• serotonin
  • A single injection of 100 micrograms reserpine into the crop of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, reduced CNS serotonin and dopamine levels to less than 1% of control values within 3 d. (jneurosci.org)
  • High-pressure liquid chromotography- (HPLC) determined CNS serotonin and dopamine levels remained maximally depressed for approximately 1 month following reserpine injection. (jneurosci.org)
  • Acute exposure of isolated ganglia to 10 microM reserpine for periods up to 6 hr produced a 20-30% reduction of serotonin and dopamine content. (jneurosci.org)
  • To rapidly restore amine levels in reserpine-treated animals, we bathed intact leeches in pond water containing serotonin, dopamine, or octopamine. (jneurosci.org)
  • We found that biting behavior was restored following reserpine treatment by bathing intact leeches in pond water containing serotonin or dopamine, but not octopamine. (jneurosci.org)
  • researchers
  • The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. (wikipedia.org)
  • injection
  • During this time a relatively small fraction of the total reserpine administered by injection would become associated with monoaminergic granular membranes in a more specific and irreversible manner. (aspetjournals.org)
  • tract
  • Orally administered reserpine is readily absorbed from the GI tract. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Since most of the blood leaving the GI tract passes through the liver via the portal vein, hepatic metabolism would also be expected to reduce reserpine levels in the blood. (aspetjournals.org)
  • known
  • The relative contributions of serum esterases versus hepatic metabolism in the biotransformation of reserpine in vivo are not known. (aspetjournals.org)
  • tell your doctor
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to reserpine, aspirin, any other medications, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and medications), or any of the ingredients in reserpine tablets. (medlineplus.gov)
  • administration
  • Some reserpine molecules do seem to escape metabolism, however, since significant amounts of intact reserpine have been found in fecal samples taken from both experimental animals and human beings after either oral or parenteral drug administration. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Sensitization to topical epinephrine was recorded 30 minutes after the administration of reserpine (1.0 mg/kg). (aspetjournals.org)
  • patients
  • In 1987, reserpine was considered a second-line adjunct agent for patients who were uncontrolled on a diuretic alone when cost was an issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • properties
  • Because of its lipophilic properties, reserpine would easily penetrate cell membranes and then bind possibly electrostatically to intracellular membrane components, particularly those rich in phospholipids. (aspetjournals.org)
  • studies
  • Tranquilizer, as a term, was brought into existence by F.F. Yonkman (1953), from the conclusions of investigative studies using the drug Reserpine, showed the drug had a calming effect on all animals it was administered to. (wikipedia.org)