• higher radon
  • If your home does contain higher radon levels than what is considered safe for human exposure, eliminating it could potentially save your life. (radonsystem.com)
  • In that study, the authors measured actual exposure and outcomes of about 57,000 Danes and found the "adjusted [risk] for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m^3 higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. (wmbriggs.com)
  • The finding of no effect was contrary to expectations, so the authors said, "In the present study, a number of risk factors for lung cancer were less prevalent among participants living at the higher radon concentrations, including…low fruit intake, risk occupation and traffic-related air pollution. (wmbriggs.com)
  • radioactivity
  • Due to its intense radioactivity, which results in the radiolysis of chemical bonds and radioactive self-heating, its chemistry has mostly been investigated on the trace scale only. (wikipedia.org)
  • She was a pioneer in the field of radioactivity , the only person honored with Nobel Prizes in two different sciences, and the first female professor at the University of Paris . (blogspot.com)
  • They then attempted to separate these radioactive fractions further, to isolate a smaller fraction with a higher specific activity (radioactivity divided by mass). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ernest Rutherford, working in Canada and England, showed that radioactive decay can be described by a simple equation (a linear first degree derivative equation, now called first order kinetics), implying that a given radioactive substance has a characteristic "half-life" (the time taken for the amount of radioactivity present in a source to diminish by half). (wikipedia.org)
  • unstable
  • The radioactive oganesson atom is very unstable, and since 2005, only five (possibly six) atoms of the nuclide 294Og have been detected. (wikipedia.org)
  • heavier
  • It was 80 years from Bohr's prediction before oganesson was successfully synthesised, although its chemical properties have not been investigated to determine if it behaves as the heavier congener of radon. (wikipedia.org)
  • particles
  • Many of these kits use charcoal or foam to collect radioactive particles that may be floating in the air. (radonsystem.com)
  • The entrance of radon particles through gaps in the plumbing system and cracks in the ground is a huge concern. (nicholasregush.com)
  • In this technique air at a very high pressure is aimed at the poisoned water body and is thoroughly mixed which makes the radon particles settle down leaving the water clean again. (nicholasregush.com)
  • It filters the radon particles from the water body before use. (nicholasregush.com)
  • atom
  • Under him, Nobel Prizes were awarded to James Chadwick for discovering the neutron (in 1932), John Cockcroft and Ernest Walton for an experiment which was to be known as splitting the atom using a particle accelerator, and Edward Appleton for demonstrating the existence of the ionosphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • accumulate
  • Studies have concluded that radon gas can accumulate to a higher concentration in low areas, such as basements and crawl spaces and is now found in some spring water and hot springs. (guardianlv.com)
  • nuclear
  • The rate at which nuclear disintegrations occur in a radioactive material. (gc.ca)
  • It also includes the study and use of nuclear processes in non-radioactive areas of human activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • To an ardent greenie, nuclear free means a prohibition of anything involving radioactive materials, even banning the transport of radiopharmaceuticals for use in medical treatment. (scribd.com)
  • contamination
  • Poorly ventilated rooms, of course, fill with radon gas the most quickly, but any building can be vulnerable to radon contamination. (radonsystem.com)
  • Fernald came under criticism in 1984 when it was learned that the plant was releasing millions of pounds of uranium dust into the atmosphere, causing major radioactive contamination of the surrounding areas. (wikipedia.org)