• donated sperm
  • Sex selection is allowed for medical reasons-for example to avoid a serious disease that affects only boys recognise same-sex couples as legal parents of children conceived through the use of donated sperm, eggs or embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Regulations were implemented on 1 April 2005 and any donor who donated sperm, eggs or embryos from that date onwards is, by law, identifiable. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the reference within this duty to consider 'the need for a father' has been removed and there are new provisions that will give same-sex couples recognition as the legal parents of children conceived through the use of donated sperm, egg or embryos - although this doesn't seem to extend to two men who may father a child using a surrogate. (ivf.net)
  • gametes
  • The Authority also offers information and advice to people seeking treatment, and to those who have donated gametes or embryos for purposes or activities covered in the Act of 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the subjects under the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act of 1990 are prohibitions in connection with gametes, embryos, and germ cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • Development will ensue normally and after many mitotic divisions, this single cell forms a blastocyst (an early stage embryo with about 100 cells) with an identical genome to the original organism (i.e. a clone). (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells genetically matched the donor organism from which they came.This gives them the ability to create patient specific pluripotent cells, which could then be used in therapies or disease research. (wikipedia.org)
  • After many mitotic divisions in culture, this single cell forms a blastocyst (an early stage embryo with about 100 cells) with almost identical DNA to the original organism. (bootstrike.com)
  • Throughout the ESCR debate, proponents of federal funding have corrupted science by claiming falsely that an embryo in a dish is not really an embryo, meaning not a human organism. (cbc-network.org)
  • For many decades, stem cells have played an important role in medical research, beginning in 1868 when Ernst Haeckel first used the phrase to describe the fertilized egg which eventually gestates into an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • somatic cell nuc
  • In genetics and developmental biology, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a laboratory strategy for creating a viable embryo from a body cell and an egg cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, scientists at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, the University of California San Francisco, the Oregon Health & Science University, Stemagen (La Jolla, CA) and possibly Advanced Cell Technology are currently researching a technique to use somatic cell nuclear transfer to produce embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCNT
  • Another application of SCNT stem cell research is using the patient specific stem cell lines to generate tissues or even organs for transplant into the specific patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only a handful of the labs in the world are currently using SCNT techniques in human stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presently, no human stem cell lines have been derived from SCNT research. (bootstrike.com)
  • In 2005, a South Korean research team led by Professor Hwang Woo-suk, published claims to have derived stem cell lines via SCNT, but supported those claims with fabricated data. (bootstrike.com)
  • The impetus for SCNT-based stem cell research has been decreased by the development and improvement of alternative methods of generating stem cells. (bootstrike.com)
  • The following year, this method achieved a key goal of SCNT-based stem cell research: the derivation of pluripotent stem cell lines that have all genes linked to various diseases. (bootstrike.com)
  • Some scientists working on SCNT-based stem cell research have recently moved to the new methods of induced pluripotent stem cells. (bootstrike.com)
  • It was created using SCNT - a nucleus was taken from a man's leg cell and inserted into a cow's egg from which the nucleus had been removed, and the hybrid cell was cultured, and developed into an embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2008, Dr. Andrew French and Samuel Wood of the biotechnology company Stemagen announced that they successfully created the first five mature human embryos using SCNT. (wikipedia.org)
  • mammalian
  • ECs were first thought to arise from extraembryonic tissues because blood vessels were observed in the avian and mammalian embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a non-simultaneous process that occurs primarily postnatally in mammalian species, beginning in the embryo during the midst of early development and finishing after birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • donor
  • In 2004, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (Disclosure of Donor Information) Regulations 2004/1511, enabled donor-conceived children to access the identity of their sperm, egg or embryo donor upon reaching the age of 18. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a survey of IVF clinics published in 2005, researchers found only one Canadian IVF clinic used donor consent documents that would make their 'leftover' embryos eligible for stem cell research under to the law (clinics are the only place researchers can obtain embryos). (imfcanada.org)
  • The donor can donate for research purposes or fertility treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • desirable
  • A designer baby is a human embryo which has been genetically modified, usually following guidelines set by the parent or scientist, to produce desirable traits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conversely, this technique can also help select for desirable traits by avoiding implanting embryos with genes that have serious diseases or disabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • The RCBE and the Linacre Centre for Healthcare Ethics told the parliamentary committee who are scrutinising the draft Bill: 'At the very least, embryos with a preponderance of human genes should be assumed to be embryonic human beings, and should be treated accordingly. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Shortly following this, another research paper was published indicating the HBBP1 gene exhibited the more genetic regulatory connections in the various regions of the globin-gene cluster than the other beta-globin genes. (icr.org)
  • A notable advance in synthetic biology occurred in 2000, when two articles in Nature discussed the creation of synthetic biological circuit devices of a genetic toggle switch and a biological clock by combining genes within E. coli cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The PGD procedures allow scientist to identify damaged or mutated genes associated with diseases in the oocytes or embryos by using in-situ hybridization (ISH). (wikipedia.org)
  • Tilghman's work in molecular genetics focused on the regulation of genes during development, particularly in the field of genomic imprinting. (wikipedia.org)
  • She was a leader in the use of mice to understand the behavior of genes by researching the effect of gene insertion in embryonic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • OLIG1 controls regulation in several myelin related genes, while suppressing others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human Fertilisa
  • Current restrictions on the use of data collected by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) will also be changed, in order to make it easier to do follow-up research on the children born following assisted conception. (ivf.net)
  • In the United Kingdom, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has granted permission to research groups at the Roslin Institute and the Newcastle Centre for Life. (bootstrike.com)
  • It created the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority which is in charge of human embryo research, along with monitoring and licensing fertility clinics in the United Kingdom. (wikipedia.org)
  • This act established the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) to regulate treatment and research in the UK involving human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • blastocyst
  • At the present time, the production of new cell lines involves destruction of preimplantation embryos at the 100-200 cell (blastocyst) stage. (jci.org)
  • The embryos were developed only to the blastocyst stage, at which point they were studied in processes that destroyed them. (wikipedia.org)
  • avian
  • Avian gastrulation is a process by which developing cells in an avian embryo move relative to one another in order to form the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). (wikipedia.org)
  • The primitive streak develops from Koller's sickle and the epiblast of the avian embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells migrate by entering through the dorsal side and moving toward the ventral side of the avian embryo, separating the left and right sections of the embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • The discovery of adult stem cells led scientists to develop an interest in the role of embryonic stem cells, and in separate studies in 1981 Gail Martin and Martin Evans derived pluripotent stem cells from the embryos of mice for the first time. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990
  • The Bill is designed to update and reform the existing laws on assisted conception and human embryo research in the UK, established by the 1990 Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act, although it will not alter the existing model of regulation and will remain based on the basic foundations of the law as it currently stands. (ivf.net)
  • MPs voted to allow medical research on hybrid human-animal embryos last night, in the first of a series of votes on the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill aimed at updating laws from 1990 in line with scientific advances. (indcatholicnews.com)
  • They are in charge of reviewing information about human embryos and subsequent development, provision of treatment services, and activities governed by the Act of 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dickey-Wicker Amendment
  • 2009).) Indeed, the Dickey-Wicker Amendment does not contain any language to support such a limited definition of research. (cbc-network.org)
  • In August 2010, as part of preliminary motions in Sherley vs Sebelius, Judge Royce C. Lamberth granted an injunction against federally funded embryonic stem cell (ESC) research on the grounds that the guidelines for ESC research "clearly violate" the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 2-1 opinion of April 29, 2011, the appeals panel said that the Dickey-Wicker Amendment was "ambiguous" and that the National Institutes of Health had "reasonably concluded" that although federal funds could not be used to directly destroy an embryo, the amendment does not prohibit funding a research project using embryonic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • bioethics
  • On December 1 the special parliamentary commission in charge of examining the draft revision to the French bioethics law devoted the first of a series of round-table discussions to the topic of research on human embryos. (catholiclane.com)
  • Such research was forbidden by the initial bioethics legislation passed in France in 1994 and by the first revision to the law in 1999. (catholiclane.com)
  • 2001
  • Research leaves in 2000-2001 and 2004-5, supported by an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, gave me as a scholar of German foreign policy and European integration an opportunity to delve into a new topic area. (scribd.com)
  • procedure
  • Finally, on January 12, 2011, hearings were held in an appeal to the Court of Justice of the European Communities to debate the definition of "human embryo" and to determine whether a procedure for deriving nerve cells from embryonic stem cells can be patented under EU regulations. (catholiclane.com)
  • The aim of carrying out this procedure is to obtain pluripotent cells from a cloned embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also addresses licensing conditions, code of practice, and procedure of approval involving human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • The IVF procedure is carried out by the removal of one or two cells when the embryo is at a specific stage in development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists
  • How far should scientists be allowed to go in creating things that resemble primitive human brains, hearts, and even human embryos? (wkms.org)
  • Scientists are reporting the results of controversial experiments that they say are encouraging them to continue to try to develop embryos that are part-human and part-animal. (wkms.org)
  • The Obama administration has dropped a controversial proposal that would have required all federally funded scientists to get permission from patients before using their cells, blood, tissue or DNA for research. (wkms.org)
  • I have watched scientists tell legislators that embryos aren't human organisms, but a mere "ball of cells" or a "fertilized egg," everything but chopped liver. (cbc-network.org)
  • There are many scientists who believe that these NIH guidelines are unacceptable and unnecessarily shut off research that are not prohibited by law. (rutgers.edu)
  • Much more research is needed in order for scientists to understand how stem cells work and how they may be used to produce treatments for Parkinson's and many other medical conditions. (eu.com)
  • development
  • Since the first isolation of usable stem cells, tremendous scientific interest has flourished over the potential of stem cell research to improve our understanding of human development and disease and potentially for cell-based therapies to cure a wide range of diseases. (spusa.org)
  • Pre-implantation embryos at this stage of development are called blastocysts, hollow microscopic balls of cells. (spusa.org)
  • One of these chains is called the 'alpha-globin' which remains the same from embryo development to adulthood. (icr.org)
  • The stem cell controversy is the consideration of the ethics of research involving the development, use, and destruction of human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • While a single gene has not been isolated for the creation of Koller's sickle, there is evidence that the Homeobox gene Hex influences Koller's sickle development. (wikipedia.org)
  • These processes are all necessary for the development of an embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • frozen
  • The new Spanish law allows existing frozen embryos - of which there are estimated to be tens of thousands in Spain - to be kept for patient's future use, donated for another infertile couple, or used in research. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2003, Spain's laws state that embryos left over from IVF and donated by the couple that created them can be used in research, including ES cell research, if they have been frozen for more than five years. (wikipedia.org)
  • DH & I have 3 frozen embryos to donate to the right person/couple. (ivf-infertility.com)
  • meds, monitoring, ET, &/or shipping costs to have the frozen embryos sent to your clinic) If you are interested, please tell us as much about yourself as possible. (ivf-infertility.com)
  • implantation
  • But some science organizations have changed the definition of the embryo to require implantation. (cbc-network.org)
  • Raising high the roof beams, Jeffry and Cristen's Christmas card showed a picture of an embryo, a one-day-old six-cell floating clover leaf in its pre-implantation petri-dish exile. (thomaslarson.com)
  • prohibitions
  • This is very important because such prohibitions will prevent very important research based on misunderstandings of what human cells do when they are transplanted into animals. (rutgers.edu)
  • outlaw the creation
  • The House of Commons Science and Technology Committee's report, 'Government Proposals for the Regulation of Hybrid and Chimera Embryos', is its response to two related events: firstly the UK Government's intention to outlaw the creation of such entities, announced in December 2006 in its White Paper (1), and secondly the. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Tory MP Edward Leigh's attempt to outlaw the creation of hybrid human-animal embryos was voted down by 336 votes to 176. (indcatholicnews.com)
  • researchers
  • Around the world, researchers and politicians have struggled to develop guidelines that will allow for ethical and socially responsible stem cell research. (spusa.org)
  • At this time researchers are still uncertain of what clinical differences may exist between iPS cells and embryonic stem cells, meaning that, at this time, further research on both kinds of stem cells is necessary to fully understand the medical potential of these new discoveries. (spusa.org)
  • It is about the ethical issues and policy challenges that arise in the context of researchers and clinicians doing new things with embryos. (scribd.com)
  • The researchers then analyzed the HBBP1 pseudogene region for gene-function data, related to the ENCODE project, 2, 3 and found that it is actively associated with transcriptional (gene control) regulation in conjunction with the LCR region that controls the whole beta-globin gene cluster. (icr.org)
  • Some stem cell researchers are working to develop techniques of isolating stem cells that are as potent as embryonic stem cells, but do not require a human embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • stage
  • The embryo-to-adult growth stage expression of each gene in the cluster depends on that specific gene's interaction with a control region preceding the whole cluster called the 'locus control region' or LCR. (icr.org)
  • Only cells from an embryo at the morula stage or earlier are truly totipotent, meaning that they are able to form all cell types including placental cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • This only concerns human embryos which have reached the two cell zygote stage, at which they are considered "fertilised" in the act. (wikipedia.org)
  • Significantly
  • Significantly, neither the embryos themselves nor their mothers or fathers figure as individuals in any of these stories. (catholiclane.com)
  • However, spinal cord related oligodendrocytes demonstrated a significantly smaller need of OLIG1 regulation in order to begin myelination. (wikipedia.org)
  • primitive
  • The primitive groove forms as a depression in the primitive streak as it is developing, and allows a space for migrating cells to move into the deeper layers of the embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • Play media In C. elegans, a series of asymmetric cell divisions in the early embryo are critical in setting up the anterior/posterior, dorsal/ventral, and left/right axes of the body plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • draft
  • The draft Bill imposes a strict 14 day time limit on the use of these entities in research, at which point they must be destroyed. (bionews.org.uk)
  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is requesting public comment on draft guidelines, entitled "National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research" . (rutgers.edu)
  • These draft guidelines were created in response to Executive Order 13505 by President Barack Obama , requesting that NIH establish policy and procedures under which NIH will fund research in the area in accordance to applicable law. (rutgers.edu)
  • viable
  • this approach has been championed as an answer to the many issues concerning embryonic stem cells (ESC) and the destruction of viable embryos for medical use, though questions remain on how homologous the two cell types truly are. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research is needed to determine the most viable stem cell lines and reliable ways to promote the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into specific cell types (neurons, muscle cells, etc. (jci.org)
  • stem cell lines
  • The inner cell mass is extracted from the embryo and cultured in a nutrient rich environment in a Petri dish in order to create stem cell lines. (spusa.org)
  • Germany has restrictive policies for stem cell research, but a 2008 law authorizes "the use of imported stem cell lines produced before May 1, 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • Italy has a 2004 law that forbids all sperm or egg donations and the freezing of embryos, but allows, in effect, using existing stem cell lines that have been imported. (wikipedia.org)