• 1960s
  • Between 1947 and the late 1960s, Puerto Rico saw major industrialization that transformed the island from a rural agrarian to an urban industrial society. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the 1960s, the population had grown to nearly three million people, with only five clinical psychologists on the island to support the growing need for social services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The company continued through the 1950s and 1960s, continuing to sell health and accident policies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The history of the breakdown of the Empire has attracted scholars of the histories of the United States (which broke away in 1776), India (independent in 1947), and the African colonies (independent in the 1960s). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1948
  • The NHS in Scotland was established as a separate entity with its own legislation, the National Health Service (Scotland) Act 1947, from the foundation of the NHS in 1948. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sir Frank Aubrey Newsam, GCB, KBE, CVO, MC (13 November 1893 - 25 April 1964) was a British civil servant notable for his service as Permanent Under-Secretary of State to the Home Office from 1948 to 1957, although he had been a central figure for many years previously. (wikipedia.org)
  • India
  • She was interested in the nursing service for the civilian population, though her first interest was the welfare of the army in India. (wikipedia.org)
  • The development of Nursing in India was greatly influenced by the Christian missionaries, WorldWar, British rule and by the International agencies such as the World Health Organization UNICEF, the Red Cross, UNSAID etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • United States Const
  • United States Federal Law also provides for the compulsory conscription of men between the ages of 17 and 45 and certain women for militia service pursuant to Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution and 10 U.S. Code § 246. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1950
  • The only way to ensure the financial survival of the mines in the valleys was massive investment from the National Coal Board, but the "Plan for Coal" drawn up in 1950 was overly optimistic about the future demand for coal, which was drastically reduced following an industrial recession in 1956 and an increased availability of oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • For details of the history of each National Health Service, particularly since 1999, see: History of the National Health Service (England) History of NHS Scotland History of NHS Wales History of Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland The NHS was the first universal health care system established anywhere in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Responding to industry demands, Aon announced its new fee disclosure policy in 1999, and the company reorganised to focus on buying personal line insurance firms and to integrate its acquisitions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minister for He
  • The Department is led by the Minister for Health who is assisted by three Ministers of State. (wikipedia.org)
  • The departmental team consists of the following: Minister for Health: Simon Harris, TD Minister of State for Disability Issues: Finian McGrath, TD Minister of State for Health Promotion and the National Drugs Strategy: Catherine Byrne, TD Minister of State for Mental Health and Older People: Jim Daly, TD Secretary General of the Department: Jim Breslin The department was created by the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act, 1946. (wikipedia.org)
  • centers
  • and Establishing "health centers" in remote locations so that all Pakistanis can reach health facilities easily. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rosch notes that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have been running an ACO demonstration project, called the Physician Group Practice Demonstration, for several years now. (blogspot.com)
  • Galexis AG, part of the Galenica group, is a leading pharmaceutical wholesaler in Switzerland with two distribution centers providing pharmacies, medical practices, drugstores, nursing homes and hospitals with its extensive range of products and services. (wn.com)
  • clinical
  • Providing effective stewardship over health resources by demanding accountability for achieving outcomes including financial, managerial and clinical accountability, and by providing the frameworks, including enhanced service planning at national level to improve the overall governance of the health system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social workers are given excellent training in this function- perhaps better training than either of the other two major mental health professionals, clinical psychologists or psychiatrists. (encyclopedia.com)
  • born 1947 in Tel Aviv, British mandate of palestine (now in Israel) is an Israeli-Canadian pediatrician, clinical pharmacologist, toxicologist, and a composer of Israeli popular music. (wikipedia.org)
  • After a period of military service, he pursued postgraduate clinical studies in pediatrics and pediatric nephrology, and research training in pediatric toxicology and pharmacology and membrane biology at the Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto. (wikipedia.org)
  • He joined the staff of the university and hospital and rose rapidly through the ranks to full professorship in pediatrics, pharmacology and medicine, won a Career Scientist Award from the Ontario Ministry of Health and established an international reputation as an expert in the field of clinical pharmacology and toxicology. (wikipedia.org)
  • But in 1996, the FTC's policies on health care mergers were amended to provide a safe harbor to competing hospitals that achieved sufficient clinical integration. (blogspot.com)
  • decades
  • Now, look at the remarks from former Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis, who, you might remember, introduced the first universal health care law to the state several decades ago. (blogspot.com)
  • relation
  • this ended in 1941 when Kallman refused to accept the faithful relation that Auden demanded, but the two maintained their friendship, and from 1947 until Auden's death they lived in the same house or apartment in a non-sexual relationship, often collaborating on opera libretti such as The Rake's Progress, for music by Igor Stravinsky. (wikipedia.org)
  • civilian
  • Most of these enterprises, such as stud and dairy farms, were for the army's own use, but others, such as bakeries, security services and banking, perform functions in the local civilian economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • legislation
  • Policies and procedures once developed simply on the basis of a hospital's mission statement began to he shaped by government legislation, joint commission standards, and demands of third party payers (e.g., insurance companies). (gameo.org)
  • professions
  • With the main campus in San Juan, Puerto Rico, a branch campus in Miami, Florida, and an additional instructional location in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, the university provides professional training that is relevant and responsive to the mental health needs of multicultural communities and supports culturally sensitive research that contributes to and helps grow the professions of psychology, health, education, and human services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The William S. White Building was completed on the north side of the Flint River in 2002 for School of Health Professions and Studies and the School of Management. (wikipedia.org)
  • community
  • The corps also has a secondary role of providing civil services in health, rehabilitation and disaster relief to the wider Pakistan community. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the early 1960's, little had changed, with mental health professionals being trained abroad and then returning to their home country with the challenge of adapting what they had learned in the United States to fit the sociocultural realities of a Hispanic community. (wikipedia.org)
  • Now, over 50 years since its founding, the San Juan campus has over 1,000 students and has expanded to include two on-campus training clinics: the Clínica de Salud Mental de la Comunidad (Community Mental Health Clinic) and the Clínica de Patología del Habla y Lenguaje (Speech and Language Pathology Clinic). (wikipedia.org)
  • The mission of the Department of Public Health (DPH) is to promote and ensure the availability, accessibility, and quality of preventive and personal health services necessary to protect and improve the health and well-being of the Philadelphia community. (phila.gov)
  • The formation of the SPVA led to the provision of a fully integrated set of 'through life' personnel services to the serving and veterans community - where a single contact with the Agency granted access to customer information and advice on pay, pensions, compensation payments, records of service and medal entitlement. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • While the School of Education and Human Services was formed in 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1997, it bought The Minet Group, as well as insurance brokerage Alexander & Alexander Services, Inc. in a deal that made Aon (temporarily) the largest insurance broker worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • Protecting the interests of patients and consumers and supporting practitioners and professionals to practice to the highest standards by providing a prudent and appropriate regulatory framework. (wikipedia.org)
  • reform
  • Being a shrewd political operator, Bevan managed to push through the radical health care reform measure by dividing and cajoling the opposition, as well as by offering lucrative payment structures for consultants. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 1 April 2014, the SPVA merged with Defence Business Services as part of the Defence Reform. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health-care reform does very little about medical malpractice. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Ministry
  • The Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA) was an executive agency of the UK Ministry of Defence. (wikipedia.org)
  • The years since the 1960 witnessed a radical shift in what had been a reasonably clear ministry of health care by the Mennonite churches through hospitals, clinics, and dispensaries. (gameo.org)
  • medical
  • Soldiers in Nursing and other trades of Army Medical Corps cadre undergo their basic military training and nusing classes at AMC centre Abottabad and subsequent professional courses at AFPGMI. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since then the Pakistan Army Medical Corps has provided services in the majority of health related fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the past personnel were taken from Army Medical College in Rawalpindi, but with the need of more health professionals in the army as well as an increased demand for their services, the corps has begun to recruit civilians medical personnel, who then attend short military courses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Pakistan Army Medical Corps is one of the largest contributors of health services to United Nations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital was shifted to its present location in 1943 to cope with the growing demand for medical and health care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • On June 30, 2015 the Health Department of Pakistan changed the status of the Medical College to the Medical University and the current principal was made the Vice Chancellor of the University. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the medical professional Prof. Shujaat Ali with the help of his colleagues nurtured the idea of setting up a medical institution in the same premises for teaching female doctors. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1908 his family moved to Homer Road, Solihull, near Birmingham, where his father had been appointed the School Medical Officer and Lecturer (later Professor) of Public Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical means of healing have been practiced since prehistoric times, but Physiatry did not become recognized as a separate medical specialty until 1947. (physiatry.org)
  • Formal education for Physiatry had its beginning in 1926 when, after service in the U.S. Army during World War I, Dr. John Stanley Coulter joined the faculty of Northwestern University Medical School as the first full-time academic physician in physical medicine. (physiatry.org)
  • At the outbreak of the Second World War, the Hospital became an independent unit in the Emergency Medical Service for the treatment of air-raid casualties. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • PHARMAEXCHANGE is an on-line auction system for pharmaceutical wholesalers created to make their business life easier and more efficient.The users are invited to insert their offers and demands for Rx and OTC pharmaceuticals and for medical devices, and to bid in any of the opened auctions. (wn.com)
  • substance
  • These and other radical influences changed markedly the shape and substance of health-related facilities in the United States and Canada. (gameo.org)
  • business
  • Degrees were offered in bachelor degrees in liberal arts and sciences and in the professional fields of education and business administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The SPVA operated from four main sites: Glasgow (Kentigern House), Gloucester (Imjin Barracks), Gosport (Centurion Building) and Norcross (Blackpool) The SPVA's executive agency status was removed on 16 June 2011 in preparation for it to be merged into the Defence Business Services (DBS) organisation. (wikipedia.org)
  • His research had led him to determine that Richmond, Virginia was a city that did not have an established extermination business, and so in 1909, Orkin arrived there and started to establish not only his poison sales business in the area, but an extermination service business, as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite its troubles, in 2000 Aon bought Reliance Group's accident and health insurance business, as well as Actuarial Sciences Associates, a compensation and employee benefits consulting company. (wikipedia.org)
  • city
  • Surrounded by thickly populated area the hospital caters to the western and southern part of the city and provides services to adjacent districts of Lahore. (wikipedia.org)
  • Located in the heart of Puerto Rico's capital city, the San Juan campus set a precedent as the first independent professional school of psychology in North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Board attampted to deal with the city's public issues on an ad hoc basis for another ten years until 1804 when it was decided that the multiplicity and magnitude of public health issues of the increasingly expanding city demanded a full time effort from professionals trained in their duties. (phila.gov)
  • The Department's existence was continued by the City Charter of 1951, and the Board of Health continued under it. (phila.gov)
  • The demand for higher education increased with the return of soldiers after World War II, and was a major factor in the establishment of a branch of the University of Michigan in the city of Flint. (wikipedia.org)
  • By April of that year, Orkin serviced over 24 major clients in the city of Atlanta, which he listed proudly in advertisements he took out in the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce's publication, City Builder. (wikipedia.org)
  • British
  • Newsam was born in Barbados, where his father William Elias Newsam held a post in the British Colonial Service. (wikipedia.org)
  • Born in 1947 in Tel Aviv in the British Mandate of Palestine, just prior to the establishment of the State of Israel, Gideon Koren was raised in the neighbouring little town of Kiryat Ono. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • This precluded him from ever becoming a major star" and Peter Meakin "There was gossip about inappropriate language and he was incredibly demanding," Mr Meakin said. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the major changes in the university came during the 1870s when a greater emphasis was placed upon research, the management of the university became more professional, academic subjects were reformed, and the forms of teaching evolved. (wikipedia.org)
  • College
  • His principal interest during this time was the Police service, for which he created the Police Staff College at Bramshill. (wikipedia.org)
  • university
  • Albizu University is a private, non-profit university offering undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of psychology, education, speech and language, criminal justice, ESOL, and human services. (wikipedia.org)
  • During 1947 the Regents of the University of Michigan approved a higher education needs assessment for Flint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Winthrop-University Hospital is deeply committed to the health and well-being of all the communities we serve. (3blmedia.com)
  • Hospitals
  • The Bureau of Charities was merged into the Bureau of Charities and Correction of the Department of Public Welfare but its control of Philadelphia General Hospital and the Philadelphia Hospital for the Insane ("Byberry") was retained by the Department of Public Health under its newly formed Bureau of Hospitals. (phila.gov)
  • The Department also retained control of the Bureau of Health (its Hospital for Contagious Diseases passing to the Bureau of Hospitals) and the Board of Health. (phila.gov)
  • Many Mennonite young people performed alternative service in mental hospitals during that war. (gameo.org)
  • 1998
  • Established in 1998 with the goal of expanding its service to a global scale, the company obtained its Warehouse Distribution License ( WDL ) in 2007 . (wn.com)
  • Secretary
  • In 1969, responsibility for the NHS in Wales was passed to the Secretary of State for Wales from the Secretary of State for Health who was thereafter just responsible for the NHS in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • A round of changes in civil service appointments at the Home Office in June 1933 saw Newsam, now promoted to Assistant Secretary, take charge of a new division. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pakistan
  • Since 1960 Pakistan has been actively involved in most of the UN peacekeeping, rehabilitation and health providing missions and today stands at the top with 10,175 troops and observers serving in current missions. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • The Department's mission is to "support, protect and empower individuals, families and their communities to achieve their full health potential by putting health at the centre of public policy and by leading the development of high quality, equitable and efficient health and personal social services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The role of the Department and Departmental team is to support the Minister and the democratic process by: Formulating policy underpinned by an evidence-based approach and providing direction on national health priorities ensuring that quality and value for money are enhanced through the implementation of an evidence-based approach underpinned by monitoring and evaluation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CLPNA embraces change that serves the best interests of the public, the profession, and a quality health care system. (issuu.com)
  • Our health determines the quality of life we enjoy, our capacity to pursue what we want in life and our ability to care for our families and build and sustain vibrant communities. (issuu.com)
  • Of the few industries that still relied on coal, the demand was for quality coals, especially coking coal, which was required by the steel industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • The net result" of ACOs, says Rosch, "may therefore be higher costs and lower quality health care-precisely the opposite of its goal. (blogspot.com)
  • CO-RE-NA, in other words, is actively contributing to improve the quality of health all over the world. (wn.com)
  • hospital
  • There was a time when professional nurses had very little choice of service because nursing was centred in the hospital and bedside nursing. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1992 he founded the Bear Theatre at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, the only such theatre worldwide where health professionals perform weekly for hospitalized children and their families. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following his accession to the throne in 1936, the Hospital was honoured by the Patronage of His Majesty The King gaining its 'Royal' prefix in 1947. (uclh.nhs.uk)
  • full
  • It is designed to provide compensation, irrespective of fault, across the full range of circumstances in which illness, injury or death may arise as a result of service. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orkin found that it was much more practical and economical to perform a single "clean-out" service and then return regularly to ensure the pests could no longer secure a foothold in a building than it was to perform a full "clean-out" service once or twice a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • In my time as Minister of Alberta Health and Wellness, I have been continually impressed with the level of commitment and passion that nurses bring to their profession and the positive difference they make in the lives of Albertans each and every day. (issuu.com)
  • During this time most of the non-Western health care systems wrestled with issues of how to bring limited resources to meet overwhelming needs and how church and state resources could work together without exercising too much control over each other. (gameo.org)
  • It was also during this time that Orkin sought to elevate the perception of his occupation by launching a public relations campaign that touted extermination services as necessary to good sanitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Speaking during the Harvard School of Public Health Voices from the Field series , Dukakis said urging the health care market to fix itself is "a colossal waste of time. (blogspot.com)
  • army
  • Of the 168,649 men procured for the Union Army through the draft, 117,986 were substitutes, leaving only 50,663 who had their personal services conscripted. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • It is largely a story about people, people whose observations brought them to acknowledge the great impact that certain experiences imbue on the learning, functioning and health of individuals. (idyllarbor.com)
  • The future of our province depends on our health and well-being as individuals, families and communities. (issuu.com)
  • Individuals have access and responsibility for the upkeep of their own information and can make expenses and allowance claims on-line, via the self-service facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • A national health service was one of the fundamental assumptions in the Beveridge Report which Arthur Greenwood, Labour's Deputy Leader and wartime Cabinet Minister with responsibility for post-war reconstruction had successfully pressed the cabinet to commission from economist and social reformer William Beveridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • additional
  • Tax free lump sum awards, up to £570,000, for injury can be paid in Service, with an additional monthly Guaranteed Income monthly payment, available for the most seriously injured, on leaving the Armed Forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • This increased the demand for additional layers of management as well as complicating the communication process necessary for efficiency. (gameo.org)
  • public policy
  • I have noted before that public policy formulation in the health care arena is characterized by a striking lack of rigor . (blogspot.com)
  • DAVID LANDRITH ArMA Vice President of Policy and Political Affairs April 18, 1947 - February 17, 2015 David Landrith, MPA, DHL, spent his life in service to good public policy for Arizona. (issuu.com)