• Galen
  • The development of science and medicine pioneered by Galen, a philosopher whose medical knowledge and theory guided practitioners for almost two millennia, hit levels of exploration and understanding in ancient Rome that warranted its basis as common medical theory. (wmich.edu)
  • During the Middle Ages in Western Europe, the medical knowledge and understanding that people relied on was from the Roman and Greek understanding of medicine, specifically Galen, Hippocrates, and Aristotle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healing
  • They have great faith in prayer for healing, but somehow feel that medicine and prayer are opposed. (mentalhealth.com)
  • Today religion is still an important part of the healing process and it is from different religions that we get old ways to heal patients when new innovated ways fail. (gvsu.edu)
  • It is important to incorporate different fields of knowledge into medicine, to create a better environment for healing. (gvsu.edu)
  • Immigration, religion, and the migration of healing practices - how do religiously-informed healing practices migrate across borders with or without the communities in which they develop and have meaning? (rsnonline.org)
  • Finally, like its sister field of medical anthropology, the field of religions, medicines, and healing encourages examination of how affliction and healing affect social bodies through fractured identities, political divides, structural violence, and colonialism. (rsnonline.org)
  • They promoted the link between spiritual healing and actual medicine, best exemplified by the ever-present Christus medicus in these medical institutions, an artistic representation of Jesus as a physician. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Many of these papers attempt to correct shortcomings in the previous religion-health literature, including a lack of good theoretical grounding and lack of longitudinal, or long-duration, research methodologies. (patheos.com)
  • The concepts of intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity, mentioned in Part I of this article, play a major role in most social scientific research into religion and health. (patheos.com)
  • A team of researchers led by Steven Pirutinsky of Columbia University trained their investigative lens on the interaction between depression, physical health, and intrinsic religiosity - participating in religion for its own sake, without necessarily expecting social or material rewards - among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews. (patheos.com)
  • Doctors that follow this form of "Christian medicine" typically endorse the apparent health benefits of prayer and fasting, advocated by the Church, while sharing the Church's view of abortion, contraception and homosexuality as grave sins. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Westberg was a pioneer in exploring and encouraging the interrelationship of religion and medicine and in fostering holistic health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Westberg continued focusing on religion and health and a team approach to health care, using strategies such as interdisciplinary case conferences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Siddha medicine is said to have been practiced during the First Sangam, and people "enjoyed mental and bodily health, respecting nature and living hygienically. (wikipedia.org)
  • movement
  • Her ethnographic research on the Great Way of Former Heaven sectarian movement and Cantonese women's vegetarian halls in Singapore in the 1950s was an early contribution to the study of sub-cultural groups in a complex urban society, and she asked insightful questions about the relationship between religion, secularism, and modernity. (universitypressscholarship.com)
  • Christian Science leaders place their religion within mainstream Christian teaching, according to J. Gordon Melton, and reject any identification with the New Thought movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • Amiable and neatly bearded, he wears a rosary on his wrist and long gave up watching TV in order to make time for medicine and voluntary work. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Religion has had positive and negative effects on the development of medicine through time. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • This conference therefore aims to explore the connection between medicine and religion across the time-span of the late medieval and early modern eras, and from an intercultural perspective. (rsa.org)
  • prayer
  • The following passage from the New American Bible (Book of Sirach [Ecclesiasticus] 38:1-15) helps to explain how medicine and prayer are not opposed. (mentalhealth.com)
  • The church does not require that Christian Scientists avoid all medical care-adherents use dentists, optometrists, obstetricians, physicians for broken bones, and vaccination when required by law-but maintains that Christian-Science prayer is most effective when not combined with medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus
  • As the focus is on a primordial deity superior to all other gods, Xiantiandao sects claim to represent a Way (Dào) that transcends, comes before, and thus overcomes all existing religions. (wikipedia.org)
  • various
  • Parents belonging to various religions, in particular Christian Science, have used these exemptions as legal defenses in criminal cases for failing to provide medical care for children who then died. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • Following the death of their son, the Swans left the Christian Science Church, and in 1983, Rita Swan founded the nonprofit organization, Children's Healthcare is a Legal Duty (CHILD), and has worked "relentlessly" to publicize cases of religion-related child abuse and neglect. (wikipedia.org)
  • science
  • Both science and religion offer parts to the whole of reality. (wmich.edu)
  • It is both fascinating and necessary to evaluate the balance and relationship between science and religion. (wmich.edu)
  • Christian Science became the fastest growing religion in the United States, with nearly 270,000 members by 1936, a figure that had declined by 1990 to just over 100,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most significantly, she dismissed the material world as an illusion, rather than as merely subordinate to Mind, leading her to reject the use of medicine, or materia medica, and making Christian Science the most controversial of the metaphysical groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • vol. 1, pp. 886-7 Lutz Richter-Bernburg, Iran's Contribution to Medicine and Veterinary Science in Islam AD 100-900/AD 700-1500", in The Diffusion of Greco-Roman Medicine in the Middle East and the Caucasus, ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • relationship
  • For the Orthodox, intrinsic religion was about a relationship with the Divine, and a good relationship appeared to protect against depression. (patheos.com)
  • stories
  • Also on the show was Jeff Polish, executive director of The Monti , who is curating a storytelling show featuring stories about the intersection of medicine and religion this Friday at the Carolina Theatre. (duke.edu)
  • found
  • An understanding of how to improve patient adherence to treatment plans can also be found through religion. (gvsu.edu)
  • study
  • Among the small group assisting with the catering are a pharmacy student and Ciprian's younger sister, who hopes to study medicine herself. (balkaninsight.com)
  • Institute
  • In 1964 Westberg became the Dean of the Institute of Religion, which was located in the heart of the Texas Medical Center in Houston and linked to five Texas seminaries, providing a graduate program in pastoral care and counseling. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • His commentary on the Hunayn ibn Ishaq's Questions on Medicine, however, may have been even more popular, judging from the large number of copies preserved today. (wikipedia.org)