• bast fiber
  • The chemical composition of commons natural fibers are shown below, and can change if the fibers are a bast fiber (obtained from the bark), a core fiber (obtained from the wood), or a leaf fiber (obtained from the leaves). (wikipedia.org)
  • hemp hemp, common name for a tall annual herb ( Cannabis sativa ) of the family Cannabinaceae, native to Asia but now widespread because of its formerly large-scale cultivation for the bast fiber (also called hemp) and for the drugs it yields. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It is a bast fiber, and the fiber used for textiles comes from the inner bark (phloem) of the vegetative stalks and not the woody stem or outer bark. (wikipedia.org)
  • composites
  • Besides cellulose, these fibers are compound of hemicellulose and lignin, and different percentages of these components are responsible for different mechanical properties observed.celluĺose mainly comes from gach The main applications of cellulose fibers are in textile industry, as chemical filter, and fiber-reinforcement composite, due to their similar properties to engineered fibers, being another option for biocomposites and polymer composites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon fibers are also composited with other materials, such as graphite, to form reinforced carbon-carbon composites, which have a very high heat tolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • These carbon fibers had sufficient strength (modulus of elasticity and tensile strength) to be used as a reinforcement for composites having high strength to weight properties and for high temperature resistant applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • ramie
  • 2) The use of PSPC allowed us to determine simultaneously the deformation of crystal lattice of ramie fiber in both lateral and longitudinal directions. (nii.ac.jp)
  • A bundle of 100 ramie fibers was subjected to tensile stress by using the fiber-tensioning device, and a load elongation chart was obtained by recording the three major equatorial reflections with PSPC.Analysis of similarly obtained load-elongation data for the meridional reflection gave longitudinal elastic modulus and poisson ratio of cellulose crystal, 129Gpa and 0.34, respectively. (nii.ac.jp)
  • 3) Swelling of ramie fiber by aq.Sodium hydroxice was studied by the use of PSPC and imaging plate (IP), resulting in new information. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Ishikawa, M.Wada, K.Igarashi, S.Kuga, T.Okano: 'Effect of cellulase treatment ontensile properties of M.Samejima,ramie fiber' Mokuzai Gakkaishi. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] N.Hayashi, J.Sugiyama, T.Okano, M.Ishihara: 'The enzymatic susceptibility of cellulose microfibrils of the algal-bacterial type and the cotton-ramie type' Carbohydrate Research. (nii.ac.jp)
  • istle, ramie, sisal hemp sisal hemp [from Sisal, former chief port of Yucatan], important cordage fiber obtained from the leaves of the sisal hemp plant, an extensively cultivated tropical agave (family Agavaceae or Liliaceae). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In order that a substantially biologically degradable polymer is prevented from at least partially losing its biological degradability when reinforced by additives such as fibers and the like, it is proposed that natural fibers such as, in particular, sisal or ramie fibers, be used. (google.com)
  • Ramie (/ˈreɪmi/, RAY-mee) is a flowering plant in the nettle family Urticaceae, native to eastern Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The true ramie or China grass, is also called Chinese plant or white ramie. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ramie is one of the oldest fiber crops, having been used for at least six thousand years, and is principally used for fabric production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike other bast crops, ramie requires chemical processing to de-gum the fiber. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ramie has been grown in China for many centuries and farmers in ancient China are known to have used the fiber to weave clothing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ramie is one of the strongest natural fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ramie fiber is known especially for its ability to hold shape, reduce wrinkling, and introduce a silky lustre to the fabric appearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Plant fibers tend to be better tolerated by people with sensitivities to the protein yarns, and allergists may suggest using them or synthetics instead to prevent symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some people find that they can tolerate organically grown and processed versions of protein fibers, possibly because organic processing standards preclude the use of chemicals that may irritate the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • AGPs are widely distributed in plants and typically comprise only 2 to 10% protein by weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • The protein family has been earlier reported to contain O-linked glycans, whereas recent efforts employing mass spectrometry have revealed the presence of N-linked glycans as well within this protein family isolated from elongating cotton fiber cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some plant cells, the length of the mature protein backbone is only 10-13 residues long and they are therefore called as arabinogalactan (AG) peptides. (wikipedia.org)
  • filaments
  • Tow is a continuous "rope" of fibers consisting of many filaments loosely joined side-to-side. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3 . The process of claim 2 comprising dipping the former into the polymer bath after depositing the filaments onto the former. (google.es)
  • 6 . The process of claim 2 comprising dipping the former into the polymer bath prior to depositing the filaments onto the former. (google.es)
  • 7 . The process of claim 2 comprising alternating dipping the former into the polymer bath a series of dips with at least one deposition of filaments. (google.es)
  • proteins
  • Some plant tissue-specific promoters can be utilized to express foreign proteins in specific tissues in a developmentally regulated pattern [John, 1996b, 1997a, 1997b]. (allindianpatents.com)
  • bacteria
  • Cellulose produced by bacteria and algae is enriched in Iα while cellulose of higher plants consists mainly of Iβ. (wikipedia.org)
  • Juan Hinestroza and his students live in a cotton-soft nano world, where they create clothing that kills bacteria, conducts electricity, wards off malaria, captures harmful gas and weaves transistors into shirts and dresses. (phys.org)
  • He says it actually works to interrupt the communication between the different elements in the complex (fungus, fibers, bacteria, metals, etc. (blogspot.com)
  • grown
  • Dr. Castle says he believes the boron stops the little black "seeds" from maturing into full grown "fibers. (blogspot.com)
  • Rayon
  • Cotton and viscose (rayon) yarns burn as a wick. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cellulose solution is used to spin the viscose rayon fiber, which may also be called viscose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rayon fiber is produced from the ripened solutions by treatment with a mineral acid, such as sulfuric acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those fibers were manufactured by heating strands of rayon until they carbonized. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1960 Richard Millington of H.I. Thompson Fiberglas Co. developed a process (US Patent No. 3,294,489) for producing a high carbon content (99%) fiber using rayon as a precursor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, during this period, the Japanese Government heavily supported carbon fiber development at home and several Japanese companies such as Toray, Nippon Carbon, Toho Rayon and Mitsubishi started their own development and production. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first commercial viscose rayon was produced by the UK company Courtaulds Fibers in 1905. (wikipedia.org)
  • biological
  • These fibrils can bundle to make larger fibers that contribute to the hierarchical structure of many biological materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Folks, all you have to do is review the nature of the array of materials being dispersed into our air supply (heavy metals, biological pathogens, fibers, polymers, etc.) to know these are not conducive to good health and spiritual growth. (blogspot.com)
  • inorganic
  • The natural fibers may be further classed according to origin as animal, vegetable, or inorganic fibers. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • These materials include: Low-density flexible foam used in upholstery, bedding, automotive and truck seating, and novel inorganic plant substrates for roof or wall gardens Low density elastomers used in footwear Hard solid plastics used as electronic instrument bezels and structural parts Flexible plastics used as straps and bands Cast and injection molded components for various markets -- i.e., agriculture, military, automotive, industrial, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • solvent
  • The first part of this lab was to determine the texture and color of each fiber, secondly burning different fibers to see their reaction, thirdly perform a solvent test where each fiber was tested in different solutions, forth viewing the stained fibers under a microscope. (antiessays.com)
  • fibre
  • fibre that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant ( Gossypium spp. (mcgill.ca)
  • The English name descends from the Arabic word 'al qutun', (hence also came the Spanish word 'algodón') meaning cotton fibre. (mcgill.ca)
  • Cotton production is very efficient, in the sense that, ten percent or less of the weight is lost in subsequent processing to convert the raw cotton bolls into pure fibre. (mcgill.ca)
  • When impregnated with a plastic resin and baked it forms carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (often referred to as carbon fibre) which has a very high strength-to-weight ratio, and is extremely rigid although somewhat brittle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transistors
  • PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers from France, Italy and the United States are weaving cotton with transistors for a new look in computing. (phys.org)
  • tensile
  • Plant-derived cellulose is usually found in a mixture with hemicellulose, lignin, pectin and other substances, while bacterial cellulose is quite pure, has a much higher water content and higher tensile strength due to higher chain lengths. (wikipedia.org)
  • naturally
  • The fibers are produced naturally by the plant. (coursera.org)
  • Polyesters include naturally occurring chemicals, such as in the cutin of plant cuticles, as well as synthetics through step-growth polymerization such as polybutyrate. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Substituting one, two, or three of those OHs with acetates will result in different properties of the polymer films. (pslc.ws)
  • There is clear archaeological evidence that people in India and South America domesticated different species of cotton independently thousands of years ago. (mcgill.ca)
  • The percentage of each component varies for each different type of fiber, however, generally, are present around 60-80% cellulose, 5-20% lignin, and until 20% of moisture, besides hemicellulose and a small percent of residual chemical components. (wikipedia.org)
  • 10 . The process of claim 1 comprising depositing varied quantities of fibers onto the former creating regions of different fiber deposit thickness in the elastomeric article. (google.es)
  • The whole aim of this experiment was to identify and analyzes fibers in a forensic laboratory, and to see their reactions in different conductions. (antiessays.com)
  • The main purpose is to try to find what the unknown fiber was among different fibers. (antiessays.com)
  • Differing chemical compounds will be used to produce different types of synthetic fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • consists
  • Fiber development consists of four overlapping stages (i.e. initiation, primary cell wall formation, secondary cell wall formation and maturation) [Basra and Malik, (allindianpatents.com)
  • One possibility for improving these properties consists in reinforcing biologically degradable polymers, a technique which is already known from the use of plastics. (google.com)
  • hydrogen
  • Picture a bowl full of cooked spaghetti and you'd be pretty close to what a polymer is like without hydrogen bonding (or any other kind of intermolecular interactions that are relatively strong). (pslc.ws)
  • organic
  • In our food, the purple grape is one of the richest sources of boron, so we see organic grape juice not only "off-loads" the "fibers," but also jams their ability to replicate. (blogspot.com)
  • forensic
  • In the analysis talks about how the fibers were analyzed and persevered in Forensic Science, and also how to go about finding our unknown fiber. (antiessays.com)
  • make cotton
  • Acetic acid is what gives vinegar its sour taste, but soaking the cotton balls in vinegar won't work (don't even bother -- you'll just make cotton balls that smell like pickles! (pslc.ws)
  • carbon
  • To produce a carbon fiber, the carbon atoms are bonded together in crystals that are more or less aligned parallel to the long axis of the fiber as the crystal alignment gives the fiber high strength-to-volume ratio (making it strong for its size). (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon fibers are usually combined with other materials to form a composite. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1879, Thomas Edison baked cotton threads or bamboo slivers at high temperatures carbonizing them into an all-carbon fiber filament used in one of the first incandescent light bulbs to be heated by electricity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1958, Roger Bacon created high-performance carbon fibers at the Union Carbide Parma Technical Center located outside of Cleveland, Ohio. (wikipedia.org)
  • This had produced a carbon fiber that contained about 55% carbon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within a few years, after successful use in 1968 of a Hyfil carbon-fiber fan assembly in the Rolls-Royce Conway jet engines of the Vickers VC10, Rolls-Royce took advantage of the new material's properties to break into the American market with its RB-211 aero-engine with carbon-fiber compressor blades. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 1960s, the Japanese took the lead in manufacturing PAN-based carbon fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Morganite decided that carbon-fiber production was peripheral to its core business, leaving Courtaulds as the only big UK manufacturer. (wikipedia.org)
  • These fibers contained about 85% carbon and had excellent flexural strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • They named the fiber "viscose", because the reaction product of carbon disulfide and cellulose in basic conditions gave a highly viscous solution of xanthate. (wikipedia.org)
  • marvel
  • Its development history can be summarized in the following list: In 1961, polybenzimidazole was developed by H. Vogel and C.S. Marvel with anticipation that the polymers would have exceptional thermal and oxidative stability. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanical
  • Cotton and wood, for example, are completely insoluble in water and have considerable mechanical strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is therefore an object of the present invention to propose a solution for improving the mechanical properties of biologically degradable polymers. (google.com)