• BMAA
  • Sacks and Paul Alan Cox subsequently wrote that a local species of flying fox, which is now extinct due to overhunting, had been feeding on cycads and concentrating β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a known neurotoxin, in its body fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • β-Methylamino-L-alanine, or BMAA, is a non-proteinogenic amino acid produced by cyanobacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • BMAA is a derivative of the amino acid alanine with a methylamino group on the side chain. (wikipedia.org)
  • BMAA can be misincorporated into nascent proteins in place of L-serine, possibly causing protein misfolding and aggregation, both hallmarks of tangle diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and Lewy body disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In vitro research has shown that protein association of BMAA can be inhibited in presence of excess L-serine. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study performed in 2015 with vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) in St. Kitts, which are homozygous for the apoE4 gene (a condition which in humans is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease), found that vervets orally administered BMAA developed hallmark histopathology features of Alzheimer's Disease including amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangle accumulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, vervets that were co-administered BMAA with serine were found to have 70% less beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles than those administered BMAA alone, suggesting that serine may be protective against the neurotoxic effects of BMAA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nostoc flagelliforme (fat choy), has no nutritional value, and also contains beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a toxic amino acid that could affect the normal functions of nerve cells and is linked to degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and dementia. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphate
  • The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) cofactor lies in and above the mouth of the alpha/beta barrel and is covalently linked via an aldimine linkage to a lysine residue, which is at the C terminus of the first beta-strand of the alpha/beta barrel. (wikipedia.org)
  • leucine
  • A lot of raws have gone through the roof lately- especially BCAA's (leucine more than anything else), beta alanine, L-arginine, and some of the other aminos. (anabolicminds.com)
  • reaction
  • β-alanine can undergo a transanimation reaction with pyruvate to form malonate-semialdehyde and L-alanine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The traditional mechanism attributed to an alanine racemase reaction is that of a two-base mechanism with a PLP-stabilized carbanion intermediate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Accession
  • Universal protein resource accession number Q7LZG2 for "Phospholipase A2 taicatoxin" at UniProt. (wikipedia.org)
  • Universal protein resource accession number Q7LZE4 for "Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor taicotoxin" at UniProt. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • Your fast twitch muscle fibers -- as well as your general muscle health -- rely on adequate protein intake. (sfgate.com)
  • Protein makes up a significant portion of your muscle tissue, and your muscle cells must continually generate new protein to maintain themselves. (sfgate.com)
  • Beta-alanine is used for improving athletic performance and exercise capacity, building lean muscle mass, and improving physical functioning in the elderly. (webmd.com)
  • vitro
  • High-enrichment binding regions were validated to interact with purified BarR protein in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and almost all targets were also shown to harbour a conserved semi-palindromic binding motif. (diva-portal.org)
  • bulk
  • We had to source a new supply of Beta-Alanine and will have it in stock again soon, however, the cost has gone up dramatically and we may be the only ones carrying bulk for some time apparently. (anabolicminds.com)
  • high
  • Some research shows that taking beta-alanine modestly improves some measures of physical performance, especially during high-intensity exercise and strength training . (webmd.com)