• compounds
  • A major goal in the field of diversity-oriented synthesis is the efficient production of small-molecule libraries that address underexploited regions of biologically relevant chemical space to enable the discovery of new biological probes and potential therapeutic lead compounds ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • Organisations involved in the search for new drugs need a range of chemical compounds to test against their biological assays. (ukspa.org.uk)
  • Glenn Crocker, chief executive of BioCity Group added: "Around 35% of early stage drug discovery projects in both industry and academia fail at the hit stage due to the poor structural properties of the compounds found through biological testing, which means there is no value to progressing these any further. (ukspa.org.uk)
  • In general, the presence of anything that might have harmful biological activity, such as heavy metals, closely related compounds, or solvents, is controlled in pharmaceuticals, and there may even be biological assays as well as the chemical assays. (yarchive.net)
  • Chromagen will develop biological assays and screen CombiChem compounds, while receiving research support and a percentage of future payments received by CombiChem upon outlicensing of drug candidates. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The colloidal metal conjugates can be used in devices for qualitative, semi-quantitative, or quantitative determination of the presence of compounds in samples, including biological samples. (patentgenius.com)
  • Like the other compounds, it has also been shown to be reactive in many different assays of biological activities, raising the possibility that any drug generated from fisetin would have too many side effects to be useful. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the global emission of bioconcentratable persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was shown to result in adverse ecological effects, industry developed a wide range of increasing water-soluble, polar hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs) to replace them. (wikipedia.org)
  • radioactive
  • Essential aspects of binding assays include, but are not limited to, the concentration level of reactants or products (see radioactive section), maintaining the equilibrium constant of reactants throughout the assay, and the reliability and validity of linked reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • Native heparin is a polymer with a molecular weight ranging from 3 kDa to 40 kDa, although the average molecular weight of most commercial heparin preparations is in the range of 12 kDa to 15 kDa. (askdefine.com)
  • The Canadian team of organic chemists and enzymologists developed drug design motifs, and pursued preparative chemistry, enzymology, molecular biology, and tissue culture studies that were interfaced with biological assays and pharmacokinetic studies carried out in Syntex, Palo Alto, CA. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Traditionally genotyping is the use of DNA sequences to define biological populations by use of molecular tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quenching and dequenching upon interaction with a specific molecular biological target is the basis for activatable optical contrast agents for molecular imaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dexter energy transfer is a short-range phenomenon that falls off exponentially with distance (proportional to e−kR where k is a constant that depends on the inverse of the van der Waals radius of the atom[citation needed]) and depends on spatial overlap of donor and quencher molecular orbitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Searching the databases is possible for a broad range of properties including chemical structure, name fragments, chemical formula, molecular weight, XLogP, and hydrogen bond donor and acceptor count. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • A diverse and large set of data ranging from chemistry leads to biological assays and protein sequencing will now be managed and analysed through the Dotmatics Platform. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A thermal shift assay quantifies the change in thermal denaturation temperature of a protein under varying conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each method has its strengths and weaknesses but they all struggle with intrinsically disordered proteins without any clearly defined tertiary structure as the essence of a thermal shift assay is measuring the temperature at which a protein goes from well-defined structure to disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • In addition to the bovine and porcine tissue from which pharmaceutical-grade heparin is commonly extracted, it has also been extracted and characterised from: Turkey Whale Dromedary camel Mouse Humans Lobster Fresh water mussel Clam Shrimp Mangrove crab Sand dollar Atlantic salmon Zebra fish The biological activity of heparin within species 6-11 is unclear and further supports the idea that the main physiological role of heparin is not anticoagulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentration
  • In comparison to the previous over-coated plate-based methods, SPA has a number of advantages that makes it more popular: Assay flexibility - the concentration of the components in the assay can be adjusted to suit the user due to the higher surface area design of the SPA beads, hence providing the user flexibility in designing assay. (wikipedia.org)
  • specific
  • QIAGEN's assays for CNS disorders focus on specific diseases as well as nervous system biology, inflammation, and stress responses. (qiagen.com)
  • methods
  • Studies are screened, and only those assays using standardized methods and resulting in significant effects are used for the determination of ERL/ERM guidelines. (wikipedia.org)
  • The thermofluor assay was the first high-throughput thermal shift assay and its utility and limitations has spurred the invention of a plethora of alternate methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • Although biological assays have been the cornerstone of endocrinologic measurements, the development of the radioimmunoassay (RIA) completely changed the field of endocrinology (1). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Through the development of RIA technology, researchers have been able to move beyond the use of radioactivity, and instead, use liquid- and solid-phase, competitive, and immunoradiometric assays. (wikipedia.org)
  • complex
  • In analogy to digital microelectronics, these basic instructions can be combined and reused within hierarchical design structures so that complex procedures (e.g. chemical synthesis or biological assays) can be built up step-by-step. (wikipedia.org)
  • dose
  • Its typical vaporized dose is 5-20 mg, while DMTs dosage range is somewhere around 20-70 mg. (wikipedia.org)
  • although
  • Although binding assays are simple, they fail to provide information on whether or not the compound being tested affects the target's function. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • The use of the technology will range from in security applications, environmental monitoring to epidemiological studies. (washington.edu)
  • provides
  • This report provides an update on BIO048B Biological Therapies for Cancer: Technologies and Global Markets. (bccresearch.com)
  • QIAGEN provides a range of assays to study metabolism and metabolic disorders. (qiagen.com)
  • In addition to serving as a biorepository and distributor, ATCC provides specialized services as a biological resource center. (wikipedia.org)
  • ATCC also provides biological repository management services to institutions, agencies and companies wishing to outsource the handling of their own culture collections. (wikipedia.org)
  • bind
  • Indeed, alkaloid and terpenoid cores are prevalent among privileged scaffolds able to bind multiple biological targets ( 6 ), and a variety of alkaloid- and terpenoid-based libraries have been reported ( 7 - 11 ). (pnas.org)
  • measure
  • Some newer types are called "mix-and-measure" assays because they do not require separation of bound ligands. (wikipedia.org)
  • modern
  • The volumetric dynamic ranges involved in modern biological assays can also flummox human operators: no technician's eyesight is sufficiently acute to determine the dispensing accuracy of a two-microliter aliquot. (labmanager.com)
  • structural
  • A series of enyne and diyne substrates is assembled using a tert -butylsulfinamide lynchpin that affords asymmetric induction, a uniquely suited reactivity pattern, and an unusual structural motif for biological evaluation ( 14 ). (pnas.org)
  • technology
  • The technology is simple, fast and insensitive to variations in sample volumes, and the useful temperature and pH range is 30- 80°C and 5-11 respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • optical
  • The metal particle can allow the binding to be visualized in an assay by optical or electronic means, including, for example, visual or spectrophotometric observation of color imparted by the size, composition and shape of the metalparticle. (patentgenius.com)