• pathogens
  • More importantly, we might be able to use this knowledge of the paradigms of pathogenesis to develop novel strategies for combating some of today's most significant bacterial pathogens. (frontiersin.org)
  • With the tremendous amount of information that has been generated by the genomics revolution, it is not surprising that new paradigms for the evolution of bacterial pathogens have emerged. (frontiersin.org)
  • She completed her Bachelor of Science (Honours) in 2001 in the Monash University Department of Microbiology, where she conducted research into the gene regulation of one of the bacterial pathogens responsible for meningitis in humans, Neisseria meningitidis. (wikipedia.org)

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  • protein
  • A knockout of the dam gene in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans resulted in dysregulated levels of the protein, leukotoxin, and also reduced the microbe's ability to invade oral epithelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • PcrZ (photosynthesis control RNA Z) identified in R. sphaeroides, is a trans-acting sRNA which counteracts the redox-dependent induction of photosynthesis genes, mediated by protein regulators. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2002, the first comprehensive proofs of multiple classes of riboswitches were published, including protein-free binding assays, and metabolite-binding riboswitches were established as a new mechanism of gene regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • fis is the E. coli gene encoding FIS protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fis has been deemed a bacterial chromatin architectural protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • HU is a small (10 kDa) bacterial histone-like protein that resembles the eukaryotic Histone H2B. (wikipedia.org)
  • coli
  • Researcher Yoshizumi Ishino and colleagues published their findings on the sequence of a gene called "iap" and its relation to E. coli. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous sRNAs have been identified using both computational analysis and laboratory-based techniques such as Northern blotting, microarrays and RNA-Seq in a number of bacterial species including Escherichia coli, the model pathogen Salmonella, the nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, marine cyanobacteria, Francisella tularensis (the causative agent of tularaemia), Streptococcus pyogenes, the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, and the plant pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolic
  • Prior to the discovery of riboswitches, the mechanism by which some genes involved in multiple metabolic pathways were regulated remained mysterious. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some cis-acting sRNAs act as riboswitches, which have receptors for specific environmental or metabolic signals and activate or repress genes based on these signals. (wikipedia.org)
  • mRNA
  • As such, regulation of an RppH-like activity, and subsequent RNase J1 5' exonuclease activity, could be a mechanism by which mRNA half-life is controlled, similar to the regulation of the decapping step in eukaryotes [ 10 - 12 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • RNAs
  • Bacterial small RNAs have been identified as components of many regulatory networks. (wikipedia.org)
  • These data included conserved RNA secondary structures often found in the untranslated regions (UTRs) of the relevant genes and the success of procedures to create artificial small molecule-binding RNAs called aptamers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Streptococcus
  • Additionally a study on Dam methylase deficient Streptococcus mutans, a dental pathogen, revealed the dysregulation of a 103 genes some of which include cariogenic potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacterium
  • Generally, a single avirulence gene (in the bacterium) corresponds to a single resistance gene (in the plant host), giving rise to the concept of a gene-for-gene response. (wikipedia.org)
  • cleavage
  • However, unlike all other such genes, metabolite binding to the glmS UTR does not induce transcription termination or translational regulation but induces autocatalytic cleavage at a 5'-proximal site, leaving a downstream fragment with a 5'-hydroxyl end [ 6 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • photosynthetic
  • The regulation of its photosynthetic machinery is of great interest to researchers, as R. sphaeroides has an intricate system for sensing O2 tensions. (wikipedia.org)
  • When successful, the common symptoms of bacterial blight will be seen, with the main effect on the plant being a reduction in photosynthetic leaf area. (wikipedia.org)
  • strains
  • Eight genes, phlHGFACBDE, are annotated in this cluster and conserved organizationally in 2,4-DAPG-producing strains of P. fluorescens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phylogenetic and genomic analysis, though, has revealed that the entire phl gene cluster is ancestral to P. fluorescens, many strains have lost the capacity, and it exists on different genomic regions among strains. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • For the last three decades, FQs played an important role in treatment of serious bacterial infections, especially hospital-acquired infections. (hindawi.com)
  • occurs
  • Following ingestion of the bacterial cells mussel death occurs following lysis and necrosis of the digestive gland and sloughing of stomach epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • sequence
  • Epigenetics is the study of stable heritable changes in gene function that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence . (wikipedia.org)
  • Salmonella
  • The retainment of viability despite a dam gene knockout is also seen in Salmonella and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • RNase J1, an essential ribonuclease, is now known to have not only endonuclease activity but also the long-missing bacterial 5'-to-3' exonuclease activity [ 1 ]. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • It is now known that most bacterial sRNAs are encoded by free-standing genes located in the intergenic regions (IGR) between two known genes. (wikipedia.org)