• nuclear
  • The Fermi paradox, an argument put forth by nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi in 1950, then begs the question, "If extraterrestrial beings are commonplace, where are they? (hubpages.com)
  • simulations
  • Working in parallel with the laser teams, physicists studying the expected reaction using computer simulations adapted from thermonuclear bomb work developed a program known as LASNEX that suggested Q of 1 could be produced at much lower energy levels, in the kilojoule range, levels that the laser team were now able to deliver. (wikipedia.org)
  • British
  • In 1922, Dr. Lewis Fry Richardson, a British physicist with a penchant for grand ideas, described how to forecast the behavior of the atmosphere. (nytimes.com)
  • November 1-2 - Physicist Hans Ferdinand Mayer writes the Oslo Report on German weapons systems and passes it to the British Secret Intelligence Service. (wikipedia.org)
  • The well-known British physicist and author said technology is partly to blame for the rise in income inequality. (q13fox.com)
  • work
  • These experiments led to a better understanding of the theoretical nature of the problem, which in turn led to major work by John Bryan Taylor on a general theory of high-current electric discharges in magnetic fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theoretical physicist James Clerk Maxwell is best known for his work in formulating the equations of electromagnetism. (wikipedia.org)
  • science
  • An inverse problem in science is the process of calculating from a set of observations the causal factors that produced them: for example, calculating an image in X-ray computed tomography, source reconstruction in acoustics, or calculating the density of the Earth from measurements of its gravity field. (wikipedia.org)
  • We do not see any evidence of quantum speedup in the D-Wave device ," said Matthias Troyer, a theoretical physicist at ETH Zurich, in Switzerland, and co-author of the study, detailed today (June 19) in the journal Science. (csmonitor.com)
  • The course is taught from a computer science perspective but should be accessible for physicists as well. (cwi.nl)
  • Physicists also contributed to the war effort, developing wireless communication technologies and sound-based methods of detecting U-boats, resulting in the first tenuous long-term connections between academic science and the military. (wikipedia.org)
  • paper
  • A 1992 paper by physicists Andrei Lossev and Igor Novikov labeled such items without origin as Jinn, with the singular term Jinnee. (wikipedia.org)
  • poor
  • Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution," he said in a Reddit AMA (ask me anything) post last week. (q13fox.com)
  • once
  • The biggest models have improved substantially in the last few years, with many no longer requiring ''flux adjustments'' -- essentially fudge factors -- that were once needed to prevent the machine-generated, theoretical climates from drifting out of the realm of the possible. (nytimes.com)
  • device
  • Harwell operated the largest, most powerful and most sophisticated fusion device, the ZETA (fusion reactor) machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further, the diamond nanowire is designed to overcome hurdles that have challenged other state-of-the-art systemssuch as those based on fluorescent dye molecules, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubesas the device can be readily replicated and integrated with a variety of nano-machined structures. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Or, it could be that the D-Wave's qubits are not ideal - the device uses qubit technology that is a decade old, so the bits may only stay in position for about 10 nanoseconds (10 billionths of a second), even though it takes 20 microseconds (2,000 times as long) to solve a problem, Troyer said. (csmonitor.com)
  • known
  • The proteins that regulate which genes are expressed are known as transcription factors (TFs). (bctechnology.com)
  • Comparing the driver energy input to the fusion energy output produces a number known as fusion energy gain factor, labelled Q. A Q value of at least 1 is required for the system to produce net energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • Even with the best computers, though, important parts of the climate puzzle still elude both the machines and the theoreticians, although progress is being made. (nytimes.com)
  • Helmut Hönl (February 10, 1903 in Mannheim, Germany - March 29, 1981 in Freiburg im Breisgau) was a German theoretical physicist who made contributions to quantum mechanics and the understanding of atomic and molecular structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • national
  • The system was first formally discussed in the December 1976 National Reference Designs Study, which examined the technical and economic feasibility of a machine with the design capacity of 20 TeV per proton. (wikipedia.org)
  • find
  • He does not find this paradoxical, and attributes problems regarding the validity of time travel to other factors in the interpretation of general relativity. (wikipedia.org)
  • increases
  • The resulting enhanced optical properties increases photon collection by nearly a factor of ten relative to natural diamond devices. (bio-medicine.org)
  • computers
  • Quantum computers are thought to be able to solve complex problems thousands of times faster than classical computers, and scientists have been working on developing them for more than a decade. (csmonitor.com)
  • This problem is generally believed to take exponential time on even the best classical computers, and its assumed hardness forms the basis of much of modern cryptography (particularly the widespread RSA system). (cwi.nl)
  • power
  • Derek Charles Robinson FRS (27 May 1941 - 2 December 2002) was a physicist who worked in the UK fusion power program for most of his professional career. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Kite Wind Generator (KWG) or KiteGen is claimed to eliminate all the static and dynamic problems that prevent the increase of the power (in terms of dimensions) obtainable from the traditional horizontal-axis wind turbine generators. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • The research was conducted on a D-Wave Two X machine at the USC Information Sciences Institute . (bctechnology.com)
  • Nonetheless, toward the end of the Second World War, this article, written by the 20-year-old Ambartsumian, was found by Swedish mathematicians and formed the starting point for a whole area of research on inverse problems, becoming the foundation of an entire discipline. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • He had details wrong but the basic concept right: a suite of equations that, when applied to measurements of heat, cloudiness, humidity and the like, could project how those factors would change over time. (nytimes.com)
  • H.G. Wells famously employed the concept of a higher temporal dimension in his 1895 book The Time Machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • prime
  • Later, mathematician Peter Shor showed that a quantum computer could factor an integer into prime numbers, an ability that could be used to crack encryption algorithms on the Internet. (csmonitor.com)
  • classical
  • They posed a thousand random optimization problems to the machine, and measured how long it took to solve them, compared with a classical PC. (csmonitor.com)
  • An algorithm is composed of a fixed sequence of quantum logic gates and a problem is encoded by setting the initial values of the qubits, similar to how a classical computer works. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • So even as the evidence grows that earth's climate is warming and that people are responsible for at least part of the change, the toughness of the modeling problem is often cited by those who oppose international action to cut the emissions of heat-trapping gases. (nytimes.com)
  • Shorter Stephen Hawking: 'For hundreds of years, people who claimed that machines reduce jobs have looked silly. (q13fox.com)
  • study
  • One novelty of the study was the mapping of a biological problem using actual protein-DNA binding data to a quantum chip. (bctechnology.com)
  • In basic experiments, he and his students were among the first to study Brillouin and Raman scattering, two instabilities that cause problems even in laser-produced plasmas. (ebooks.com)
  • test
  • Designed to pinpoint patients who might be helped by the drug Iressa, the new test hunts for mutations in a gene called epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ), whose protein Iressa targets. (sciencemag.org)
  • Perhaps, the scientists simply didn't test the machine on the right set of problems. (csmonitor.com)
  • modern
  • The idea of a fourth dimension has been a factor in the evolution of modern art, but use of concepts relating to higher dimensions has been little discussed by academics in the literary world. (wikipedia.org)
  • German
  • Helmut Hönl "The intensity problem of spectral lines" (Translated from the German) Annalen der Physik 79 (1926) 273-323. (wikipedia.org)
  • reach
  • the machine appeared to reach 5 million degrees, hot enough to be generating fusion at a low rate, within an order of two of the number of neutrons one would expect to generate at that temperature. (wikipedia.org)
  • towards
  • In their public statements (but not necessarily in their private statements), scientists express a generally negative attitude towards the UFO problem, and it is interesting to try to understand this attitude. (hubpages.com)
  • major
  • This presents a major problem if you want to interface a color center and integrate it into real-world applications," explains Loncar. (bio-medicine.org)
  • complex
  • They instead demonstrated a new series of problems that limited their performance and demonstrated that a successful machine would have to be larger and more complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • real
  • To date, much has been stated about the promise of quantum computing for myriad of applications but there have been few examples of a quantum advantage for real-world problems of practical interest. (bctechnology.com)
  • team
  • As the nature of these problems became clear, the ZETA team turned from attempting fusion to developing dramatically improved diagnostic tools for characterizing the plasma. (wikipedia.org)