• reproduce
  • In addition, we were able to reproduce the original results of only one of the models completely based on the information given in the original publications and in the errata. (frontiersin.org)
  • data
  • What is clear is that whether for the purposes of replication or reproduction of prior results, access to the resources, procedures, parameters, and test data used in an original work is critical to the exercise. (springer.com)
  • Recent headlines decry the alarming amount of irreproducible data in published research papers. (mbfbioscience.com)
  • The Academy recommends that researchers, research institutions, funding agencies and scientific journals make a joint effort to facilitate replication studies, for example by requiring the proper storage of study data. (knaw.nl)
  • By the same token, this workshop is interested also on articles addressing methodologies for monitoring, maintaining or improving citation of language resources and tools and to assess the importance of data citation for research integrity and for the advancement of natural language science and technology. (ul.pt)
  • Authors of papers and recipients of funding are increasingly being required to openly provide raw data and evidence of reproducibility. (idyll.org)
  • More information can be found in the 'Regulation and the Rules of Participation' as well as through the relevant provisions in the grant agreement (see Article 29 "Dissemination of results - Open Access - Visibility of EU funding"of the Multi-beneficiary General Model Grant Agreement, July 20, 2016, pp. 66-69) as well as exceptions for confidentiality (Article 36), security (Article 37), personal data (Article 39). (openaire.eu)
  • Open science is the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. (wikipedia.org)
  • These include financial paywalls of for-profit research publishers, restrictions on usage applied by publishers of data, poor formatting of data or use of proprietary software that makes it difficult to re-purpose, and cultural reluctance to publish data for fears of losing control of how the information is used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reproducibility is the ability to get the same research results or inferences, based on the raw data and computer programs provided by researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The current NIH Associate Director for Science Policy is Carrie D. Wolinetz, Ph.D. The NIH Office of Science Policy works on a wide range of issues including biosafety, biosecurity, genetic testing, genomic data sharing, human subjects protections, the organization and management of the NIH, and the outputs and value of NIH-funded research. (wikipedia.org)
  • and, 2) the sharing and management of scientific data to promote reproducibility and translation of research results to advance science, medicine, and public health. (wikipedia.org)
  • appendix D Practical explanation of repeatability and reproducibility in terms of how data can be different between samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • The FAbRIC (FPGA Research Infrastructure Cloud) project acquires and maintain comprehensive testbed systems and their tools for open use by researchers wishing to explore the power of reconfigurable hardware. (utexas.edu)
  • Providing Open Access to research, both research papers and (the underlying) datasets, is not only beneficial for the public, but also for the researchers: several studies indicate that openness increases citations . (openaire.eu)
  • describes
  • The infrastructure school is tied closely with the notion of "cyberscience", which describes the trend of applying information and communication technologies to scientific research, which has led to an amicable development of the infrastructure school. (wikipedia.org)
  • replication
  • For example, it has been shown that for some published results with major impact, replication of published results is difficult or impossible (e.g. (springer.com)
  • In fact, several recent articles have reported on reproducibility and/or replication problems in the HLT field (e.g. (springer.com)
  • 2015 ), and two recent workshops 1 have addressed the need for replication and reproduction of HLT results. (springer.com)
  • Related to replication is reproducibility, which is the calculation of quantitative scientific results by independent scientist using the original datasets and methods. (springer.com)
  • The replication crisis, publication bias, p-hacking, harking, bad incentives, undesirable pressures and probably other factors all contribute to diminish the trustworthiness of published research, with obvious implications for research synthesis. (researchblogging.org)
  • That is the main message of the Academy advisory report Replication studies - Improving reproducibility in the empirical sciences . (knaw.nl)
  • The immediate motivation for this increased interest is to be found in a number of factors, including the realization that for some published results, their replication is not being obtained (e.g. (ul.pt)
  • We are interested also in articles discussing the challenges, the risk factors, the procedures, etc. specific to our area or that should be adopted, or adapted from other neighboring areas, possibly including of course the new risks raised by the replication articles themselves and their own integrity, in view of the preservation of the reputation of colleagues and works whose results are reported has having been replicated, etc. (ul.pt)
  • Titus: How long should it be after a robust in-lab result is published but remains without replication before we no longer believe it? (idyll.org)
  • Guidelines
  • Specific activities include optimizing the conduct and oversight of gene transfer research, updating and interpreting biosafety policies under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant and Synthetic Nucleic Acids, collaborating with Federal partners to develop and implement U.S. government policies regarding dual use research, and managing the NIH Stem Cell Registry. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the Guidelines for Evaluating and Expressing the Uncertainty of NIST Measurement Results, the following conditions need to be fulfilled in the establishment of repeatability: the same experimental tools the same observer the same measuring instrument, used under the same conditions the same location repetition over a short period of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Funding
  • Establishing better policies to support the process of transparency and verification may benefit scientists through sustainable funding and the general public through translated research. (idyll.org)
  • Titus: So, reproducibility is important because of funding? (idyll.org)
  • human
  • Play media Human subject research is systematic, scientific investigation that can be either interventional (a "trial") or observational (no "test article") and involves human beings as research subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human subject research can be either medical (clinical) research or non-medical (e.g., social science) research. (wikipedia.org)
  • A specific, and especially heavily regulated, type of medical human subject research is the "clinical trial", in which drugs, vaccines and medical devices are evaluated. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the other hand, human subject research in the social sciences often involves surveys which consist of questions to a particular group of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • As research has become formalized, the academic community has developed formal definitions of "human subject research", largely in response to abuses of human subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Declaration of Helsinki was established in 1964 to regulate international research involving human subjects. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Declaration of Helsinki is widely regarded as the cornerstone document on human research ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the job of the researcher to inform the persons of the benefits as well as the risks of human subject research. (wikipedia.org)
  • The continued success of tissue engineering, and the eventual development of true human replacement parts, will grow from the convergence of engineering and basic research advances in tissue, matrix, growth factor, stem cell, and developmental biology, as well as materials science and bio informatics. (wikipedia.org)
  • systematic
  • citation needed] Next to unintentional but possibly systematic error, there is always the possibility of deliberate misrepresentation of scientific results, whether for gain, fame, or ideological motives. (wikipedia.org)
  • topic
  • However, there is no established venue for publications on the topic, and perhaps more problematically, research that investigates existing methods rather than introducing new ones is often implicitly discouraged in the process of peer review. (springer.com)
  • MBF Bioscience is hosting a symposium addressing the topic on Sunday, October 18 at 6:30pm entitled "Quantitative Microscopy: Enhancing the Reproducibility of Your Research Results with Stereology. (mbfbioscience.com)
  • This workshop seeks to foster the discussion and the advancement on a topic that has been so far given insufficient attention in the research area of language processing tools and resources (Branco, 2013, Fokkens et al. (ul.pt)
  • That is the topic of the reproducibility of research results and the citation of resources, and its impact on research integrity. (ul.pt)
  • precisely
  • Specifically, all necessary mathematical equations, as well as parameter values, initial values of variables, and stimuli used should be given precisely for successful reproduction of scientific results. (frontiersin.org)
  • publish
  • It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science, and generally making it easier to publish and communicate scientific knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • medicine
  • In recent years, however, many existing results in medicine, the life sciences, psychology and other fields could not be reproduced. (knaw.nl)
  • and 2) the development and implementation of health care research, outcomes research, and evidence-based medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Qigong practices were brought to the public beginning in the 1950s, when the Communist Party institutionalized and began research into traditional Chinese medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • areas
  • In FP7, there was an Open Access Pilot for publications, applicable for approximately 20 % of the budget and in 7 dedicated research areas. (openaire.eu)
  • known
  • It produces statistics that evaluate the ability of the appraisers to agree with themselves (repeatability), with each other (reproducibility), and with a known master or correct value (overall accuracy) for each characteristic - over and over again. (wikipedia.org)
  • Design
  • The Collective Tuning Initiative is a community-driven initiative started by Grigori Fursin to develop free collaborative open-source research tools with unified API for code and architecture characterization, optimization and co-design. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • This course covers the core norms, principles, regulations, and rules governing the practice of research. (citiprogram.org)
  • Such assertions express a common dogma in modern science that reproducibility is a necessary condition (although not necessarily sufficient) for establishing a scientific fact, and in practice for establishing scientific authority in any field of knowledge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gong (or kung) is often translated as cultivation or work, and definitions include practice, skill, mastery, merit, achievement, service, result, or accomplishment, and is often used to mean gongfu (kung fu) in the traditional sense of achievement through great effort. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Same or different results? (idyll.org)
  • However, in science, a very well reproduced result is one that can be confirmed using as many different experimental setups as possible and as many lines of evidence as possible (consilience). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, a reading test that is administered in September to a third grade class may yield different results when retaken in June. (wikipedia.org)
  • However the need for reproducibility requires that observations by different observers can be comparable. (wikipedia.org)
  • One problem encountered throughout scientific fields is that the observation may affect the process being observed, resulting in a different outcome than if the process was unobserved. (wikipedia.org)
  • collaborative
  • The Director is expected to leverage an increasingly networked and collaborative information environment as an important partner with MIT's academic and administrative units to advance the Institute's research, teaching, and global agendas in alignment with its mission and values. (digital-scholarship.org)
  • Disease
  • Although some of these mutations are lethal or cause serious disease, many have minor effects as they do not result in residue changes that have significant effect on the structure and function of the proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • comparable
  • Additionally, we studied how well the selected models can be reused and whether they are comparable in other stimulation conditions and research settings. (frontiersin.org)
  • field
  • For best results, use the separate Authors field to search for author names. (osapublishing.org)
  • The European-funded project Facilitate Open Science Training for European Research (FOSTER) has developed an open science taxonomy as an attempt to map the open science field. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2003, the NSF published a report entitled "The Emergence of Tissue Engineering as a Research Field", which gives a thorough description of the history of this field. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • 2015), to the point that it has recently crossed the borders of the research world and made its appearance in important mass media and was brought to the attention of the general public (e.g. (ul.pt)
  • Why is reproducibility important? (idyll.org)
  • regulate
  • Artificial pancreas: research involves using islet cells to produce and regulate insulin, particularly in cases of diabetes. (wikipedia.org)
  • assumption
  • To show the term's multitudinous perceptions, they differentiate between five Open Science schools of thought: The infrastructure school is founded on the assumption that "efficient" research depends on the availability of tools and applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, as discussed in Howison and Herbsleb ( 2013 ), even though its importance is increasingly recognized, often not enough (academic) credit is given for making the code and resources used to produce a set of results available. (springer.com)
  • original
  • We specifically addressed how well the original simulation results can be reproduced with a reimplementation of the models. (frontiersin.org)
  • after modifying the equations accordingly, the original results were reproduced more accurately. (frontiersin.org)