• bees
  • Bees collect pollen from the plants and transport it to their honeycomb in the form of granules, which they make themselves. (botanical-online.com)
  • The granules, orange, yellow, green or brown, are formed by bees from the pollen and nectar of the plants . (botanical-online.com)
  • It is a small subfamily, unique among wasps in feeding their larvae exclusively with pollen and nectar, in a fashion quite similar to many solitary bees. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pollen basket or corbicula (plural corbiculae) is part of the tibia on the hind legs of certain species of bees. (wikipedia.org)
  • most other bees possess a structure called the scopa, which is similar in function, but is a dense mass of branched hairs into which pollen is pressed, with pollen grains held in place in the narrow spaces between the hairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bee bread is also the bee pollen with added nectar and enzymes and stored in brood cells, chambers of honeybees or of wood and mud created by female ground-nesting (such as the Leafcutting Bee) bees. (wikipedia.org)
  • whereas with honey bees, the thing to keep in mind is that the forager bees that gather pollen do not eat it themselves, since when they transition to foraging, they stop producing the proteolytic enzymes necessary to digest it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foraging bees bring pollen back to the hive, where they pass it off to other worker bees, who pack the pollen into cells with their heads. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like honey and propolis, other well-known honey bee products that are gathered rather than secreted (i.e., in contrast to royal jelly and beeswax), the exact chemical composition depends on the plants the worker bees gather the pollen from, and can vary from hour to hour, day to day, week to week, colony to colony, even in the same apiary, with no two samples of bee pollen exactly identical. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2014 Hive-stored pollen of honey bees: many lines of evidence are consistent with pollen preservation, not nutrient conversion. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1961
  • Arabella Pollen (born 22 June 1961) is an English fashion designer and, as Bella Pollen , journalist and author of five novels published between 1997 and 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daniel Pollen
  • The island is named after Daniel Pollen, who bought it in 1855. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daniel Pollen (2 June 1813 - 18 May 1896) was the son of Elizabeth (née O'Neill) and Hugh Pollen and became the ninth Premier of New Zealand, serving from 6 July 1875 to 15 February 1876. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1870, Daniel Pollen held four positions - Receiver of Land Revenue, Commissioner of Confiscated Lands, Commissioner under the Native Land Act of 1870, and Immigration Officer. (wikipedia.org)
  • L. K. Gluckman, Ann Gluckman, Mike Wagg, Touching on Deaths: a medical history of early Auckland (2000), p. 83: "DANIEL POLLEN (1813-1896) Pollen was born in Dublin although it is unknown whether he obtained his MD in Ireland or the USA. (wikipedia.org)
  • allergy
  • Although pollen is very suitable for all people, except for those who have allergy to pollen , it is especially indicated in cases of convalescence or to prevent the appearance of diseases by endowing the body with greater resistance against them. (botanical-online.com)
  • According to a study by Leonard Bielory, M.D. that was presented to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, climate changes are expected to cause pollen counts to more than double by 2040. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allergy to pollen is called hay fever . (fact-index.com)
  • Pine has the biggest pollen grains - which don't wreak as much havoc on allergy sufferers, but they're the ones that coat everything, said Ronald Hendrick, professor of forest ecology at the University of Georgia's Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. (redorbit.com)
  • allergies
  • My allergist in North Carolina tests for allergies to pine pollens, and my reaction was a 5 (out of 5), so I guess that enough of us out there are allergic to it, possibly because of the sheer volumes we've encountered. (bio.net)
  • Again, not as an expert (but perhaps due to a modern urban legend), a LARGE (but not ALL) of the problems with pine pollen 'allergies' are due more to the physical effects due to the relatively large (with SPIKES! (bio.net)
  • Bee pollen is safe for short term use, but for those with pollen allergies, allergic reactions may occur (shortness of breath, hives, swelling, and anaphylaxis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally pollens that cause allergies are those of anemophilous (literally wind-loving) plants, which produce very lightweight pollen grains in great quantities for wind dispersal, and subsequently contacting human nasal passages through breathing. (fact-index.com)
  • The late summer and fall pollen allergies are usually caused by ragweed , a common, anemophilous and inconspicuous flower. (fact-index.com)
  • Arizona was once regarded as a haven for people with pollen allergies, since ragweed does not grow in the desert. (fact-index.com)
  • and early summer grasses may also induce pollen allergies. (fact-index.com)
  • Frequently local governmental authorities publish pollen counts, estimates of the concentration of pollen grains in the air, for the purpose of indicating the relative discomfort that may be experienced by sufferers from hay fever and similar allergies . (britannica.com)
  • Corbicula
  • The pollen is transferred to the pollen comb on the hind legs and then combed, pressed, compacted, and transferred to the corbicula on the outside surface of the tibia of the hind legs. (wikipedia.org)
  • There was little formal description of the corbicula before Carl Linnaeus explained the biological function of pollen in the mid-18th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • A century later, the authors of "Imms" included only the terms scopa and corbicula in the index, with "pollen basket" in the text. (wikipedia.org)
  • exine
  • Degradation of the pollen exine and bioturbation may reduce the quality of the pollen grains and stratigraphy of the core so researchers frequently select locations where the sediments are under anaerobic conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Characteristics such as the exine sculpturing and the size and number of apertures through which the pollen tubes grow are useful as taxonomic tools. (britannica.com)
  • Honey
  • A Honey bee, covered in the purple thistle pollen digs for more reward. (smugmug.com)
  • This researcher realized that most of the participants in the study were over 100 years of age and almost all of them worked as beekeepers, so they consumed pollen and honey daily. (botanical-online.com)
  • A honey bee moistens the forelegs with its protruding tongue and brushes the pollen that has collected on its head, body and forward appendages to the hind legs. (wikipedia.org)
  • So the foragers unload the pollen they've gathered directly into open cells located at the interface between the brood and stored honey, creating a typical band of what is called beebread - the substance which is the main food source for honey bee larvae and workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite this microbial diversity, stored pollen (also called bee bread) is a preservation environment similar to honey, and contains consistently low microbial biomass. (wikipedia.org)
  • dispersal
  • Entomophilous (literally insect-loving) plants produce pollen which is relatively heavy and sticky, for dispersal by insect pollinators. (fact-index.com)
  • Because of their high resistance to decay, their widespread dispersal by wind and water, and their abundant production by plants , pollen grains are very common constituents of geologic sediments , both recent and ancient. (britannica.com)
  • microscopic
  • Pollen is a seasonal problem for millions of people around the world who suffer from allergenic reactions to the antigens embedded on the outer casing of these microscopic grains. (microscopyu.com)
  • allergen Scanning electron microscopic image of pollen from various common plants. (britannica.com)
  • Contamination
  • Nonetheless there seems to remain the potential risks of consuming bee pollen that include contamination by fungal mycotoxins, pesticides or toxic metals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Remarkably
  • Remarkably, the pollen tube's journey through the style often results in depth-to-diameter ratios above 100:1 and up to 1000:1 in certain species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, given their remarkably symmetrical structure and surface patterns, fresh and preserved pollen grains are readily recognizable under the microscope . (britannica.com)
  • nutritional
  • Accordingly, chemical and nutritional analyses of bee pollen apply only to the specific samples being tested, and cannot be extrapolated to samples gathered in other places or other times. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pollen is sold as a nutritional supplement, marketed as "bee pollen" (even though it is of course from flowers). (fact-index.com)
  • flowering plants
  • Pollen grains have a hard coat made of sporopollenin that protects the gametophytes during the process of their movement from the stamens to the pistil of flowering plants, or from the male cone to the female cone of coniferous plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • The close relationship between insects and angiosperms, as illustrated by this bee collecting pollen from the flower, may have been instrumental in the radiation of flowering plants. (blackwellpublishing.com)
  • collect
  • One method of taking the sample uses a silicone grease-covered rod, rotated in the air to collect the pollen. (wikipedia.org)
  • ovule
  • The germinated pollen tube must then drill its way through the nutrient-rich style and curl to the bottom of the ovary to reach the ovule. (wikipedia.org)
  • dust
  • ATLANTA -- All the pollen-covered cars in the South may be an eyesore to drivers, but the yellow dust might be a bandit's best friend. (redorbit.com)
  • Pollen can make it difficult for crime scene investigators to lift fingerprints from outdoor surfaces, since the dust absorbs the moisture people normally leave behind. (redorbit.com)
  • If an item is covered with pollen, the pollen is going to act like dust and the print will never be left on the item that is touched," Rowland said. (redorbit.com)
  • With a vehicle sitting outside that hasn't been washed in a long time, the pollen would adhere more to the dirt and dust already on the car," Warner explained. (redorbit.com)
  • Prints buried under pollen can still be lifted if enough of the yellow dust can be cleared, but prints made over pollen might be tougher to get, Warner said. (redorbit.com)
  • unusual
  • Pollen wasps, the Masarinae, are unusual wasps that are typically treated as a subfamily of Vespidae, but have in the past sometimes been recognized as a separate family, "Masaridae", which also included the subfamily Euparagiinae. (wikipedia.org)
  • quantities
  • Pollen is produced in such quantities that it is a significant component of the airborne constituents of Earth's atmosphere , especially in areas over continents . (britannica.com)
  • Fertilization
  • Extensive work has been dedicated to comprehend how the pollen tube responds to extracellular guidance signals to achieve fertilization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each pollen grain is a minute body, of varying shape and structure, formed in the male structures of seed-bearing plants and transported by various means (wind, water, insects, etc.) to the female structures, where fertilization occurs. (britannica.com)
  • Photographs
  • Motu Manawa (Pollen Island) Marine Reserve and features at the Department of Conservation Photographs of Pollen Island held in Auckland Libraries' heritage collections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taft said her department got upgraded cameras last year to take better photographs of fingerprints stuck in pollen. (redorbit.com)
  • subsequent
  • Numerous subsequent studies have concluded that after a few days of taking pollen, the body feels more vigorous, stronger and with a stronger vital desire . (botanical-online.com)
  • cell
  • With the Leafcutting Bee, when the pollen ball is complete, a single female lays an egg on top of the pollen ball, and seals the brood cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Analysis of the type and frequency of the pollen in each layer is used to study changes in climate or land use using regional vegetation as a proxy. (wikipedia.org)
  • A study of bee pollen samples showed that they may contain 188 kinds of fungi and 29 kinds of bacteria. (wikipedia.org)