• dura mater
  • Craniotomy is distinguished from craniectomy (in which the skull flap is not immediately replaced, allowing the brain to swell, thus reducing intracranial pressure) and from trepanation, the creation of a burr hole through the cranium in to the dura mater. (wikipedia.org)
  • A key advantage of strip and grid electrode arrays is that they may be slid underneath the dura mater into cortical regions not exposed by the craniotomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • neurological disorders
  • The implant under development, which literally provides a 'window to the brain', will allow doctors to deliver minimally invasive, laser-based treatments to patients with life-threatening neurological disorders, such as brain cancers, traumatic brain injuries, neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. (medindia.net)
  • tumor
  • Stealth neuro-navigational/image-guided craniotomy is a specialized imaging with computer guidance using the microscope for precise tumor removal. (uwhealth.org)
  • The craniotomy begins with a surgeon removing an area of the skull over the tumor and cutting into the meninges, the membranes that protect the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • If an area is stimulated and the patient moves or loses some ability, like speech, the surgeon knows that the area is vital and cannot be removed or cut through to access a tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuroscience
  • The idea first began circulating in the neuroscience community after some split-brain patients exhibited the alien hand syndrome, which led some scientists to believe that there must be two separate consciousnesses within the brain's left and right hemispheres in competition with one another once the corpus callosum is severed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The procedure is also widely used in neuroscience for extracellular recording, brain imaging, and for neurological manipulations such as electrical stimulation and chemical titration. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • This procedure was used to explore the functional anatomy of the brain, mapping speech areas and identifying the somatosensory and somatomotor cortex areas to be excluded from surgical removal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process is commonly known as "cell-saver" and is considered far superior to the use of blood from a donor, because it reduces the possibility of infection and provides more functional cells back to the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, while the presence of symptoms may provoke further clinical investigation, symptoms independent of further data cannot-and should not-be interpreted as evidence of a cyst's existence, size, location, or potential functional impact on the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Calcification deriving from nervous system tumors is a rare quality in astroblastoma patients, but it is nonetheless easy to identify. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors, juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, and hemangioblastoma are well-established, pediatric brain cancer tumors that are often confused with astroblastoma patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • Rice University researchers are incorporating a unique way to deliver time-released antibiotics to ward off infection while a patient heals. (medindia.net)
  • At least 40% of patients became susceptible to at least one infection, creating more interconnected risk factors along the way. (wikipedia.org)
  • corpus callosum
  • The procedure of surgically removing the corpus callosum is called a corpus callosotomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their results found a pattern amongst patients: severing the entire corpus callosum stops the interhemispheric transfer of perceptual, sensory, motor, and other forms of information. (wikipedia.org)
  • A similar type of procedure, known as a commissurotomy, involves severing a number of interhemispheric tracts (such as the anterior commissure, the hippocampal commissure and the massa intermedia of the thalamus) in addition to the corpus callosum. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this procedure the corpus callosum is cut through in an effort to limit the spread of epileptic activity between the two halves of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • intracranial
  • The authors review their experience with a series of patients who had intracranial aneurysms smaller than 3 mm in diameter. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The most defining physical symptom of astroblastoma, regardless of location, is elevated intracranial pressure, occurring when cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space exhibits heavy pressure and decreased blood flow, resulting in throbbing headache or nausea for the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study found 18% of patients with intracranial arachnoid cysts had non-specific headaches. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model (Cox 1972) for PFS will be performed with the stratification variables as fixed variables to assess the treatment effect adjusting patient-specific risk factors. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of the procedure was to alleviate the effects of epilepsy when other forms of treatment (medications) had failed to stop the violent convulsions associated with the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3 mm in diameter) were diagnosed in 94 patients who were subsequently referred for endovascular treatment. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Craniotomies are often critical operations, performed on patients who are suffering from brain lesions or traumatic brain injury (TBI), and can also allow doctors to surgically implant deep brain stimulators for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, and cerebellar tremor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pain treatment after craniotomy: where is the (procedure-specific) evidence? (wikipedia.org)
  • cranial
  • For a patient who has cranial and peripheral nerve disorder and a documented comorbidity, which DRG is assigned? (cram.com)
  • A patient with a cyst on the left middle cranial fossa had auditory hallucinations, migraine-like headaches, and periodic paranoia Patients with left temporal lobe cysts had mood disturbances similar to manic depression (bipolar disorder) and were known to show outward aggression Patients with arachnoid cysts may never show symptoms, even in some cases where the cyst is large The exact cause of arachnoid cysts is not known. (wikipedia.org)
  • aneurysms
  • All patients presented after subarachnoid hemorrhage, which was attributed to the very small aneurysms in 85 patients. (ox.ac.uk)
  • This procedure was deemed "uncontrollable" due to its high morbidity and mortality rate, but it demonstrated that the endovascular approach was feasible for many aneurysms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type
  • the fixed copayment amount for this type of procedure, adjusted for wages in the geographic area, is $15. (cram.com)
  • In a 2002 study involving 78 patients with a migraine or tension-type headache, CT scans showed abnormalities in over a third of the patients, though arachnoid cysts only accounted for 2.6% of patients in this study. (wikipedia.org)
  • feasible
  • With the advent of more sophisticated endovascular materials (microcatheters and microguidewires, soft and ultrasoft coils, and stents) endovascular procedures have become feasible and can lead to a good angiographic outcome. (ox.ac.uk)
  • chronic subdural
  • Chronic subdural bleeds develop over a period of days to weeks, often after minor head trauma, though such a cause is not identifiable in 50% of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • pain
  • Variations in pain threshold, drug tolerance, and visceral sensitivity among patients make it difficult to anticipate the appropriate dose of sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The anaesthetic management of patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Local anaesthesia (freezing) and sedation are required to make the patient comfortable and free of pain, but also to be able to cooperate for testing of brain function (speaking, moving) in order to preserve these areas while removing the brain tumour. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The usual way to give these medications is by the anesthesiologist assessing pain level, watching the patient and monitoring blood pressure and heart rate. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Proper pain relief is a major concern of patients worldwide. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • however, it was associated with improved patient satisfaction regarding overall pain control. (ovid.com)
  • reduces
  • OBJECTIVES: Patient-controlled sedation (PCS) with propofol, is well tolerated and reduces recovery time and staff required during endoscopic interventions. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The procedure reduces blood circulation to the aneurysm through the use of microsurgical detachable platinum wires, with the clinician inserting one or more into the aneurysm until it is determined that blood flow is no longer occurring within the space. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgeon
  • During the procedure, the surgeon, anesthesiologist, and other surgical personnel speak to the patient, and there is a technician constantly assessing the patient's ability to name objects, for example, or report any abnormal sensations. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, a craniotomy will be preceded by an MRI scan which provides an image of the brain that the surgeon uses to plan the precise location for bone removal and the appropriate angle of access to the relevant brain areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • Later, in 1980, similar techniques were developed by Alksne and Smith using iron suspended in methyl methcrylate in a limited set of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • sedation
  • Propofol was recently introduced for sedation in endoscopy and has a rapid onset and offset of action, making it an ideal substance for patient-controlled administration. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The safety, feasibility, and acceptability of patient-controlled sedation for colonoscopy: prospective study. (biomedsearch.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety, feasibility, and acceptability of patient-controlled sedation for elective day-case colonoscopy, and the factors predicting patients' unwillingness to use patient-controlled sedation for colonoscopy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Patient-controlled versus nurse-administered sedation with propofol during colonoscopy. (biomedsearch.com)