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  • widely
  • While focused on supporting and collaborating with the global research and scientific community, ATCC activities range widely, from repository-related operations to providing standard and specialized services, conducting in-house R&D, and intellectual property management. (atcc.org)
  • Based on such systems, he has established international research collaborations to develop three animal models: Transgenic Polio Mice - Widely used in polio vaccine neurovirulence testing as a replacement for monkeys. (wikipedia.org)
  • The IAT is now widely used in social psychology research and, to some extent, in clinical, cognitive, and developmental psychology research. (wikipedia.org)
  • biomedical
  • After some more general remarks in §2, we first document problems with reproducibility in basically three areas (§3): inanimate matter (physics, chemistry), living organisms (biomedical sciences) and mental processes (psychology, cognitive science, consciousness studies). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Established by the World Medical Association, the declaration recommended guidelines for medical doctors conducting biomedical research that involves human subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • NIH Office of Science Policy is the primary advisor to the Director of the NIH on matters of biomedical research policy issues that are of significance to the agency, the research community, and the public. (wikipedia.org)
  • describes
  • The infrastructure school is tied closely with the notion of "cyberscience", which describes the trend of applying information and communication technologies to scientific research, which has led to an amicable development of the infrastructure school. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • Recent headlines decry the alarming amount of irreproducible data in published research papers. (mbfbioscience.com)
  • Our program included five symposia: "Getting to the Best Reaction: Tools for Finding a Needle in a Haystack," "Defining Value in Scholarly Communications," "Research Results: Reproducibility, Reporting, Sharing and Plagiarism," "Molecular and Structural 2D and 3D Chemical Fingerprinting," and "Development and Use of Data Format Standards for Cheminformatics. (acscinf.org)
  • By the same token, this workshop is interested also on articles addressing methodologies for monitoring, maintaining or improving citation of language resources and tools and to assess the importance of data citation for research integrity and for the advancement of natural language science and technology. (ul.pt)
  • Open science is the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. (wikipedia.org)
  • These include financial paywalls of for-profit research publishers, restrictions on usage applied by publishers of data, poor formatting of data or use of proprietary software that makes it difficult to re-purpose, and cultural reluctance to publish data for fears of losing control of how the information is used. (wikipedia.org)
  • The current NIH Associate Director for Science Policy is Carrie D. Wolinetz, Ph.D. The NIH Office of Science Policy works on a wide range of issues including biosafety, biosecurity, genetic testing, genomic data sharing, human subjects protections, the organization and management of the NIH, and the outputs and value of NIH-funded research. (wikipedia.org)
  • and, 2) the sharing and management of scientific data to promote reproducibility and translation of research results to advance science, medicine, and public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • appendix D Practical explanation of repeatability and reproducibility in terms of how data can be different between samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • reproducible
  • Such non-reproducible results impede scientific progress and are a waste of research funding. (knaw.nl)
  • Before his concepts were applied, it was generally considered to be very difficult or even impossible to obtain reproducible results in medical research using laboratory animals, mainly due the traditional consensus that the animals are living organisms with individual differences. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Collective Optimization Database is an important part of the Collective Tuning Initiative which is developing open-source R&D tools for collaborative and reproducible computing systems' research. (wikipedia.org)
  • precisely
  • Specifically, all necessary mathematical equations, as well as parameter values, initial values of variables, and stimuli used should be given precisely for successful reproduction of scientific results. (frontiersin.org)
  • Conduct
  • Specific activities include optimizing the conduct and oversight of gene transfer research, updating and interpreting biosafety policies under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant and Synthetic Nucleic Acids, collaborating with Federal partners to develop and implement U.S. government policies regarding dual use research, and managing the NIH Stem Cell Registry. (wikipedia.org)
  • consistent
  • It yields a formally sound and empirically applicable procedure to translate between descriptive levels and thus construct level-specific criteria for reproducibility in an overall consistent fashion. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • If repeated use of the same measurement tool on the same sample produces the same consistent results, the measurement is considered reliable. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Science
  • ATCC conducts independent research in support of its mission and utilizes the latest technology, such as Droplet Digital™ PCR, CRISPR, and Next Generation Sequencing to authenticate and develop quality products that drive innovation and standards in science. (atcc.org)
  • Reproducibility in Language Science and Technology: Ready for the Integrity Debate? (ul.pt)
  • The reproducibility of research results is one of the key cornerstones of scientific methodology-a gold standard for science as it were. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science, and generally making it easier to publish and communicate scientific knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • The European-funded project Facilitate Open Science Training for European Research (FOSTER) has developed an open science taxonomy as an attempt to map the open science field. (wikipedia.org)
  • To show the term's multitudinous perceptions, they differentiate between five Open Science schools of thought: The infrastructure school is founded on the assumption that "efficient" research depends on the availability of tools and applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in science, a very well reproduced result is one that can be confirmed using as many different experimental setups as possible and as many lines of evidence as possible (consilience). (wikipedia.org)
  • The first to stress the importance of reproducibility in science was the Irish chemist Robert Boyle, in England in the 17th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such assertions express a common dogma in modern science that reproducibility is a necessary condition (although not necessarily sufficient) for establishing a scientific fact, and in practice for establishing scientific authority in any field of knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human subject research can be either medical (clinical) research or non-medical (e.g., social science) research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The continued success of tissue engineering, and the eventual development of true human replacement parts, will grow from the convergence of engineering and basic research advances in tissue, matrix, growth factor, stem cell, and developmental biology, as well as materials science and bio informatics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some specific fields of science the results of observation differ depending on factors which are not important in everyday observation. (wikipedia.org)
  • His doctoral research included a paper titled, "A Mechanisms and Kinetics Study of Polymeric Thin-film Deposition in Glow Discharge" that was published later in the Journal of Macromolecular Science - Chemistry (1976). (wikipedia.org)
  • systematic
  • Play media Human subject research is systematic, scientific investigation that can be either interventional (a "trial") or observational (no "test article") and involves human beings as research subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Next to unintentional but possibly systematic error, there is always the possibility of deliberate misrepresentation of scientific results, whether for gain, fame, or ideological motives. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, there is no established venue for publications on the topic, and perhaps more problematically, research that investigates existing methods rather than introducing new ones is often implicitly discouraged in the process of peer review. (springer.com)
  • However, as discussed in Howison and Herbsleb ( 2013 ), even though its importance is increasingly recognized, often not enough (academic) credit is given for making the code and resources used to produce a set of results available. (springer.com)
  • In recent years, however, many existing results in medicine, the life sciences, psychology and other fields could not be reproduced. (knaw.nl)
  • medicine
  • and 2) the development and implementation of health care research, outcomes research, and evidence-based medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Qigong practices were brought to the public beginning in the 1950s, when the Communist Party institutionalized and began research into traditional Chinese medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • It produces statistics that evaluate the ability of the appraisers to agree with themselves (repeatability), with each other (reproducibility), and with a known master or correct value (overall accuracy) for each characteristic - over and over again. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • This course covers the core norms, principles, regulations, and rules governing the practice of research. (citiprogram.org)
  • Gong (or kung) is often translated as cultivation or work, and definitions include practice, skill, mastery, merit, achievement, service, result, or accomplishment, and is often used to mean gongfu (kung fu) in the traditional sense of achievement through great effort. (wikipedia.org)
  • collaborative
  • This course provides an in-depth review of the core RCR topics including authorship, collaborative research, conflicts of interest, human subjects, and research misconduct. (citiprogram.org)
  • The Director is expected to leverage an increasingly networked and collaborative information environment as an important partner with MIT's academic and administrative units to advance the Institute's research, teaching, and global agendas in alignment with its mission and values. (digital-scholarship.org)
  • The Collective Tuning Initiative is a community-driven initiative started by Grigori Fursin to develop free collaborative open-source research tools with unified API for code and architecture characterization, optimization and co-design. (wikipedia.org)
  • produces
  • JASP generally produces APA style results tables and plots to ease publication. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mutagen produces mutations in the DNA, and deleterious mutation can result in aberrant, impaired or loss of function for a particular gene, and accumulation of mutations may lead to cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • comparable
  • Additionally, we studied how well the selected models can be reused and whether they are comparable in other stimulation conditions and research settings. (frontiersin.org)
  • process
  • reproducibility means that the process of establishing a fact, or the conditions under which the same fact can be observed, is repeatable. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Measurement reduces an observation to a number which can be recorded, and two observations which result in the same number are equal within the resolution of the process. (wikipedia.org)
  • One problem encountered throughout scientific fields is that the observation may affect the process being observed, resulting in a different outcome than if the process was unobserved. (wikipedia.org)
  • So any interaction between an isolated wave function and the external world that results in this wave function collapse is called an observation or measurement, whether or not it is part of a deliberate observation process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, well-intentioned operators without authority often changed process settings that affected etch results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Given that the object selection and measurement process are typically subjective, when results of that subjective process are generalized to the larger system from which the object was selected, the stated conclusions are necessarily biased. (wikipedia.org)
  • FOSTER
  • This workshop seeks to foster the discussion and the advancement on a topic that has been so far given insufficient attention in the research area of language processing tools and resources (Branco, 2013, Fokkens et al. (ul.pt)
  • regulate
  • The Declaration of Helsinki was established in 1964 to regulate international research involving human subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial pancreas: research involves using islet cells to produce and regulate insulin, particularly in cases of diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • 2015), to the point that it has recently crossed the borders of the research world and made its appearance in important mass media and was brought to the attention of the general public (e.g. (ul.pt)
  • Boyle, a pioneer of the experimental method, maintained that the foundations of knowledge should be constituted by experimentally produced facts, which can be made believable to a scientific community by their reproducibility. (wikipedia.org)
  • academic
  • As a result, there is an increasingly urgent call for validation and verification of published research results, both within the academic community and the public at large (e.g. (springer.com)
  • As research has become formalized, the academic community has developed formal definitions of "human subject research", largely in response to abuses of human subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • In 2003, the NSF published a report entitled "The Emergence of Tissue Engineering as a Research Field", which gives a thorough description of the history of this field. (wikipedia.org)