• ester
  • The drug is a phosphate ester and prodrug of miproxifene (DP-TAT-59) with improved water solubility that was better suited for clinical development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Miproxifene is the active metabolite of miproxifene phosphate (TAT-59), a phosphate ester and prodrug of miproxifene that was developed to improve its water solubility. (wikipedia.org)
  • drug
  • Instead of administering a drug directly, a corresponding prodrug might be used instead to improve how a medicine is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted (ADME). (wikipedia.org)
  • A prodrug may be used to improve how selectively the drug interacts with cells or processes that are not its intended target. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prodrugs can be classified into two major types, based on how the body converts the prodrug into the final active drug form: Type I prodrugs are bioactivated inside the cells (intracellularly). (wikipedia.org)
  • The reasons for this type of formulation may be because the drug is more stable during manufacture and storage as the prodrug form, or because the prodrug is better absorbed by the body or has superior pharmacokinetics (e.g., lisdexamphetamine). (wikipedia.org)
  • target
  • Type II prodrugs are bioactivated extracelluarly, either in the milieu of GI fluids (Type IIA), within the systemic circulation and/or other extracellular fluid compartments (Type IIB), or near therapeutic target tissues/cells (Type IIC), relying on common enzymes such as esterases and phosphatases or target directed enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs (HAPs) are prodrugs that target regions of tumor hypoxia within tumor cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • drugs
  • Note 2: Prodrugs can thus be viewed as drugs containing specialized nontoxic protective groups used in a transient manner to alter or to eliminate undesirable properties in the parent molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, terfenadine was discovered to be the prodrug of the active molecule, fexofenadine, which does not carry the same risks as the parent compound. (wikipedia.org)