• cutaneous
  • Common appearances of cutaneous edema are observed with mosquito bites, spider bites, bee stings (wheal and flare), and skin contact with certain plants such as Poison Ivy or Western Poison Oak, the latter of which are termed contact dermatitides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vines
  • Identify poison ivy by its glossy three leaves and its common habit of forming a dense, nasty mat of multiple stems and fence- or tree-climbing vines. (newhampshire.com)
  • Hedera
  • Poison oak is not an oak (Quercus, family Fagaceae), but this common name comes from the leaves' resemblance to white oak (Quercus alba) leaves, while poison ivy is not an ivy (Hedera, family Araliaceae), but has a superficially similar growth form. (wikipedia.org)
  • they are divided into two main groups, depending on whether they have scale-like or stellate trichomes on the undersides of the leaves: Trichomes scale-like Hedera algeriensis Hibberd - Algerian ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera colchica (K.Koch) K.Koch - Persian ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera cypria McAllister - Cyprus ivy (syn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera iberica (McAllister) Ackerfield & J.Wen - Iberian ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera maderensis - Madeiran ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera maroccana McAllister - Moroccan ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera nepalensis K.Koch - Himalayan ivy (syn. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera pastuchovii G.Woronow - Pastuchov's ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trichomes stellate Hedera azorica Carrière - Azores ivy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hedera helix L. - Common ivy (syn. (wikipedia.org)
  • The only verified hybrid involving ivies is the intergeneric hybrid × Fatshedera lizei, a cross between Fatsia japonica and Hedera hibernica. (wikipedia.org)
  • forests
  • In near-coastal forests and sandy dunes of pine and oak, poison ivy becomes the ubiquitous understory because it tolerates salt-spray and brackish flood tides. (newhampshire.com)
  • Atlantic poison oak can be found growing in forests, thickets, and dry, sandy fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • plants
  • Most plants have some sort of chemical defense system that helps protect them against predators, and the chemicals produced by poison ivy and its relatives are particularly effective. (amnh.org)
  • insect
  • It can be caused by systemic diseases, pregnancy in some women, either directly or as a result of heart failure, or local conditions such as varicose veins, thrombophlebitis, insect bites, and dermatitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • evergreen
  • Ivies are very popular in cultivation within their native range and compatible climates elsewhere, for their evergreen foliage, attracting wildlife, and for adaptable design uses in narrow planting spaces and on tall or wide walls for aesthetic addition, or to hide unsightly walls, fences and tree stumps. (wikipedia.org)
  • soils
  • The shifting soils of riverbanks, beach dunes, sand pits, as well as roadside medians and ditches just beyond fences and guardrails, are where poison ivy thrives. (newhampshire.com)