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  • pesticides
  • Canada has a "Pesticide Risk Reduction Program" where the AAFC (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) and the PMRA (Pest Management Regulatory Agency) work to confront the dangers pesticides pose to the environment and human health. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • Apparatus for multi-dose delivery of preservative-free pharmaceuticals includes a film laminate flexible container for holding and maintaining a sterile drug formulation. (google.com)
  • The Advanced Preservative Free pump is a premium device used for nasal multi-dose applications and is recognised for its high-quality. (pharmaceutical-technology.com)
  • This may be done for medically necessary reasons, such as to change the form of the medication from a solid pill to a liquid, to avoid a non-essential ingredient that the patient is allergic to, or to obtain the exact dose(s) needed or deemed best of particular active pharmaceutical ingredient(s). (wikipedia.org)
  • companies
  • Treatment of chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and others have spurred the demands for sterile injectables, which in turn ensured pharmaceutical companies' domination of the global market. (medgadget.com)
  • In the last decade, substances that may have endocrine effects have been subject to increased regulatory attention, and companies making or using these substances must stay keenly abreast of the sometimes murky and controversial legal and scientific developments regarding endocrine disruptors. (lawbc.com)
  • However, those sources are pharmaceutical companies who manufacture and profit from the sale of vaccines, and permitting them to provide the FDA with their own scientific findings is allowing the fox to guard the hen house. (westonaprice.org)
  • In addition to the FDA not doing its own studies, this governmental regulatory agency recklessly allows pharmaceutical companies to use another vaccine, an aluminum adjuvant or a combination of both as their "placebo. (westonaprice.org)
  • Pharmacists continued to compound most prescriptions until the early 1950s when the majority of dispensed drugs came directly from the large pharmaceutical companies. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the largest generic drug manufacturer in the world and one of the 15 largest pharmaceutical companies worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the 1930s, new immigrants from Europe founded several pharmaceutical companies including Teva ("Nature" in Hebrew), Assia, and Zori. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insulin production from animal pancreases was widespread for decades, but very few patients today rely on insulin from animal sources, largely because few pharmaceutical companies sell it anymore. (wikipedia.org)
  • Drugs
  • Drugs may be covered by multiple patents or regulatory protections. (drugpatentwatch.com)
  • With the isolation of medications from the raw materials or crude drugs came the birth of the modern pharmaceutical company. (wikipedia.org)
  • The book takes particular aim at the pharmaceutical market in the United States during the period, citing extensive lists of drugs which are often the subject of very strong and widespread campaigns of media promotion as "wonder-drugs," yet which do not have any effect on the conditions they purport to cure, and often carry with them serious side effects that are not revealed to consumers. (wikipedia.org)
  • A $1.8 million 2006 Institute of Medicine report on pharmaceutical regulation in the U.S. found major deficiencies in the FDA system for ensuring the safety of drugs on the American market. (wikipedia.org)
  • The economist Milton Friedman has claimed that the regulatory process is inherently biased against approval of some worthy drugs, because the adverse effects of wrongfully banning a useful drug are undetectable, while the consequences of mistakenly approving a harmful drug are highly publicised and that therefore the FDA will take the action that will result in the least public condemnation of the FDA regardless of the health consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • In terms of drugs, adverse events may be defined as: "Any untoward medical occurrence in a patient or clinical investigation subject administered a pharmaceutical product and which does not necessarily have to have a causal relationship with this treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • The R&D team supports all the development process, including changes in formulation, exploration of Impurities, stability stress-tests, up to the manufacturing of registration batches, ICH regulatory stability studies and over. (epmmagazine.com)
  • Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. (B&C ® ) professionals, who include in-house polymer chemists and other scientists, provide clients the legal and scientific know-how to navigate the regulatory process while keeping an eye on the end-goal of consumer appeal. (lawbc.com)
  • allows
  • The close relationship with the regulatory affairs allows a rapid compiling of IMPD/NDA/ANDA or CTD dossiers and delivery to the customer. (epmmagazine.com)
  • drug
  • Attorney Jayne Bultena has almost 20 years of experience in food and drug regulatory matters. (lawbc.com)
  • Pharmaceutical compounding is a branch of pharmacy that continues to play the crucial role of drug development. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Canadian Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialties (CPS), a prescribing reference book for health professionals, mentions tartrazine as a potential allergy for each drug that contains tartrazine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, many officials and government departments, namely, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, have fallen victim to regulatory capture. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1982, Teva was granted approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Kfar Saba manufacturing plant, an essential milestone for marketing pharmaceuticals in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • increase
  • Mylan has already ramped up its production in order to try to meet the increased demand and is aggressively working on both the manufacturing and regulatory fronts to expedite the FDA regulatory approvals necessary to further increase capacity. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Overall, the authors called for an increase in the regulatory powers, funding, and independence of the FDA. (wikipedia.org)
  • safety
  • Layered atop these decisions are a host of regulatory issues, including packaging safety to labeling accuracy. (lawbc.com)
  • market
  • Developing countries, such as China and India, owing to advancements in biotechnology and pharmaceuticals, are emerging as prospective markets and have turned out to be the favorite destination of investment of various market players who are now expanding their operations in these regions. (medgadget.com)
  • paid
  • In June 2013 Teva acquired US firm MicroDose for $40 million with as much as $125 million being paid in regulatory and developmental milestones In 2010, Teva announced that it would build its main distribution center for the Americas in Philadelphia, PA, and was considering opening its US headquarters in the area. (wikipedia.org)
  • affairs
  • IPEC works in collaboration with ExcipientFest to present topics ranging from regulatory affairs to research and development, often featuring speakers from FDA and other pharmaceutical organizations. (wikipedia.org)