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  • apnea
  • The effects of central sleep apnea in Cheyne-Stokes respiration on sleep-related symptoms and quality of life are not very well established. (diva-portal.org)
  • Cheyne-Stokes respiration /ˈtʃeɪnˈstoʊks/ is an abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by progressively deeper, and sometimes faster, breathing followed by a gradual decrease that results in a temporary stop in breathing called an apnea. (wikipedia.org)
  • The distinction lies in what is observed at the trough of ventilation: Cheyne-Stokes respiration involves apnea (since apnea is a prominent feature in their original description) while periodic breathing involves hypopnea (abnormally small but not absent breaths). (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • Physiological respiration involves the mechanisms that ensure that the composition of the functional residual capacity is kept constant, and equilibrates with the gases dissolved in the pulmonary capillary blood, and thus throughout the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • Another example is methanogenesis, a form of carbonate respiration, that is used to produce methane gas by anaerobic digestion. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus
  • Respiration is sometimes called BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION and thus may be compared to BURNING. (angelfire.com)
  • Thus Cheyne-Stokes respiration can be maintained over periods of many minutes or hours with a repetitive pattern of apneas and hyperpneas. (wikipedia.org)
  • life
  • On Youth, Old Age, Life and Death, and Respiration (Greek: Περὶ νεότητος καὶ γήρως, καὶ ζωῆς καὶ θανάτου, καὶ ἀναπνοῆς, Latin: De Juventute et Senectute, De Vita et Morte, De Respiratione) is one of the short treatises that make up Aristotle's Parva Naturalia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The work may, instead, be considered as a single, unified treatise on life, death, and the functions necessary to life: nutrition and respiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The title On Youth, Old Age, Life and Death, and Respiration, given in the Medieval manuscripts, derives from the treatise's opening words: "We must now treat of youth and old age and life and death. (wikipedia.org)
  • This statement explains how respiration is part of the more general subject of life and death. (wikipedia.org)