• Poultry
  • Many powerful lawmakers, mostly Democrats, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have put their weight behind the biomass plants, which burn trees, construction debris, poultry litter and agricultural mass to create alternative energy. (freerepublic.com)
  • stems
  • The young shoots of the horsetail plant, as well as the pulp that grows within the stems, is actually edible for humans, as long as it is consumed in small quantities. (ehow.com)
  • As the plant matures, the stems become very stiff and abrasive. (ehow.com)
  • The stems die back during dormancy, giving the plant its broom-like appearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the stems are about the same length, this causes the plant to often appear domed or fan-shaped when flowering. (wikipedia.org)
  • eaten
  • Further, many crackers, snack items, chips, fast foods, and canned vegetables (unrinsed) if eaten in sufficient quantities may actually be toxic to birds. (backyardchickens.com)
  • However, plants which are equally toxic - eg the Yew and the Laburnham - do not seem to be so palatable, and don't get eaten so often. (thedeppeffect.com)
  • Through research, this defense system is shown to decrease the amount of plant matter eaten by vertebrate herbivores by reducing the size of the bite a herbivore takes, the volume of a bite, or the rate at which biting occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • consume
  • However, a human would have to consume this plant for days on end, with little else in the way of food or water, to become sick. (ehow.com)
  • Like humans, they have to consume a lot of the plant to suffer ill effects, but they can consume much more in a single setting, and are more likely to be exposed to it repeatedly. (ehow.com)
  • Because excess salt is excreted via the kidneys, a bird with mild to moderate kidney dysfunction may consume toxic doses of salt readily. (backyardchickens.com)
  • Gutierrezia
  • Gutierrezia sarothrae is commonly confused with rabbitbrush, but can be distinguished by the presence of ray flowers, which rabbitbrush plants do not have. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gutierrezia sarothrae, a native North American plant, is found throughout west-central Canada (the Prairie Provinces, the western and central United States (Great Plains and regions to the west), and northern Mexico as far south as Zacatecas and Baja California Sur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gutierrezia sarothrae can be toxic to domestic sheep, goats, and cattle when consumed in large quantities, although domestic goats are moderately resistant to G. sarothrae toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gutierrezia microcephala, a native North American plant, is found throughout the southwestern United States (from California east as far as Texas and Colorado) and northern Mexico (from Baja California to Tamaulipas, Veracruz, and Zacatecas). (wikipedia.org)
  • stem
  • Along with the leaves, the stem tissue is photosynthetic, giving the plant a high photosynthetic capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stem of the plant is branching, erect, smooth and hollow (except for partitions at the junction of the leaves and stem), sometimes being purple-striped, or mottled (typically only C. maculata has the purple stripes or spots). (wikipedia.org)
  • Growing 5 to 15 meters (16 to 49 ft) in height or length, the plant stem produces tendrils to help it climb adjacent plants and structures or extend along the ground. (wikipedia.org)
  • infusion
  • A few days after the Obama Administration proudly announced its latest multi million-dollar infusion for green energy plants, a news report reveals that the government-backed projects actually infest the air with a toxic brew of pollutants. (freerepublic.com)
  • The Zuni used an infusion of the blossoms as a diuretic and to "make one strong in the limbs and muscles", and an infusion of the whole plant was used topically for muscle aches. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cahuilla used an infusion of the plant as a gargle or placed the plant in their mouths as a toothache remedy. (wikipedia.org)
  • edible
  • are often mistaken for edible plants such as kvanne (Angelica archangelica), wild celery (Apium graveolens), pignut (Conopodium majus), wild carrot (Daucus carota), wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), and water parsnip (Berula spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brown rot is not toxic, and very small affected areas can be cut out of the fruit, but unless the rot is caught immediately, the fruit will no longer be edible. (wikipedia.org)
  • matures
  • During its first year of growth, G. sarothrae produces a long, woody taproot, and numerous lateral roots as the plant matures. (wikipedia.org)
  • moderate
  • After the young branchlets have built a callus, in approximately 2 months, the cutting has to be removed from the parent and planted in sand under moderate shade. (wikipedia.org)
  • saponins
  • The plant contains saponins which accumulate in the animal liver as sapogenin glucuronide crystals, resulting in liver damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • principle
  • The toxic principle has not been identified. (msu.edu)
  • Medical treatment of poisoning may include the use of activated charcoal to decrease gastrointestinal absorption of the toxic principle along with supportive care including anticonvulsant drugs such as a benzodiazepine. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • It's common knowledge that some plants can cause serious illness or even death if consumed incorrectly - and some if consumed at all. (ehow.com)
  • The Texas State Department of Health and the National Safety Council provides a list of the state's most common toxic plants. (chron.com)
  • In "The Happening," common plants release a neurotoxin that threatens the survival of the human race. (redorbit.com)
  • Although numerous plants can create problems to horse health, the reality is that poisonings from toxic plants are not all that common under most circumstances. (msu.edu)
  • Become familiar with common toxic plants in the area, what they look like and in what season they are likely to be present. (msu.edu)
  • Pay particular attention during dry weather - many toxic plants can survive dry conditions better than common pasture grasses. (msu.edu)
  • Monitor fencerows in sacrifice areas and turnout lots - this is a common place to find toxic plants. (msu.edu)
  • The plant is extremely common in suburban and exurban areas of New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Southeastern United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Remarkable Plants of Texas: Uncommon Accounts of Our Common Natives. (wikipedia.org)
  • poison
  • If any quantity of the plant is ingested, a poison control center or doctor should be contacted immediately. (thedeppeffect.com)
  • It may be grown as a houseplant or outdoors in mostly frost-free landscapes and is not toxic to dogs if it has not been treated with any chemicals (according to the National Animal Poison Information network). (wikipedia.org)
  • Toxicodendron radicans, commonly known as eastern poison ivy or poison ivy, is a poisonous Asian and Eastern North American flowering plant that is well-known for causing Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis, an itchy, irritating, and sometimes painful rash in most people who touch it. (wikipedia.org)
  • grows
  • This is because the plant grows a very small pappus, which makes wind-borne seed distribution very inefficient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Horses
  • In general, horses instinctively stay away from most toxic plants in pasture situations. (msu.edu)
  • Hay can be a challenge because horses can't always sort the toxic plants as they do in pasture situations. (msu.edu)
  • A decoction of the plant was used by the Lakota to treat colds, coughs, and dizziness, while a concentrate made from the flowers was used by the Dakota as a laxative for horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hopi and Tewa both used the plant as a carminative, as prayer stick decorations, and for roasting sweet corn, and the Navajo applied a poultice of the plant to the back and legs of horses for unknown reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • harmful
  • This movie premise may be far-fetched, but scientists say summer is a good time to familiarize yourself with toxic plants that can be harmful to your health. (redorbit.com)
  • From personal experience, I have had at one time or another over 40 cats, and I have yet to lose one from ingesting harmful plants. (garden.org)
  • commonly
  • This bulletin covers 12 toxic plants that are commonly found in Michigan pastures and hayfields. (msu.edu)
  • Since the tissues of plants employing this defense system have a high density, the defenses, commonly spines, prickles, thorns and hair, must reside on the surface of the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • areas
  • are safe to plant and eat from in such areas? (ibiblio.org)
  • The Navajo rubbed the ashes of G. sarothrae on their bodies to treat headaches and dizziness, and also applied the chewed plant to wounds, snakebites, and areas swollen by insect bites and stings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plant makes up a large part of the diet of the collared peccary (javelina) in some areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Outside Europe and the United States the plant has been spread to many other areas beyond its native range. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Here's a list of the most toxic compounds found in plants . (everything2.com)
  • Tubocurarine chloride ( curare ) another alkaloid found in the Chondrodendron tomentsosum plant, LD 50 of 33,200, oral. (everything2.com)
  • By undergoing genetic and cell biology studies in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana , the researchers found that the ZIF2 gene produces a protein that transports zinc ions into a 'compartment' (the vacuole) of root cells, thus preventing its dispersion to other plant organs. (phys.org)
  • flowers
  • It is the zinc per se that triggers more production of a protein that then acts to retain this heavy metal in the root of plants, avoiding its toxic effects on leaves, flowers, and other aerial parts of the plant. (phys.org)
  • Plants produce multiple white flowers ΒΌ inch wide with four deeply divided petals on each. (msu.edu)
  • The lower leaves are usually shed before the plant flowers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plant flowers once in its life, then it dies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The yellow or orange flowers on a Cucurbita plant are of two types: female and male. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are male (staminate) and female (pistillate) flowers (unisexual flowers) on a single plant (monoecious), and these grow singly, appearing from the leaf axils. (wikipedia.org)
  • arid
  • entitled "In situ studies of crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchoe beharensis Drake Del Castillo, a plant of the semi-arid southern region of Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)
  • suffer
  • Editor - The Chronicle's May 12 editorial ("A blight on 'the green city' ") has done a great disservice to those of us who suffer daily from the toxic impacts of the polluting Potrero power plant. (sfgate.com)
  • grown
  • The tree has been grown extensively both in China and abroad as a host plant for the ailanthus silkmoth, a moth involved in silk production. (wikipedia.org)
  • operate
  • But those of us who have worked to close this aging power plant for years understand that the only viable plan is to build and operate the much cleaner combustion turbines. (sfgate.com)
  • If the city were to start over, the existing antiquated Mirant plant would continue to operate indefinitely, polluting the air and the bay water. (sfgate.com)
  • parts
  • All parts of the plant have a distinguishing strong odour that is often likened to peanuts, cashews, or rotting cashews. (wikipedia.org)
  • leaves
  • This plant can do this because of its ability to maintain the correct water balance in its leaves, even in periods of drought. (wikipedia.org)
  • leaf
  • The plant is susceptible to leaf blight caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, rust caused by the fungus Uromyces setariae-italicae, and root rot caused by the bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • This system involves deterring herbivores before a high stress level ensues which causes cracking in the tissue of the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Why this genetic mechanism occurs we don't know, but we hypothesize that it allows plants to save energy, by only producing more levels of the protein when it is really required. (phys.org)
  • Solasodine is a poisonous alkaloid chemical compound that occurs in plants of the Solanaceae family. (wikipedia.org)
  • moth
  • Plum is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera, including November moth, willow beauty and short-cloaked moth. (wikipedia.org)