• substrate
  • Tenase is a contraction of "ten" and the suffix "-ase", which means, that the complex activates its substrate (inactive factor X) by cleaving it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intrinsic tenase complex contains the active factor IX (IXa), its cofactor factor VIII (VIIIa), the substrate (factor X), and they are activated by negatively charged surfaces (such as glass, active platelet membrane, sometimes cell membrane of monocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • A collection of the transglutaminase substrate proteins and interaction partners is accessible in the TRANSDAB database. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammalian
  • 11. A biologically active tissue factor protein capable of being encoded by a polynucleotide as defined in claim 1 or a biologically active variant or fragment of said tissue factor protein which either lacks glycosylation, or has non-mammalian glycosylation. (epo.org)
  • PCAF (p300/CBP-associated factor) and GCN5 are mammalian GNATs that share a high degree of homology throughout their sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The term, "extracellular signal-regulated kinases", is sometimes used as a synonym for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but has more recently been adopted for a specific subset of the mammalian MAPK family. (wikipedia.org)
  • bind
  • The binding domains are located in the carboxy-terminus of the protein and are positively charged (allowing it to bind to the negatively charged microtubule). (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been suggested that ribosomes bind proteins (or protein domain) of similar shape and size to tRNA, and this, rather than function, explains the observed structural mimicry. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 3'-UTR also has silencer regions which bind to repressor proteins and will inhibit the expression of the mRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins bind AREs to affect the stability or decay rate of transcripts in a localized manner or affect translation initiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • kinase
  • In molecular biology, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) or classical MAP kinases are widely expressed protein kinase intracellular signalling molecules that are involved in functions including the regulation of meiosis, mitosis, and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In the MAPK/ERK pathway, Ras activates c-Raf, followed by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (abbreviated as MKK, MEK, or MAP2K) and then MAPK1/2 (below). (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) is also known as "extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2" (ERK2). (wikipedia.org)
  • residues
  • These residues are part of a region that starts at the N-terminal extremity of the mature form of Gla proteins, and that ends with a conserved aromatic residue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In all cases in which their function was known, the presence of the Gla residues in these proteins turned out to be essential for functional activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • H2A are α-helical molecule, amphipathic protein with hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on opposing sides that enhances the antimicrobial activity of H2A. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • In humans, IGFBPs are transcribed from the following seven genes: IGFBP1 IGFBP2 IGFBP3 IGFBP4 IGFBP5 IGFBP6 IGFBP7 Insulin-like growth factor receptor Kalus W, Zweckstetter M, Renner C, et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sas3 found in yeast is a homolog of MOZ (monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein), which is an oncogene found in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, these proteins are found mostly in neurons compared to non-neuronal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is possible that this domain works as part of a complex with other regulator proteins (TRBP in humans, R2D2, Loqs in Drosophila) in order to effectively position the RNaseIII domains and thus control the specificity of the sRNA products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Classification
  • MGI protein superfamily detail pages represent the protein classification set for a homeomorphic superfamily from the Protein Information Resource SuperFamily ( PIRSF ) site. (jax.org)
  • Despite this historical classification of HATs, some HAT proteins function in multiple complexes or locations and would thus not easily fit into a particular class. (wikipedia.org)
  • mRNA
  • Their work described the requirement for two protein factors to release ribosomes from mRNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several regions of the mRNA molecule are not translated into protein including the 5' cap, 5' untranslated region, 3' untranslated region, and the poly(A) tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • complexes
  • Interactions are determined by geometric criteria as described in K. Stierand, M. Rarey (2010), Drawing the PDB: Protein-ligand complexes in two dimensions, ACS Med. (rcsb.org)
  • Recombinant
  • If you cannot find the target and/or product is not available in our catalog, please click here to contact us and request the product or submit your request for custom elisa kit production , custom recombinant protein production or custom antibody production . (mybiosource.com)
  • Custom ELISA Kits, Recombinant Proteins and Antibodies can be designed, manufactured and produced according to the researcher's specifications. (mybiosource.com)
  • neurons
  • For instance,there are indications that both D1 and D2 receptors can trans-activate the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor in neurons (Swift et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • stable
  • Required for stable expression of GPI-anchored proteins at the cell surface (By similarity). (nih.gov)
  • PGAP2 is essential for correct processing and stable expression of GPI-anchored proteins. (nih.gov)
  • tissue
  • I. European patent No 0 278 776 with the title 'Methods and deoxyribonucleic acid for the preparation of tissue factor protein' was granted with 26 claims based on European patent application No.88 301 190.0, claiming priority from US 13743 of 12 February 1987, from US 35409 of 7 April 1987 and from US 152698 of 5 February 1988. (epo.org)
  • Claims 4 to 8 were directed to methods for producing the tissue factor protein (TFP) encoded by the polynucleotide of claims 1 or 2. (epo.org)
  • Extrinsic tenase complex is made up of tissue factor, factor VII, and Ca2+ as an activating ion. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is hypothesized that tissue transglutaminase may be involved in the formation of the protein aggregates that causes Huntington's disease, although it is most likely not required. (wikipedia.org)
  • histones
  • Research has emerged, since, to show that lysine acetylation and other posttranslational modifications of histones generate binding sites for specific protein-protein interaction domains, such as the acetyllysine-binding bromodomain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histones are proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antimicrobial peptide: Histones are conserved eukaryotic cationic proteins present in the cells and are involved in the antimicrobial activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryonic
  • In studies at UC San Francisco of the frog embryo as a model system of cell development, Kirschner identified the first inducer of embryonic differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), an early finding in the field of signal transduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • zinc
  • Belongs to the Sp1 C2H2-type zinc-finger protein family. (abcam.com)
  • Several MYST family proteins contain zinc fingers as well as the highly conserved motif A found among GNATs that facilitates acetyl-CoA binding. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cysteine-rich region located in the N terminus of the HAT domain of MYST proteins is involved in zinc binding, which is essential for HAT activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • cofactor
  • Understanding the process in which an electron is transferred in the protein adduct shows a more precise kinetic model of the FeMo cofactor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolation of the FeMo cofactor from nitrogenase is done through centrifugal sedimentation of nitrogenase into the MoFe protein and the Fe protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • The FeMo cofactor is extracted by treating the MoFe protein with acids5. (wikipedia.org)
  • microtubules
  • Tau proteins (or τ proteins, after the Greek letter with that name) are proteins that stabilize microtubules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pathologies and dementias of the nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are associated with tau proteins that have become defective and no longer stabilize microtubules properly. (wikipedia.org)
  • This contrasts with MAP6 (STOP) proteins in the proximal portions of axons, which, in essence, lock down the microtubules and MAP2 that stabilizes microtubules in dendrites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular
  • Activated by factor XIIa (or XII), which cleaves each polypeptide after Arg-387 into the light chain, which contains the active site, and the heavy chain, which associates with high molecular weight (HMW) kininogen. (abcam.com)
  • receptor
  • They were found during a search for protein kinases that are rapidly phosphorylated after activation of cell surface tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fibrin
  • Factor XIII is activated by thrombin and calcium ion to a transglutaminase that catalyzes the formation of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine cross-links between fibrin chains, thus stabilizing the fibrin clot. (abcam.com)
  • Cross-link in fibrin polymerized by factor 13: epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine. (wikipedia.org)