• insertion
  • A port consists of a reservoir compartment (the portal) that has a silicone bubble for needle insertion (the septum), with an attached plastic tube (the catheter). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it is suggested that chest radiography is not mandatory as a routine method after fluoroscopy-guided port insertion that is mainly performed by venous cutdown. (wikipedia.org)
  • ribs
  • During the warm-up for the 1.4 kilometre classic sprint on 17 February in the 2010 Olympics she skied off-course, down a bank, into a 3 m (10 ft) deep gully where she crashed on rocks breaking both ski poles, a ski tip, and sustained four broken ribs along with a pneumothorax. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the warm-up she crashed down a bank, into an unprotected 3 m (9.8 ft) deep gorge and landed on ice and rocks, sustaining five broken ribs and a pneumothorax. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiograph
  • Care must be taken to ensure that the finding on the radiograph is not an artifact from an object, such as a clothing button or monitor lead, on the external surface of the chest. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • anterior
  • Organs of the Thorax (Chest) and Abdomen, Anterior Cut-away View. (indexedvisuals.com)
  • This is usually easily determined by either direct examination or by obtaining two views of the chest, most often a posterior-anterior (or anterior-posterior) view and a lateral view. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • fluid
  • Choose the posterior or lateral interspace based on the location of the fluid from chest film and percussion of the thorax. (lsuhsc.edu)
  • Remove the fluid or air in 50ml aliquots into a sterile basin once the rubber tubing has been attached to the 3way stopcock. (lsuhsc.edu)
  • These tubes are used to drain air and fluid until the patient heals enough to take them out (usually a few days). (wikipedia.org)
  • The first chamber allows fluid that is drained from the chest to be collected. (wikipedia.org)
  • fracture
  • Not every round spot on a radiological image is a solitary pulmonary nodule: it should not be confused with the projection of a structure of the chest wall or skin, such as a nipple, a healing rib fracture or electrocardiographic monitoring. (wikipedia.org)
  • relieve
  • She earned the highest praise from other skiers, staff and the media for her amazing bravery as she attended the medal giving ceremony with a tube in her chest to relieve pneumothorax. (wikipedia.org)
  • scan
  • A chest X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan, or ultrasound is usually used to confirm its presence. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • Auto-insufflation involves forcing air up the Eustachian tube, typically by swallowing or by performing a Valsalva maneuver. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Symptoms typically include sudden onset of sharp, one-sided chest pain and shortness of breath. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulmonary
  • High resolution chest CT (HRCT): HRCT can provide important clues as to the etiology of a pulmonary nodule. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • The sudden onset of breathlessness in someone with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis, or other serious lung diseases should therefore prompt investigations to identify the possibility of a pneumothorax. (wikipedia.org)
  • drains
  • Channel style chest drains, also called Blake drains, are so-called silastic drains made of silicone and feature open flutes that reside inside the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • There may be no symptoms if the pneumothorax is small (a small amount of air in the pleural space) or there may be shortness of breath if a large amount of air is in that space. (medical-clinic.org)
  • Importantly, the volume of the pneumothorax can show limited correlation with the intensity of the symptoms experienced by the victim, and physical signs may not be apparent if the pneumothorax is relatively small. (wikipedia.org)
  • respiratory
  • This Nasogastric NG Tube & Tracheostomy Skills Simulator has been developed to aid with the instruction, training, and practice of vital tracheostomy skills and care for patients with respiratory conditions. (buyamag.com)
  • A flutter valve (also known as the Heimlich valve after its inventor, Henry Heimlich) is a one-way valve used in respiratory medicine to prevent air from travelling back along a chest tube. (wikipedia.org)