• 1971
  • Over the last decade the histories of religion and of medicine in the early modern period have developed a more conceptually robust demeanour embracing the achievements and examples of works like Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971) and Charles Webster's The Great Instauration (1975). (history.ac.uk)
  • charity
  • Fa Xian, a Chinese Buddhist monk who travelled across India ca. 400 CE, recorded in his travelogue that The heads of the Vaishya [merchant] families in them [all the kingdoms of north India] establish in the cities houses for dispensing charity and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the third century, the Christian church was responsible for almost all charity, including charity in the field of medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Islam
  • vol. 1, pp. 886-7 Lutz Richter-Bernburg, Iran's Contribution to Medicine and Veterinary Science in Islam AD 100-900/AD 700-1500", in The Diffusion of Greco-Roman Medicine in the Middle East and the Caucasus, ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of these many religions, Islam has had the most lasting and culturally significant influence on the region, encompassing well over ninety percent (90%) of the population by some measurements. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Through religion it is taught that birth is not a disease that needs treatment but a part of the life. (gvsu.edu)
  • The public, then as well as now, used literature as a medium through which they projected how they viewed their reality, including views of medicine and disease. (wmich.edu)
  • This includes the view that disease is a mental error rather than physical disorder, and that the sick should be treated not by medicine, but by a form of prayer that seeks to correct the beliefs responsible for the illusion of ill health. (wikipedia.org)
  • beliefs
  • Whether exploring and interpreting the impact of diverse Protestant theologies and beliefs upon the universities, the parishes, or the popular mentalité, historians of religion have become comfortable with exploring the nature, meaning and function of 'religion' in early modern historiography. (history.ac.uk)
  • Another strategy has concentrated upon 'popular' religion, the beliefs and activities of the common people performed in the parish or the environment of the family. (history.ac.uk)
  • I just need the opinions and beliefs of various people, of different ages and religions. (livejournal.com)
  • Clark
  • Religion' to a Christopher Haigh or a John Morrill, or a Jonathon Clark or a Christopher Hill, may invoke very different, contradictory and perhaps radically incommensurable understandings of ecclesiastical institutions, patterns of belief, articulations of meaning, processes of communal identity, or discourses of legitimation. (history.ac.uk)
  • physical
  • A team of researchers led by Steven Pirutinsky of Columbia University trained their investigative lens on the interaction between depression, physical health, and intrinsic religiosity - participating in religion for its own sake, without necessarily expecting social or material rewards - among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews. (patheos.com)
  • movement
  • Christian Science leaders place their religion within mainstream Christian teaching, according to J. Gordon Melton, and reject any identification with the New Thought movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Doctors
  • Doctors that follow this form of "Christian medicine" typically endorse the apparent health benefits of prayer and fasting, advocated by the Church, while sharing the Church's view of abortion, contraception and homosexuality as grave sins. (balkaninsight.com)
  • prayer
  • They have great faith in prayer for healing, but somehow feel that medicine and prayer are opposed. (mentalhealth.com)
  • The following passage from the New American Bible (Book of Sirach [Ecclesiasticus] 38:1-15) helps to explain how medicine and prayer are not opposed. (mentalhealth.com)
  • stories
  • Also on the show was Jeff Polish, executive director of The Monti , who is curating a storytelling show featuring stories about the intersection of medicine and religion this Friday at the Carolina Theatre. (duke.edu)
  • cases
  • Following the death of their son, the Swans left the Christian Science Church, and in 1983, Rita Swan founded the nonprofit organization, Children's Healthcare is a Legal Duty (CHILD), and has worked "relentlessly" to publicize cases of religion-related child abuse and neglect. (wikipedia.org)
  • particularly
  • Also available from MSC Officer of the Order of Australia, 11 June 1979, "In recognition of service to the community, particularly in the fields of religion, medicine and Aboriginal welfare" Companion of the Order of Australia, 26 January 1993, "In recognition of service to medicine, particularly through research into Aboriginal eye health and to the community. (wikipedia.org)
  • Christian
  • For some historians 'religion' is to be most readily identified with a traditional understanding of Christian faith: a complex admixture of doctrinal, ceremonial, liturgical and pastoral propositions and activities. (history.ac.uk)
  • Christian Science became the fastest growing religion in the United States, with nearly 270,000 members by 1936, a figure that had declined by 1990 to just over 100,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most significantly, she dismissed the material world as an illusion, rather than as merely subordinate to Mind, leading her to reject the use of medicine, or materia medica, and making Christian Science the most controversial of the metaphysical groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • relationship
  • For the Orthodox, intrinsic religion was about a relationship with the Divine, and a good relationship appeared to protect against depression. (patheos.com)
  • patient
  • An understanding of how to improve patient adherence to treatment plans can also be found through religion. (gvsu.edu)
  • The medicine man would sing and dance to send the patient into a trance before asking the spirit to leave the body. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • early
  • If the anthropological tradition was interested in exploring (very crudely) the meaning that religion had for early modern society, those who emphasized the political dimensions of religion ultimately stressed the connections between religion and power. (history.ac.uk)
  • Early medicine in France was defined by, and administered by, the Catholic church. (wikipedia.org)
  • politics
  • With a similar intent the collection of essays edited by M.A. Goldie, and others, invoked the phrase 'the politics of religion' to identify the importance of the ecclesiological nexus between Church and State. (history.ac.uk)
  • knowledge
  • It is important to incorporate different fields of knowledge into medicine, to create a better environment for healing. (gvsu.edu)
  • different
  • Today religion is still an important part of the healing process and it is from different religions that we get old ways to heal patients when new innovated ways fail. (gvsu.edu)
  • approach
  • That is to say that on top of the rather diluted anthropological approach to the function of religion within parish communities derived from the exemplar of Thomas' work, a sort of political sociology has been grafted. (history.ac.uk)
  • study
  • More recently, developing from the writings of two Cambridge historians in the 1980s, the study of religion has become more political. (history.ac.uk)
  • Among the small group assisting with the catering are a pharmacy student and Ciprian's younger sister, who hopes to study medicine herself. (balkaninsight.com)
  • order
  • Religion then was as much a system of administration, a tool of state formation or legitimation, as a generator of meaning and cultural order. (history.ac.uk)