• Moon's
  • The Moon probably has a liquid core of about 20% of the Moon's radius. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Moon's mass is 7.3 x 10^22 kg, its radius is 1.79 x 10^6 m, and its orbital period around Earth is 27.3 days. (jiskha.com)
  • This does not mean that, as a result of the precession of the Moon's orbital plane, the angle between the lunar equator and the ecliptic would vary between the sum (11.833°) and difference (1.543°) of these two angles, but, as was discovered by Jacques Cassini in 1722, the rotational axis of the Moon precesses with the same rate as its orbital plane, but is 180° out of phase (see Cassini's Laws). (wikipedia.org)
  • Microgravity
  • While lifting weights can strengthen the arms, weighted vest or backpacks producing an Earth-like weight to be carried by their hindlimbs would strengthen the legs which are normally physiologically weakened under microgravity and low gravity environments. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • Surface
  • Surface gravity derived from the mass m, the gravitational constant G and the radius r: Gm/r2. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pharos is the only named surface feature on this moon: the name is Greek and refers to the island where Proteus reigned. (wikipedia.org)
  • Luna 1 missed the Moon, but Luna 2 made a hard landing (impact) into its surface, and became the first artificial object on an extraterrestrial body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effects of a number of impact parameters, including impactor size, surface gravity and target temperature, on the cratering process are also highlighted. (usra.edu)
  • What is the surface gravity on this star? (mathhelpforum.com)
  • The presence of water ice is supported by spectroscopic observations, which have revealed crystalline water ice on the surface of the moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the presence of canyons suggests early endogenic processes, and the moon may have undergone an early endogenically driven resurfacing event that obliterated its older surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence of water ice is supported by infrared spectroscopic observations, which have revealed crystalline water ice on the surface of the moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • orbits
  • Proteus orbits Neptune at the distance approximately equal to 4.75 equatorial radii of the planet. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Moon orbits Earth in the prograde direction and completes one revolution relative to the stars in about 27.323 days (a sidereal month) and one revolution relative to the Sun in about 29.530 days (a synodic month). (wikipedia.org)
  • A property of coelliptic orbits is that the difference in magnitude between aligned radius vectors is nearly the same, regardless of where within the orbits they are positioned. (wikipedia.org)
  • An exomoon or extrasolar moon is a natural satellite that orbits an exoplanet or other non-stellar extrasolar body. (wikipedia.org)
  • mass
  • Escape velocity derived from the mass m, the gravitational constant G and the radius r: √2Gm/r. (wikipedia.org)
  • But if the hypothesis that light elements actually evaporated from Moon rocks during their formation is correct, you'd expect to find evidence of elements being layered by mass - heavier elements would condense first, and so on. (slashdot.org)
  • Its mass is 7020617000000000000♠6.17×1020 kg(0.000103 Earth mass), which is less than 1% of the Moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, if it is differentiated, the radius of the core does not exceed 145 km, and its mass is below 6% of the total mass. (wikipedia.org)
  • With half the diameter and one eighth the mass of Pluto, it is a very large moon in comparison to its parent body. (wikipedia.org)
  • I know the moon has pretty significant mass concentration anomalies, which thankfully have all been mapped. (physicsforums.com)
  • A typical white dwarf star, which was once an average star like our sun but is now in the last stage of its evolution, is the size of our moon but has the mass of our sun. (mathhelpforum.com)
  • Apollo
  • Lasers on Earth are aimed at retroreflectors planted on the Moon during the Apollo program (11, 14, and 15) and the two Lunokhod missions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gauge freedom plays a major role in a correct physical interpretation of the relativistic effects in the Earth-Moon system observed with LLR technique Apollo 14 Lunar Ranging Retro Reflector (LRRR). (wikipedia.org)
  • Until we went to the Moon via Apollo and found the subtle differences in composition of the rocks, when compared to Earth, the leading theory was that it formed simultaneously with Earth as a kind of dual planet. (slashdot.org)
  • Acceleration
  • The likelihood of any "Nordtvedt effect" (a differential acceleration of the Moon and Earth towards the Sun caused by their different degrees of compactness) has been ruled out to high precision, strongly supporting the validity of the Strong Equivalence Principle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pluto
  • In September 2016, astronomers announced that the reddish-brown cap of the north pole of Charon is composed of tholins, organic macromolecules that may be essential ingredients of life, and produced from methane, nitrogen and related gases released from the atmosphere of Pluto and transferred over about 19,000 km (12,000 mi) distance to the orbiting moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • comet
  • 7th century BC - Egyptian astronomers alleged to have predicted a solar eclipse 613 BC, July - A Comet, possibly Comet Halley, is recorded in Spring and Autumn Annals by the Chinese 586 BC - Thales of Miletus alleged to have predicted a solar eclipse c. 450 BC: Anaxagoras shows that the Moon shines by reflected sunlight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Earth
  • The ongoing Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment measures the distance between Earth and the Moon using laser ranging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nonetheless, the Earth-Moon distance has been measured with increasing accuracy for more than 35 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2002[update], work is progressing on increasing the accuracy of the Earth-Moon measurements to near millimeter accuracy, though the performance of the reflectors continues to degrade with age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the findings of this long-term experiment are: The Moon is spiraling away from Earth at a rate of 3.8 cm per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • New evidence that the giant impact hypothesis is correct: A paper published today in Nature shares findings of a chemical analysis of Moon rocks that shows fractional differences between the makeup of the Earth and Moon that most likely were caused by the collision between Earth and a Mars-sized planet around 4.5 billion years ago. (slashdot.org)
  • They compared the blend of zinc isotopes in Moon rocks and Earth samples, and found that the Moon rocks held slightly higher proportions of heavier zinc isotopes. (slashdot.org)
  • If the Moon was indeed once part of Earth - which has been shown by extensive modeling (PDF) - the difference in the balance of zinc profiles would most likely be explained by lighter zinc isotopes evaporating away following a collision. (slashdot.org)
  • Because of its proximity to Earth, the Moon has been seen as the most obvious natural expansion after Earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Responding to the Soviet program of space exploration, US President John F. Kennedy in 1961 told the U.S. Congress on May 25: "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simulation work published in 2005 by Robin Canup suggested that Charon could have been formed by a collision around 4.5 billion years ago, much like Earth and the Moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • The radius of Earth is 6.38 X 10^6 m. a. (jiskha.com)
  • The radius of Earth is about 6400 km. (jiskha.com)
  • The moon is receding from the Earth by approximately 3.8 cm per year. (jiskha.com)
  • In both cases, the Moon is in syzygy, that is, the Sun, Moon and Earth are nearly aligned. (wikipedia.org)
  • shadows cross when nodes coincide with full and new moon when the Sun, Earth, and Moon align in three dimensions. (wikipedia.org)
  • For nearly fifty years following their discovery, Titania and Oberon would not be observed by any instrument other than William Herschel's, although the moon can be seen from Earth with a present-day high-end amateur telescope. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In 2016 Johann-Dietrich Wörner, the new Chief of ESA, proposed the International Moon Village that incorporates 3D printing. (wikipedia.org)
  • artificial
  • This suggest that crewed interplanetary missions requiring several months of space travel may require interplanetary vehicles capable of producing artificial gravity during the journey. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • celestial
  • 1959 - Luna 3 sends the first images of another celestial body, the Moon, from space, including its unseen far side. (wikipedia.org)
  • approximately
  • The moon consists of approximately equal amounts of ice and rock, and is probably differentiated into a rocky core and an icy mantle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mars
  • But there are still others who believe that low gravity worlds such as the Moon and Mars could be utilized as near term destinations for human colonization. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • However, if the lower gravity of the Moon or Mars turns out to seriously effect the long term fertility of humans then daily exposure to-- hypergravity-- through short armed centrifuges may be a possible solution. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • Short radius hypergravity centrifuge could help to mitigate the possibility of infertility on lower gravity worlds such as the Moon and Mars. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • So it seems logical that rigorous exercise should enable humans to mitigate or even eliminate significant bone mineral loss under the hypogravity conditions of the Moon and Mars. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • Within pressurized habitats on the Moon an Mars, heavily weighted vest could be worn throughout the day, providing exercise for the leg muscles when standing, walking, running and jumping. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • small
  • The authors found detecting satellite signals in lensing light curves will be very difficult because the signals are seriously smeared out by the severe finite-source effect even for events involved with source stars with small angular radii. (wikipedia.org)
  • Force
  • It envisaged a 21-airman underground Air Force base on the Moon by 1968 at a total cost of $7.5 billion. (wikipedia.org)
  • planet
  • In 1638 Bishop John Wilkins wrote A Discourse Concerning a New World and Another Planet, in which he predicted a human colony on the Moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oberon, also designated Uranus IV, is the outermost major moon of the planet Uranus. (wikipedia.org)
  • center
  • After reaching its maximum volume, fractured and displaced material on the crater walls slumps under gravity into the crater center creating a breccia lens. (usra.edu)
  • suggests
  • Although the two are quite similar, it's been previously shown that Moon rocks lack volatile elements, which suggests they may have evaporated during the incredibly intense heat and pressure created during an impact event. (slashdot.org)
  • axis
  • Therefore, the angle between the ecliptic and the lunar equator is always 1.543°, even though the rotational axis of the Moon is not fixed with respect to the stars. (wikipedia.org)
  • probe
  • There are no active plans at present to return to study the moon in more detail, although various concepts such as a Uranus orbiter and probe have been proposed from time to time. (wikipedia.org)
  • below
  • When the sun is the furthest below the horizon (winter solstice), the moon will be full when it is at its highest point. (wikipedia.org)
  • Space
  • There are also various projects planned for the near future by space tourism startup companies for tourism on the Moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • In November 2017 the International Space University hosted a conference that led to the formation of the Moon Village Association. (wikipedia.org)
  • These industries will take advantage of the unique low-gravity, high vacuum conditions in space to create high-value products such as pharmaceuticals and biological products, exotic crystals and semiconductors. (ssi.org)
  • Time
  • In 1959, John S. Rinehart suggested that the safest design would be a structure that could "[float] in a stationary ocean of dust", since there were, at the time this concept was outlined, theories that there could be mile-deep dust oceans on the Moon. (wikipedia.org)
  • make
  • Having some gravity could make it possible for people to use heavily weighted vest or backpacks in order to avoid bone mineral loss while maintaining their Earthling strength-- even without daily strenuous exercise. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • body
  • Obviously the FSM, his spaghetiness be praised, was the one who created the moon by spontaneously generating a meatball and applying his large-body creation sauce to it. (slashdot.org)
  • although
  • In the past, however, it may have been in a 5:3 resonance with Miranda, which could have been partially responsible for the heating of that moon (although the maximum heating attributable to a former 1:3 resonance of Umbriel with Miranda was likely about three times greater). (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • Tethys was discovered by Giovanni Domenico Cassini in 1684 together with Dione, another moon of Saturn. (wikipedia.org)