• Poultry
  • Many powerful lawmakers, mostly Democrats, as well as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have put their weight behind the biomass plants, which burn trees, construction debris, poultry litter and agricultural mass to create alternative energy. (freerepublic.com)
  • stems
  • The young shoots of the horsetail plant, as well as the pulp that grows within the stems, is actually edible for humans, as long as it is consumed in small quantities. (ehow.com)
  • As the plant matures, the stems become very stiff and abrasive. (ehow.com)
  • The stems die back during dormancy, giving the plant its broom-like appearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the stems are about the same length, this causes the plant to often appear domed or fan-shaped when flowering. (wikipedia.org)
  • USDA
  • Texas A&M. Data related to Agave lechuguilla at Wikispecies Media related to Agave lechuguilla at Wikimedia Commons USDA Plants Profile for Agave lechuguilla (lechuguilla) University of Michigan - Dearborn: Native American Ethnobotany: Agave lecheguilla (Maguey lechuguilla) Thacker, H. 2013. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2011. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CYLA, 19 June 2011). (wikipedia.org)
  • genus
  • The Kalanchoe genus may reproduce asexually by producing plantlets on leaf margins, which when distributed on a suitable substrate will form new plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aglaonema is a genus of flowering plants in the arum family, Araceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants of the genus are native to humid, shady tropical forest habitat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abrus is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae and the only genus found in the tribe Abreae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants in this genus may also be referred to as cowbane or poison parsnip. (wikipedia.org)
  • doses
  • Because excess salt is excreted via the kidneys, a bird with mild to moderate kidney dysfunction may consume toxic doses of salt readily. (backyardchickens.com)
  • Gutierrezia
  • Gutierrezia sarothrae is commonly confused with rabbitbrush, but can be distinguished by the presence of ray flowers, which rabbitbrush plants do not have. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gutierrezia sarothrae, a native North American plant, is found throughout west-central Canada (the Prairie Provinces, the western and central United States (Great Plains and regions to the west), and northern Mexico as far south as Zacatecas and Baja California Sur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gutierrezia microcephala, a native North American plant, is found throughout the southwestern United States (from California east as far as Texas and Colorado) and northern Mexico (from Baja California to Tamaulipas, Veracruz, and Zacatecas). (wikipedia.org)
  • infusion
  • A few days after the Obama Administration proudly announced its latest multi million-dollar infusion for green energy plants, a news report reveals that the government-backed projects actually infest the air with a toxic brew of pollutants. (freerepublic.com)
  • The Zuni used an infusion of the blossoms as a diuretic and to "make one strong in the limbs and muscles", and an infusion of the whole plant was used topically for muscle aches. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cahuilla used an infusion of the plant as a gargle or placed the plant in their mouths as a toothache remedy. (wikipedia.org)
  • thorns
  • The stalks feature thorns and the plant produces large white flower blooms -- it's an intimidating plant. (upi.com)
  • Since the tissues of plants employing this defense system have a high density, the defenses, commonly spines, prickles, thorns and hair, must reside on the surface of the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leaflet clusters are alternate on the vine, and the plant has no thorns. (wikipedia.org)
  • consume
  • However, a human would have to consume this plant for days on end, with little else in the way of food or water, to become sick. (ehow.com)
  • Like humans, they have to consume a lot of the plant to suffer ill effects, but they can consume much more in a single setting, and are more likely to be exposed to it repeatedly. (ehow.com)
  • common
  • It's common knowledge that some plants can cause serious illness or even death if consumed incorrectly - and some if consumed at all. (ehow.com)
  • The Texas State Department of Health and the National Safety Council provides a list of the state's most common toxic plants. (chron.com)
  • In "The Happening," common plants release a neurotoxin that threatens the survival of the human race. (redorbit.com)
  • The plant is extremely common in suburban and exurban areas of New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Southeastern United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Remarkable Plants of Texas: Uncommon Accounts of Our Common Natives. (wikipedia.org)
  • edible
  • are often mistaken for edible plants such as kvanne (Angelica archangelica), wild celery (Apium graveolens), pignut (Conopodium majus), wild carrot (Daucus carota), wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), and water parsnip (Berula spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brown rot is not toxic, and very small affected areas can be cut out of the fruit, but unless the rot is caught immediately, the fruit will no longer be edible. (wikipedia.org)
  • matures
  • During its first year of growth, G. sarothrae produces a long, woody taproot, and numerous lateral roots as the plant matures. (wikipedia.org)
  • moderate
  • After the young branchlets have built a callus, in approximately 2 months, the cutting has to be removed from the parent and planted in sand under moderate shade. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemicals
  • It may be grown as a houseplant or outdoors in mostly frost-free landscapes and is not toxic to dogs if it has not been treated with any chemicals (according to the National Animal Poison Information network). (wikipedia.org)
  • stalks
  • The water stored in the flowering stalks of this plant, rich in salts and minerals, is sold in Mexico as a sport drink. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms
  • Here are some specific plants you should keep out of your home/garden if you have pets and the symptoms you should be on the lookout for in case your pet gets into one of them, whether at home or somewhere else. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • Provides information on the symptoms and effects of poisoning by a wide range of plants. (dmoztools.net)
  • A database, searchable by various criteria, includes pictures of plants, symptoms of poisoning and animals affected. (dmoztools.net)
  • grows
  • This is because the plant grows a very small pappus, which makes wind-borne seed distribution very inefficient. (wikipedia.org)
  • perennial
  • They are perennial herbaceous plants which grow up to 2.5 meters (8.2 ft) tall, having distinctive small green or white flowers arranged in an umbrella shape (umbel). (wikipedia.org)
  • are perennial plants that are all similar in morphology, growing up to a maximum of 2.5 meters (8.2 ft) in height. (wikipedia.org)
  • gastrointestinal
  • Medical treatment of poisoning may include the use of activated charcoal to decrease gastrointestinal absorption of the toxic principle along with supportive care including anticonvulsant drugs such as a benzodiazepine. (wikipedia.org)
  • list
  • With such an extensive list of cat/dog toxic plants, it's critical to know which ones you should keep out of reach of your pets, or better yet - pass on to someone else who doesn't have animals. (embracepetinsurance.com)
  • If your cat likes chomping on plants, this one goes on the "do not purchase" list. (mnn.com)
  • Purdue University list of plants poisonous to animals, clinical signs and the animals affected. (dmoztools.net)
  • harmful
  • This movie premise may be far-fetched, but scientists say summer is a good time to familiarize yourself with toxic plants that can be harmful to your health. (redorbit.com)
  • From personal experience, I have had at one time or another over 40 cats, and I have yet to lose one from ingesting harmful plants. (garden.org)
  • Still, if you're of the "safe rather than sorry" frame of mind, you need to know which plants are potentially harmful, and by what degree. (garden.org)
  • flora
  • Searchable database includes plant images, pictures of affected animals and presentations concerning the botany, chemistry, toxicology, diagnosis and prevention of poisoning of animals by plants and other natural flora. (dmoztools.net)
  • Horses
  • A decoction of the plant was used by the Lakota to treat colds, coughs, and dizziness, while a concentrate made from the flowers was used by the Dakota as a laxative for horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Hopi and Tewa both used the plant as a carminative, as prayer stick decorations, and for roasting sweet corn, and the Navajo applied a poultice of the plant to the back and legs of horses for unknown reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • arid
  • entitled "In situ studies of crassulacean acid metabolism in Kalanchoe beharensis Drake Del Castillo, a plant of the semi-arid southern region of Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)