• structural
  • With customized technical strategies, flexible production scale, and proprietary technologies, we offer our clients highly efficient and high-quality recombinant protein production, process development and scale-up production for downstream applications such as functional assays, structural studies, target validation and high throughput screenings etc. (profacgen.com)
  • Proteins also have structural or mechanical functions, such as actin and myosin in muscle and the proteins in the cytoskeleton , which form a system of scaffolding that maintains cell shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, a study of SDH which used diverse methods such as protein sequence alignments , structural comparisons, energy calculations, gel filtration experiments and enzyme kinetics experiments, could reveal an important hydrogen bonding network which stabilizes the tetrameric quaternary structure in mammalian SDH. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phosphorylation alters the structural conformation of a protein, causing it to become activated, deactivated, or modifying its function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many proteins consist of several structural domains. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each definition is valid and will often overlap, i.e. a compact structural domain that is found amongst diverse proteins is likely to fold independently within its structural environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • G proteins , also known as guanine nucleotide-binding proteins , are a family of proteins that act as molecular switches inside cells, and are involved in transmitting signals from a variety of stimuli outside a cell to its interior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Except for S1 (with a molecular weight of 61.2 kDa), the other proteins range in weight between 4.4 and 29.7 kDa. (wikipedia.org)
  • Domain motions can be inferred by comparing different structures of a protein (as in Database of Molecular Motions), or they can be directly observed using spectra measured by neutron spin echo spectroscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular evolution uses domains as building blocks and these may be recombined in different arrangements to create proteins with different functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nuclear
  • Methods commonly used to study protein structure and function include immunohistochemistry , site-directed mutagenesis , X-ray crystallography , nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry . (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is sometimes used to refer only to protein translation but more often it refers to a multi-step process, beginning with amino acid synthesis and transcription of nuclear DNA into messenger RNA , which is then used as input to translation. (princeton.edu)
  • L1 capsid proteins can bind via its nuclear localisation signal (NLS) to karyopherins Kapbeta(2) and Kapbeta(3) and inhibit the Kapbeta(2) and Kapbeta(3) nuclear import pathways during the productive phase of the viral life cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • L2 proteins contain two nuclear localisation signals (NLSs), one at the N-terminal (nNLS) and the other at the C-terminal (cNLS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Note that the term "nucleoporin" refers to unrelated proteins that facilitate transport through nuclear pores in the nuclear envelope. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • Instead, the receptor stimulates a G protein, which then stimulates an enzyme. (wikipedia.org)
  • If this protein is an enzyme, then sometimes it will be able to catalyze a reaction, but most of the time it will not. (indiana.edu)
  • For each one, we'll consider 3 different alleles: non-mutant, a mutation such as that mentioned above with only 10% of normal activity, and a mutation that interferes with protein folding so much that the enzyme has no activity at all. (indiana.edu)
  • any enzyme that removes acetyl groups from lysine amino acids in proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthesis
  • Profacgen's one-stop custom service includes target gene synthesis, codon optimization, expression plasmid construction, cell culture and protein expression, purification and strict quality control. (profacgen.com)
  • Protein synthesis is the process in which cells build proteins . (princeton.edu)
  • After synthesis and purification by high-throughput methodologies, the proteins are printed onto the chip by using an instrument (micro-arrayer) that is capable of spotting liquid samples in a reproducible manner onto a planar support. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • The Rb-E2F/DP complex also attracts a histone deacetylase (HDAC) protein to the chromatin, reducing transcription of S phase promoting factors, further suppressing DNA synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • soluble
  • We will evaluate the possibility of soluble expression, secretory expression, correct modification and folding, production efficiency, necessity of purification steps and protein buffer formulation etc. (profacgen.com)
  • All they can do is group together, forming a droplet of oil in the middle of the protein--with a surrounding shell of soluble amino acids. (indiana.edu)
  • These proteins are water-soluble but can aggregate and associate irreversibly with the lipid bilayer and become reversibly or irreversibly membrane-associated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Entrez Gene
  • The free text search will scan for complete and partial matches to gene names, gene synonyms, gene descriptions, external ( UniProt , Ensembl , NCBI Entrez Gene) gene and protein identifiers, protein classes , Gene Ontology identifiers and descriptions, antibody identifiers and image annotations. (proteinatlas.org)
  • reversible
  • The 1992 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Edwin G. Krebs and Edmond H. Fischer for describing how reversible phosphorylation works as a switch to activate proteins , and to regulate various cellular processes including glycogenolysis . (wikipedia.org)
  • bind
  • The cerberus-related cytokines, together with Dan and DRM / Gremlin, represent a group of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists that can bind directly to BMPs and inhibit their activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Should an oncogenic protein, such as those produced by cells infected by high-risk types of human papillomaviruses, bind and inactivate pRb, this can lead to cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • signals
  • G protein-coupled receptor and G proteins working together transmit signals from many hormones , neurotransmitters , and other signaling factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Membrane proteins perform a variety of functions vital to the survival of organisms: Membrane receptor proteins relay signals between the cell's internal and external environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the ease with which proteins can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated, this type of modification is a flexible mechanism for cells to respond to external signals and environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibit
  • In human embryonic development, Cerberus and the protein coded by GREM3 inhibit NODAL in the Wnt signaling pathway during the formation of the germ layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) has the ability to reversibly inhibit DNA replication through transcriptional repression of DNA replication factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • These proteins are isolated to inhibit the virus from replicating in a host's cells and stop it from spreading to other cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulatory
  • Domain motions are important for: catalysis regulatory activity transport of metabolites formation of protein assemblies cellular locomotion One of the largest observed domain motions is the 'swivelling' mechanism in pyruvate phosphate dikinase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nef (Negative Regulatory Factor) is a small 27-35 kDa myristoylated protein encoded by primate lentiviruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • Nef localizes primarily to the cytoplasm but also partially to the Plasma Membrane (PM) and is one of many pathogen-expressed proteins, known as virulence factors, which function to manipulate the host's cellular machinery and thus allow infection, survival or replication of the pathogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • carboxy terminus
  • The end with a free amino group is known as the N-terminus or amino terminus, whereas the end of the protein with a free carboxyl group is known as the C-terminus or carboxy terminus (the sequence of the protein is written from N-terminus to C-terminus, from left to right). (wikipedia.org)
  • undergone
  • The Pokeweed antiviral protein and the Zinc-Finger antiviral protein are two major antiviral proteins that have undergone several tests for viruses, including HIV and influenza. (wikipedia.org)
  • The soy cotyledon storage proteins, important for human nutrition, can be extracted most efficiently by water, water plus dilute alkali (pH 7-9), or aqueous solutions of sodium chloride (0.5-2 M ≈ 30-120 g/l) from dehulled and defatted soybeans that have undergone only a minimal heat treatment so the protein is close to being native or undenatured. (wikipedia.org)
  • phosphatase
  • In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the first protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) was purified and the discovery, as well as, cloning of JAK kinases was accomplished which led to many in the scientific community to name the 1990s as the decade of protein kinase cascades. (wikipedia.org)
  • organisms
  • Like other biological macromolecules such as polysaccharides and nucleic acids , proteins are essential parts of organisms and participate in virtually every process within cells . (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • These additional head-like structures may contain varying characteristics of a normal head (eye or eyes, brain, notochord) depending on the ratio of overabundant Cerberus to other proteins associated with anterior development that Cerberus inhibits (Wnt, Nodal, and BMP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Portions of protein structures often deviate from the equilibrium state. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Once linked in the protein chain, an individual amino acid is called a residue, and the linked series of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms are known as the main chain or protein backbone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cerberus also known as CER1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CER1 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not much is known about this protein, but it is found in many creatures and has been around for possibly millions of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • A generalized method often referred to as amino acid analysis for determining amino acid frequency is as follows: Hydrolyse a known quantity of protein into its constituent amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • belong
  • Legume proteins, such as soy and pulses, belong to the globulin family of seed storage proteins called legumin and vicilins, or in the case of soybeans, glycinin and beta-conglycinin. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell's
  • Once formed, proteins only exist for a certain period of time and are then degraded and recycled by the cell's machinery through the process of protein turnover . (wikipedia.org)
  • tumor
  • gene name abbreviated RB or RB1) is a tumor suppressor protein that is dysfunctional in several major cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stable
  • Stable cell line construction for large amount of protein expression is also available for both research use and industrial production. (profacgen.com)
  • Because they are independently stable, domains can be "swapped" by genetic engineering between one protein and another to make chimeric proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wetlaufer defined domains as stable units of protein structure that could fold autonomously. (wikipedia.org)
  • biochemical
  • The protein array technology allows the screening of biochemical activities or binding abilities of hundreds or thousands of protein samples in parallel. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • ultimately
  • it is the combined effect of all of the amino acid side chains in a protein that ultimately determines its three-dimensional structure and its chemical reactivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • Other proteins are important in cell signaling , immune responses , cell adhesion , and the cell cycle . (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein binding to helical junctions is important for initiating the correct tertiary fold of RNA and to organize the overall structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Four-time Olympic gold medalist, Hayley Wickenheiser, explains why protein is an important building block for young, active girls. (youtube.com)
  • Whether you're a recreational 'weekend warrior', training hard for a marathon, or particulate regularly in a sport, it's important to make sure you're getting enough protein and calories to meet yo. (youtube.com)
  • Cerberus (Cer) is a gene that encodes a cytokine (a secreted signaling protein) important for induction and formation of the heart and head in vertebrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most important factor governing the folding of a protein into 3D structure is the distribution of polar and non-polar side chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • Like a mentor helping medical students choose between specialties, a protein complex helps shape the destiny of developing T cells, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have reported. (stjude.org)
  • G proteins were discovered when Alfred G. Gilman and Martin Rodbell investigated stimulation of cells by adrenaline . (wikipedia.org)
  • Antiviral proteins are proteins that are induced by human or animal cells to interfere with viral replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a few experiments, this certain antiviral protein defended cells from viruses such as influenza (including influenza A virus subtype H1N1), West Nile virus, dengue virus, and HIV-1. (wikipedia.org)