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  • humans
  • All living things produce substances to protect them from getting eaten, so the term "poison" is usually only used for substances which are poisonous to humans, while substances that mainly are poisonous to a common pathogen to the organism and humans are considered antibiotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacteria are for example a common adversary for Penicillium chrysogenum mold and humans, and since the mold's poison only targets bacteria humans may use it for getting rid of bacteria in their bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, food-industry wastewater-which may contain potato juice or milk-can be hazardous to the ecosystems of streams and rivers by consuming oxygen and causing eutrophication, but is nonhazardous to humans and not classified as a poison. (wikipedia.org)
  • In humans, heavy metal poisoning is generally treated by the administration of chelating agents. (wikipedia.org)
  • substance
  • The term "poison" is often used colloquially to describe any harmful substance-particularly corrosive substances, carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens and harmful pollutants, and to exaggerate the dangers of chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • In nuclear physics, a poison is a substance that obstructs or inhibits a nuclear reaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • fatal
  • The role of magnesium sulfate as a potential therapy in AlP poisoning may decrease the likelihood of a fatal outcome, and has been described in many studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Death usually occurs within two to six hours in fatal poisoning (20 to 40 mL of tincture may prove fatal). (wikipedia.org)
  • ATROPEN
  • The ATROPEN ® Auto-Injector is indicated for the treatment of poisoning by susceptible organophosphorous nerve agents having cholinesterase activity as well as organophosphorous or carbamate insecticides. (drugs.com)
  • substances
  • In biology , poisons are substances that cause disturbances in organisms , usually by chemical reaction or other activity on the molecular scale, when an organism absorbs a sufficient quantity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Substances not legally required to carry the label "poison" can also cause a medical condition of poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmentally hazardous substances are not necessarily poisons, and vice versa. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the medical sense, poisoning can be caused by less dangerous substances than those legally classified as a poison. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Treatment includes decontamination (this should ideally only be done by a veterinarian, due to the rapid onset of clinical signs), sedation if needed, thermoregulation (including cooling measures, if appropriate), IV fluid therapy, blood pressure and electrocardiogram monitoring, and supportive and symptomatic care. (jotform.com)
  • However, every poisoning situation is unique and appropriate treatment options are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment of poisoning is mainly supportive. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • In cases of poisoning, the procedure is usually performed in a healthcare facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnosis of poisoning usually involves measurement of plasma salicylate, the active metabolite of aspirin, by automated spectrophotometric methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Usually, one man in a kayak armed with a poison-tipped lance would hunt the whale, paralyzing it with the poison and causing it to drown. (wikipedia.org)
  • nuclear
  • Of increasing concern since the isolation of natural radium by Marie and Pierre Curie in 1898-and the subsequent advent of nuclear physics and nuclear technologies-are radiological poisons . (wikipedia.org)
  • For an example, see nuclear poison. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • N-acetylcysteine was administered inappropriately in 22.1% of the paracetamol poisoning cases at TAH and in 1.6% in the TPIC study. (journals.co.za)
  • veterinary
  • The fields of medicine (particularly veterinary) and zoology often distinguish a poison from a toxin , and from a venom . (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Lead (from lead azide or lead styphnate used in firearms) gradually accumulates at firearms training grounds, contaminating the local environment and exposing range employees to a risk of lead poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Soon after he was poisoned with VX, he stumbled into a clinic in the airport and requested medical attention. (cnn.com)
  • Poison can also enter the body through the teeth (in the controversial case of dental malpractice ), faulty medical implants , or by injection (which is the basis of lethal injection in the context of capital punishment ). (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Due to the body's inability to degrade catecholamines (e.g. epinephrine), a person suffering from mercury poisoning may experience profuse sweating, tachycardia (persistently faster-than-normal heart beat), increased salivation, and hypertension (high blood pressure). (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • Our landlord put out rat and mice poison. (webnetsecure.com)
  • Our landlord put out rat and mice poison , and never told us! (webnetsecure.com)
  • If a bird eats a mice killed with poison will it die? (webnetsecure.com)
  • This week noticed some mice around the edge of the house (we live on the edge of a woods/swamp) I had planned to use Decon in the crawl space to keep them from becoming a problem. (ridgidforum.com)
  • talk to a pest co. and find a way to deal with mice other than a product that will drive mice to thirst ,as DECON does. (ridgidforum.com)
  • available
  • Since 1992, when aluminium phosphide became freely available in the market, it had, reportedly, overtaken all other forms of deliberate poisoning, such as organophosphorus and barbiturate poisoning, in North India. (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • citation needed] Consumption of whale and dolphin meat, as is the practice in Japan, is a source of high levels of mercury poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • radioactive
  • Common features include: the ability to use extremely fine or coarse media with densities ranging from plastic to steel, the ability to use hot water and soap to allow simultaneous degreasing and blasting, elimination of dust-so silicacious materials can be used without worry, hazardous material or waste can be removed without danger-e.g., removal of asbestos, radioactive, or other poisonous products from components and structures leading to effective decontamination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spread radioactive material on- and off-base, as if it were fertilizer, to practice decontamination. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • citation needed][clarification needed] Although some of its symptoms resemble those from poison ivy, other symptoms include irritation to the eyes and to the nose, although blistering may be delayed for hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Bacteria are for example a common adversary for Penicillium chrysogenum mold and humans, and since the mold's poison only targets bacteria humans may use it for getting rid of bacteria in their bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 2000s TCAs were one of the most common cause of poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • ER One will have specialized isolation, decontamination and security features, including the ability to transform every room into a negative pressure isolation room with 100 percent nonrecirculated air, multi-modal decontamination capability throughout the facility, and portal control with zoned security protection to mitigate the emergency room as a target. (ehstoday.com)
  • A pesticide poisoning occurs when chemicals intended to control a pest affect non-target organisms such as humans, wildlife, or bees. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Administration of intravenous sodium bicarbonate as an antidote has been shown to be an effective treatment for resolving the metabolic acidosis and cardiovascular complications of TCA poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The fields of medicine (particularly veterinary) and zoology often distinguish a poison from a toxin, and from a venom. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "poison" is often used colloquially to describe any harmful substance-particularly corrosive substances, carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens and harmful pollutants, and to exaggerate the dangers of chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • plant
  • Each chapter provides in-depth information on new and emerging food preservation techniques including those relating to decontamination, drying and dehydration, packaging innovations and the use of botanicals as natural preservatives for fresh animal and plant products. (wiley.com)
  • Using the word "poison" with plant names dates from the 18th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • smoke
  • citation needed] They were primarily intended to deliver poison gas and smoke shells[citation needed], although a high-explosive shell was developed for the Nebelwerfer from the beginning. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • Heinrich Schmidt (Ross Thompson) an engineer badly contaminated in the accident, knows that the leak will poison the groundwater for hundreds of miles around and wants to warn the public. (wikipedia.org)