vagus nerve stimulation Vasculitis rashes Xanthomas & xanthelasmas Vital signs Blood pressure - hypertension, congenital heart disease manifestations Heart rate - bradycardia & tachycardia Respiratory rate - in distress, shortness of breath causes Hypertension - elevated blood pressure above "normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient's
  • He observed that a rolled notebook, placed between the patient's chest and his ear, could amplify heart sounds without requiring physical contact. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the lung field is consolidated (filled with liquid or other solid mass such as tumor or fungus ball), the patient's spoken English long E will sound like a "pure-voweled" long E or a modern English long A without the latter's usual offglide. (wikipedia.org)
  • no R/R/W (rhonchi, rales or wheezes)" The examiner then observes the patient's respiratory rate, which is typically conducted under the pretext of some other exam, so that patient does not subconsciously increase their baseline respiratory rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • typical of hyperinflation seen in COPD Pectus excavatum - sternum sunken into the chest Pectus carinatum - sternum protruding from the chest As well as the patient's respiratory rate, the pattern of breathing is also noted: An acidotic patient will have more rapid breathing to compensate, known as Kussmaul breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • bronchophony is the phenomenon of the patient's voice remaining loud at the periphery of the lungs or sounding louder than usual over a distinct area of consolidation, such as in pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • lungs
  • Any sound heard over the lungs, bronchi, or trachea. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In egophony, the person being examined continually speaks the English long-sound "E". The lungs are usually air filled, but if there is an abnormal solid component due to infection, fluid, or tumor, the higher frequencies of the "E" sound will be diminished. (wikipedia.org)
  • Egophony (British English, aegophony) is an increased resonance of voice sounds heard when auscultating the lungs, often caused by lung consolidation and fibrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • While listening to the lungs with a stethoscope, the patient is asked to pronounce the modern English (more generally, post-Great Vowel Shift) long-E vowel sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • that is, fluid or consolidation causes the sound of the voice to be transmitted loudly to the periphery of the lungs where it is usually not heard. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bronchophony, also known as bronchiloquy, is the abnormal transmission of sounds from the lungs or bronchi. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term diffuse signifies that lesions appear throughout both lungs, while panbronchiolitis refers to inflammation found in all layers of the respiratory bronchioles (those involved in gas exchange). (wikipedia.org)
  • it is characterized by dilation and thickening of the walls of the bronchioles, inflammatory damage to respiratory and terminal bronchioles, and pooling of mucus in the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Airway
  • Along with DPB, additional forms of primary bronchiolitis include bronchiolitis obliterans, follicular bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, mineral dust airway disease, and a number of others. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiological
  • even supposing the analytical ideas of sign processing are principally self sufficient of the appliance, interpretation in their effects on organic facts, i.e. breathing sounds, calls for giant realizing of the concerned physiological approach. (ruxiqueshop.com)
  • Chest
  • Even if we assume that the heart and lung sounds are uncorrelated in their source of generation, they become correlated when we record them on the surface of the chest wall as they both pass through the same medium. (ruxiqueshop.com)
  • cls 30 November 1, 2006 16:42 FUNDAMENTALS OF RESPIRATORY SOUNDS AND ANALYSIS In lung sounds were recorded from two sensors on the chest wall to provide two mixed signals, and then ICA was applied on the spectrograms of the signals. (ruxiqueshop.com)
  • Somewhat related, bronchophony, a form of pectoriloquy, is a conventional respiratory examination whereby the clinician auscultates the chest while asking the patient to repeat the word "ninety-nine" (to be pronounced "nointy-noin", per its German origin). (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • Draeger's new PSS 7000 self-contained breathing apparatus includes a fully integrated electronic monitoring system, called Sentinel 7000, and a comfort sealing face mask, called FPS 7000, designed for surround sound communication. (cos-mag.com)
  • The communication system includes Draeger's new titanium sound technology (TTS), which has a resistance to high temperature environments. (cos-mag.com)
  • Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) results from structural and functional abnormalities of the respiratory system. (scielo.br)
  • The contraction of the diaphragm muscle cause a pressure variation, which is equal to the pressures caused by elastic, resistive and inertial components of the respiratory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • pleural
  • Above the level of pleural effusion Pneumonia (lung consolidation) Fibrosis Egophony comes from the Greek word for "goat," (αἴξ aix, aig-) in reference to the bleating quality of the sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • denser
  • This is because sound travels differently through denser (fluid or solid) media than the air that should normally be predominant in lung tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is because sound travels faster through denser material than air. (wikipedia.org)
  • lung sound
  • This is highly questionable as the ECG signal is not the noise of the lung sound record and hence even if the filter tries to adapt itself to the ECG signal, the results will not be meaningful. (ruxiqueshop.com)
  • frequencies
  • It is due to enhanced transmission of high-frequency sound across fluid, such as in abnormal lung tissue, with lower frequencies filtered out. (wikipedia.org)
  • The terms hearing impaired or hard of hearing are usually reserved for people who have relative insensitivity to sound in the speech frequencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In profound deafness, even the loudest sounds produced by an audiometer (an instrument used to measure hearing by producing pure tone sounds through a range of frequencies) may not be detected. (wikipedia.org)
  • heard
  • In total deafness, no sounds at all, regardless of amplification or method of production, are heard. (wikipedia.org)
  • rate
  • but this prescription is not consistently followed, even by most health care providers, because the term respiratory rate (RR) is a well-established term in health care, even though it would need to be consistently replaced with ventilation rate if the precise usage were to be followed. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • Less commonly, "mechanic's stethoscopes", equipped with rod shaped chestpieces, are used to listen to internal sounds made by machines (for example, sounds and vibrations emitted by worn ball bearings), such as diagnosing a malfunctioning automobile engine by listening to the sounds of its internal parts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Speech perception - Another aspect of hearing involves the perceived clarity of a word rather than the amplitude of sound made by the word. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • This changes the sound produced, from a long "E" sound to a long "A" sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • This effect occurs because the solid mass in the lung field will disproportionately dampen the articulated sound's acoustic overtones higher in the harmonic series, transmuting the English long E, in which higher overtones predominate strongly, to a sound (the English long A) in which higher overtones predominate only slightly, i.e., to a markedly lesser degree than in the former sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • Experimental results show that the respiratory split can be accurately measured. (mdpi.com)
  • Both the trend of split varying with respect to respiratory phase and the numerical range of split varying are comparable to the results disclosed by previous physiologists. (mdpi.com)