• mucous
  • Mucous discharges can be thought of in three broad categories: Normal physiologically produced mucus Inappropriately expressed physiologically produced mucus (e.g. in the presence of sphincter defects, or lesions preventing normal sphincter closure, allowing seepage or soiling) Mucus produced in pathological quantities (e.g. from a lesion, or generalized coloproctitis or as a result of bacterial overgrowth) A mucous rectal discharge may be blood-streaked. (wikipedia.org)
  • anus
  • Rectal prolapse is a very disabling disease, and although its etiopathogenesis has not yet been well established, it is frequently associated with other abnormalities, including patulous anus, levator ani muscle diastasis, mesorectum elongation, deep pouch of Douglas, redundant rectosigmoid and increased width of the retrorectal space. (springer.com)
  • Rectoanal intussusception (RAI) is a partial or total rectal invagination without protrusion from the anus. (springer.com)
  • The surgery to repair an imperforate anus can make rectal prolapse more likely. (peacehealth.org)
  • Surgery also can be done through the perineum (the area between the genitals and the anus) to remove the prolapsing tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • Survival after high or low ligation of the interior mesenteric artery during curative surgery for rectal cancer. (springer.com)
  • Hojo K, Vernava AM, Sugihara K, Katumata K. Preservation of urine voiding and sexual function after rectal cancer surgery. (springer.com)
  • Previous surgery can also weaken the muscles and cause rectal prolapse. (hemorrhoidshemroids.com)
  • If the rectal prolapse is due to pregnancy, stresses of childbirth, or occurs in children, the rectal prolapse is often self correcting, so a period of medication and observation will generally be tried before suggesting surgery. (hemorrhoidshemroids.com)
  • Traditional gynecologic practice favors removal of the uterus or ovaries (or both) at the time of prolapse surgery, and one estimate states that of the 600,000 hysterectomies performed in the United States every year, 13 percent are for prolapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Causes of small bowel obstruction include: Adhesions from previous abdominal surgery (most common cause) Barbed sutures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe cases of hemorrhoidal prolapse will normally require surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • PPH is generally indicated for the more severe cases of internal hemorrhoidal prolapse (3rd and 4th degree) where surgery would normally be indicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Notaras published in various surgical journals, and wrote chapters for a number of surgical textbooks, including: Maingot's Textbook of Abdominal Surgery Rob and Smith's Textbook of Operative Surgery Nyhus's Textbook of Operative Surgery Nyhus's Textbook of Abdominal Surgery (Spanish) Surgical Clinics of North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excision
  • Because of this, surgeons will generally reserve formal excision for the most severe cases of prolapse, or for patients who have failed to respond to conventional treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • Surgeries here include repair of rectal prolapse and anterior meningocele, radical perineal prostatectomy, removal of tumors including sacrococcygeal teratoma, and coccygectomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Later signs include rectal bleeding, often with "red currant jelly" stool (stool mixed with blood and mucus), and lethargy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiological signs of bowel obstruction include bowel distension and the presence of multiple (more than six) gas-fluid levels on supine and erect abdominal radiographs. (wikipedia.org)
  • discharge
  • The differential diagnosis of rectal discharge is extensive, but the general etiological themes are infection and inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • uterus
  • Prolapsed uterus in cattle, particularly dairy cattle, generally occurs in the first 12 hours post-calving. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] with newborn lamb with afterbirth stained uterus (12 hours out) before re-positioning Rectal prolapse is a condition routinely identified in pigs on farms and at slaughterhouses. (wikipedia.org)