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  • behavioral
  • According to the American Psychiatric Association, physicians stated three criteria to diagnose this disease: (1) physiological problems, such as hand tremors and blackouts, (2) psychological problems, such as excessive desire to drink, and (3) behavioral problems that disrupt social interaction or work performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • As defined by experts with a biomedical background, a mental disorder is "a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and that is associated with present disability or with a significantly increased risk of suffering, death, pain, disability, or an important loss of freedom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with CU traits have distinct problems in emotional and behavioral regulation that distinguish them from other antisocial youth and show more similarity to characteristics found in adult psychopathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common areas of study include psychosocial development, environmental factors which contribute to the development of a disorder, outcomes of children with medical conditions, treating the comorbid behavioral and emotional components of illness and injury, and promoting proper health behaviors, developmental disabilities, educating psychologists and other health professionals on the psychological aspects of pediatric conditions, and advocating for public policy that promotes children's health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interventions are not just illness-related, but address behavioral problems as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • adolescents
  • Despite being the most commonly studied and diagnosed mental disorder in children and adolescents, the exact cause is unknown in the majority of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • In an open-label study of 100 adolescents with type I bipolar disorder,4 63% met response criteria after 4 weeks of lithium and 26% showed manic symptom remission. (pendulum.org)
  • Pediatric psychology is a multidisciplinary field of both scientific research and clinical practice which attempts to address the psychological aspects of illness, injury, and the promotion of health behaviors in children, adolescents, and families in a pediatric health setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • At least 10% of children and adolescents have functional impairment due to a diagnosed mental health and/or substance abuse disorder (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999), and up to 25% have clinically significant problems that may not (yet) rise to the level of a diagnosable psychiatric disorder (Briggs-Gowan et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • traits
  • The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors may play a role in the expression of these traits as a conduct disorder (CD). (wikipedia.org)
  • The addition "with limited prosocial emotions" to the conduct disorder diagnosis in DSM-5 is to classify a specific subgroup of antisocial youth with distinguishing antisocial behaviors and psychopathic traits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in combination with CU traits seem to cause antisocial behavior even without external hardships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with conduct problems who also exhibit high levels of CU traits reflect a particularly high heritability rate of 0.81, as reflected in longitudinal research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with CU traits have more severe conduct disorder, and respond to different management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with high CU traits are less responsive to time-out and other punishment techniques than are healthy children as they are unperturbed by the threat of punishment and time-out does not seem to bother them, so their behavior does not improve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reward-based disciplining techniques, such as praise and reinforcement, tend to have a greater effect than punishing techniques on children with high CU traits in reducing antisocial behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Childhood-onset CU shows a more aggressive and stable pattern of antisocial behavior with higher rates of CU traits, as well as more severe temperamental and neuropsychological risk factors relative to their adolescent-onset counterparts. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a 20-item inventory of perceived personality traits and recorded behaviors, intended to be completed on the basis of a semi-structured interview along with a review of 'collateral information' such as official records. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset
  • Tourette syndrome is an inherited neurological disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by the presence of motor and phonic tics . (wikipedia.org)
  • The onset of directed attention fatigue can be triggered by a number of activities, all of which involve use of the brain's inhibitory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tourette syndrome (TS or simply Tourette's) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • Such patterns of comorbidity among psychiatric disorders highlight possible common etiological processes, genetic influences, or maintaining factors among subsets of disorders, and may also have implications for treatment selection and responsiveness to specific therapies ( Krueger, 1999 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon constructed computer programs that simulated the thought processes people go through when solving different kinds of problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • personality
  • This temporary condition is not a clinical illness or a personality disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • PCL-R Factors 1a and 1b are correlated with narcissistic personality disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factor 1 has been correlated with narcissistic personality disorder, low anxiety, low empathy, low stress reaction and low suicide risk but high scores on scales of achievement and social potency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abnormal
  • In contrast to the abnormal movements of other movement disorders (for example, choreas, dystonias, myoclonus, and dyskinesias), the tics of Tourette's are temporarily suppressible, nonrhythmic, and often preceded by an unwanted premonitory urge. (wikipedia.org)
  • schizophrenia
  • Family studies indicate that the closer a person's genetic relatedness to a person with schizophrenia, the greater the likelihood of developing the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnostic
  • Non-random patterns of diagnostic comorbidity among some combinations of psychiatric disorders are common and likely meaningful. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In several recent reports, confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) methods have been used to evaluate competing hierarchical models of psychiatric disorders based on concurrent, 12-month, or lifetime diagnostic comorbidity. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • A frequent assumption underlying this research is that the resultant measurement models reveal a "liability spectrum," whereby certain psychiatric disorders are regarded as expressions of latent liabilities that, in turn, explain diagnostic comorbidity or the increased risk for spectrum-related disorders during one's lifetime ( Krueger & Markon, 2006 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • citation needed
  • Aspects of the wider community have also been implicated,[citation needed] including employment problems, socioeconomic inequality, lack of social cohesion, problems linked to migration, and features of particular societies and cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • tasks
  • To clarify this issue, future neuropsychological investigations are encouraged to employ tasks with significantly more trials and direct manipulations of bottom-up mechanisms with larger samples. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although one's efforts may involve very different tasks, each incoming stimulus calls upon the same directed attention mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • page needed] Directed attention, or voluntary attention, requires a great deal of concentration and focus, and is employed in tasks such as problem solving. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies that require participants to carry out attention-demanding tasks under conditions of high distraction reveal how unpleasant a mentally fatigued person can be. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fatigue that is experienced by participants of these kinds of studies is induced by attention-intensive tasks, and the observed effects of such fatigue are correlated with decline in inhibitory control. (wikipedia.org)
  • one's
  • What is important is to find a way to combat this problem before it happens, rather than waiting for it to potentially affect one's children. (pendulum.org)
  • alcohol
  • For example, if the "Chief Enabler" (the main enabler in the family) will often turn a blind eye to the addict's drug/alcohol use as this allows for the enabler to continue to play the victim and/or martyr role, while allowing the addict to continue his/her own destructive behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • tics
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • impulsivity
  • 1992 ). A third domain, which has received less attention, refers to impulsivity at the pre-decisional stage, when the individual gathers and evaluates information. (springer.com)
  • High PCL-R scores are positively associated with measures of impulsivity and aggression, Machiavellianism, persistent criminal behavior, and negatively associated with measures of empathy and affiliation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurobiological findings suggest that there are specific brain regions involved in impulsive behavior, although different brain networks may contribute to different manifestations of impulsivity, and that genetics may play a role. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavioral
  • However, the effectiveness of this medication for improving attention and behavioral functioning in children with medical illnesses or brain injury are less clear. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • As defined by experts with a biomedical background, a mental disorder is "a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and that is associated with present disability or with a significantly increased risk of suffering, death, pain, disability, or an important loss of freedom. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the American Psychiatric Association, physicians stated three criteria to diagnose this disease: (1) physiological problems, such as hand tremors and blackouts, (2) psychological problems, such as excessive desire to drink, and (3) behavioral problems that disrupt social interaction or work performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with CU traits have distinct problems in emotional and behavioral regulation that distinguish them from other antisocial youth and show more similarity to characteristics found in adult psychopathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • comorbid
  • There is some evidence to support the clinical lore that children with "TS-only" (Tourette syndrome in the absence of other comorbid conditions) are unusually gifted: neuropsychological studies have identified advantages in children with TS-only. (wikipedia.org)
  • adolescents
  • Despite being the most commonly studied and diagnosed mental disorder in children and adolescents, the exact cause is unknown in the majority of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pediatric psychology is a multidisciplinary field of both scientific research and clinical practice which attempts to address the psychological aspects of illness, injury, and the promotion of health behaviors in children, adolescents, and families in a pediatric health setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • At least 10% of children and adolescents have functional impairment due to a diagnosed mental health and/or substance abuse disorder (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999), and up to 25% have clinically significant problems that may not (yet) rise to the level of a diagnosable psychiatric disorder (Briggs-Gowan et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Difficulty
  • Individuals with SCD may be characterized by difficulty in using language for social purposes, appropriately matching communication to the social context, following rules of the communication context (e.g., back and forth of conversation), understanding nonliteral language (e.g., jokes, idioms, metaphors), and integrating language with nonverbal communicative behaviors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • and difficulty concentrating or focusing attention. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • Rather, there appears to be difficulty in regulating attention, so that attention is simultaneously given to many stimuli. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It is characterized by problems paying attention, excessive activity, or difficulty controlling behavior which is not appropriate for a person's age. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with attention deficits are prone to having difficulty processing verbal and nonverbal language which can negatively affect social interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • depression
  • Scientists and clinicians recognized that a small number of people exposed to the stress of various natural disasters, such as fires, hurricanes, and floods, could develop psychological sequelae such as major depression, chronic anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (cdc.gov)
  • Baum and colleagues (18) found indicators of psychophysiological effects from stress, including elevated levels of psychological distress, perceived threat, subclinical anxiety disorders, and depression in many of the community members they surveyed at TMI as compared with controls. (cdc.gov)
  • nonverbal
  • SCD is defined by a primary deficit in the social use of nonverbal and verbal communication (see Table 1 for the full list of criteria). (biomedcentral.com)
  • person's
  • Note: Only one Criterion A symptom is required if delusions are bizarre or hallucinations consist of a voice keeping up a running commentary on the person's behavior or thoughts, or two or more voices conversing with each other. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • Prevalence
  • Baird G, Simonoff E, Pickles A, Chandler S, Loucas T, Meldrum D, Charman T (2006) Prevalence of disorders of the autism spectrum in a population cohort of children in South Thames: the Special Needs and Autism Project (SNAP). (springer.com)
  • Some postulate that the chronic stress documented to occur in some communities near hazardous waste sites could possibly lead to an array of biopsychosocial effects, including physical health effects from chronic stress (possible health outcomes affected by stress include cardiovascular, gastrointestinal disorders, and skin), increases in the prevalence of certain psychological disorders, and social disruption. (cdc.gov)
  • The population of people with co-occurring disorders is heterogeneous, and the prevalence of comorbidity differs by diagnostic group. (addforums.com)
  • The prevalence of this class of disorder is thought to be between 2-5 per 1000. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinguish
  • The condition can be difficult to tell apart from other disorders, as well as to distinguish from high levels of activity that are still within the normal-range. (wikipedia.org)
  • personality
  • It is a 20-item inventory of perceived personality traits and recorded behaviors, intended to be completed on the basis of a semi-structured interview along with a review of 'collateral information' such as official records. (wikipedia.org)
  • PCL-R Factors 1a and 1b are correlated with narcissistic personality disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factor 1 has been correlated with narcissistic personality disorder, low anxiety, low empathy, low stress reaction and low suicide risk but high scores on scales of achievement and social potency. (wikipedia.org)
  • This temporary condition is not a clinical illness or a personality disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon constructed computer programs that simulated the thought processes people go through when solving different kinds of problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • traits
  • The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors may play a role in the expression of these traits as a conduct disorder (CD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in combination with CU traits seem to cause antisocial behavior even without external hardships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with conduct problems who also exhibit high levels of CU traits reflect a particularly high heritability rate of 0.81, as reflected in longitudinal research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with CU traits have more severe conduct disorder, and respond to different management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with high CU traits are less responsive to time-out and other punishment techniques than are healthy children as they are unperturbed by the threat of punishment and time-out does not seem to bother them, so their behavior does not improve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reward-based disciplining techniques, such as praise and reinforcement, tend to have a greater effect than punishing techniques on children with high CU traits in reducing antisocial behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • inventory
  • Based on the existing literature, we have generated an inventory of applied rodent behavioural testing paradigms relevant to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). (springer.com)
  • Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function [BRIEF -a parent questionnaire and a teacher questionnaire-designed to assess executive functioning in home and school environments. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Abnormal
  • Current thought among disaster relief workers holds that most people will suffer no or only transient effects from the stress of a natural disaster ( i.e. , acute stress disorder) or, in other words, 'people reacting normally to an abnormal situation' (B. Flynn, 1995, personal communication). (cdc.gov)
  • In contrast to the abnormal movements of other movement disorders (for example, choreas, dystonias, myoclonus, and dyskinesias), the tics of Tourette's are temporarily suppressible, nonrhythmic, and often preceded by an unwanted premonitory urge. (wikipedia.org)
  • etiology
  • The establishment of robust and replicable behavioural testing paradigms with translational value for psychiatric diseases is a major step forward in developing and testing etiology-directed treatment for these complex disorders. (springer.com)
  • Genetic
  • Are there genetic mediators and/ or neurobiological connections between these disorders that drive the comorbidity? (addforums.com)
  • Maltreatment and parenting may play a role in the development of antisocial behavior, but better research is needed to understand the interaction between genetic and epigenetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • Aspects of the wider community have also been implicated,[citation needed] including employment problems, socioeconomic inequality, lack of social cohesion, problems linked to migration, and features of particular societies and cultures. (wikipedia.org)