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  • Medicinal Plants
  • The FRLHT ENVIS aims to emerge as a one-stop access point for information and resources on sustainable utilisation of medicinal plants across the country and a platform for exchange of ideas. (frlht.org)
  • Wild Medicinal Plants of Himachal Pradesh: An Assessment of their Conservation Status and Management Prioritisation. (frlht.org)
  • life
  • They are either natural or synthetic compounds that are applied directly to a target plant to alter its life processes and its structure to improve quality, increase yields, or facilitate harvesting etc. (cainindia.org)
  • These plants will sustain your life for an indeterminate amount of time but one mistake can lead to your ruin. (diysurvival.co)
  • species
  • There are about 300-315 thousand species of plants, of which the great majority, some 260-290 thousand, are seed plants (see the table below). (wikipedia.org)
  • Historical observations of the carnivorous syndrome in plant species have been restricted to the more obvious examples of carnivory, such as the active trapping mechanisms of Drosera and Dionaea , though authors have often noted speculation about other species that may not be so obviously carnivorous. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adding to the small but growing list, Francis Lloyd provided his own list of species suspected of carnivory in his 1942 book on carnivorous plants, though these species and their potential were only mentioned in the introduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The broader definition differs mainly in including plants that do not produce their own digestive enzymes but rely on internal food webs or microbes to digest prey, such as Darlingtonia and some species of Heliamphora . (wikipedia.org)
  • This page is an index of articles on plant species (or higher taxonomic groups) with the same common name ( vernacular name). (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Checklist of Selected Plant Families does not accept Famatina as a separate genus, but rather considers the species as synonyms for either Rhodophiala or Phycella, which belong to different subtribes of Hippeastreae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boea hygrometrica, Haberlea rhodopensis Mesembryanthemum, the plant can revive within a short period of time after a drought Tillandsia Myrothamnus flabellifolius, a plant species native to Southern Africa Xerophyta spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • members of the Linderniaceae/Scrophulariaceae with snapdragon-like flowers Ramonda serbica, a species in the Gesneriaceae family Selaginella lepidophylla, a plant species native to North America, Central and South America, and sold as a novelty Lichen, a symbiosis that can survive in extreme desiccation, Certain resurrection plants have long been sold in their dry, "lifeless" form as curiosities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The flowering plants, also known as angiosperms, Angiospermae or Magnoliophyta, are the most diverse group of land plants, with 416 families, approximately 13,164 known genera and c. 295,383 known species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rather, many different plant species live in the alpine environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some plant species are capable of self-fertilization, and some are nearly exclusively self-fertilizers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In plant breeding, people create hybrids between plant species for economic and aesthetic reasons, especially with orchids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thermogenic plants are found in a variety of families, but Araceae in particular contains many such species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant communication encompasses all communication between plants and a host of other organisms such as soil microbes, other plants (of the same or other species), animals, insects, and fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of March 2014[update] The Plant List recognises 41 accepted species (including infraspecific names): Reseda alba L. White Mignonette subsp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rheum species have been recorded as larval food plants for some Lepidoptera species including brown-tail, buff ermine, cabbage moth, large yellow underwing, and nutmeg moth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some 2000 plants species, including Dodecatheon and Heliamphora have evolved buzz pollination in which they release pollen from anthers only when vibrated at a certain frequency created exclusively by bee flight muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • conifers
  • The Plantae includes all land plants: mosses, ferns , conifers, flowering plants , and so on an amazing range of diverse forms. (berkeley.edu)
  • The motile, free-swimming sperm of bryophytes and pteridophytes, cycads and Ginkgo are the only cells of land plants to have flagella similar to those in animal cells, but the conifers and flowering plants do not have motile sperm and lack both flagella and centrioles. (wikipedia.org)
  • morphological
  • The morphological adaptations such as sticky trichomes or pitfall traps of protocarnivorous plants parallel the trap structures of confirmed carnivorous plants . (wikipedia.org)
  • The strict definition requires that a plant must possess morphological adaptations that attract prey through scent or visual cues, capture and retain prey (e.g., the waxy scales of Brocchinia reducta or downward facing hairs of Heliamphora prevent escape), digest the dead prey through enzymes produced by the plant, and absorb the products of digestion through specialized structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the majority of flowers are perfect or hermaphrodite (having both pollen and ovule producing parts in the same flower structure), flowering plants have developed numerous morphological and physiological mechanisms to reduce or prevent self-fertilization. (wikipedia.org)
  • ferns
  • The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of seed plants, ferns and lycophytes. (ipni.org)
  • 1999
  • The New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman visited the plant in the early 1990s, and described the experience as an example of globalization in his best-selling 1999 book, The Lexus and the Olive Tree. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Look Inside Toyota's Tahara Plant Friedman, Thomas L. (1999) "The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization", p. 32-33. (wikipedia.org)
  • roots
  • This virus can be transmitted mechanically, by seed, and by nematodes of the family Trichoridae when they feed on roots of susceptible plants. (umn.edu)
  • Roots and rhizoids function to anchor the plant and acquire minerals in the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Conversely, the perennial strategy may sometimes be the more effective survival strategy, because the plant has a head start every spring with growing points, roots, and stored energy that have survived through the winter. (wikipedia.org)
  • either both the leaves and roots that are pruned are no longer efficient enough nutrient acquisition-wise or that energy and resources are needed in another part of the plant because that part of the plant is faltering in its resource acquisition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because plant roots respond only to sound waves at frequencies which match waves emitted by the plants themselves, it is likely that plants can receive and transduce sound vibrations into signals to elicit behavioral modifications as a form of below ground communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence for plant mechanosensory abilities are shown when roots are subjected to unidirectional 220 Hz sound and subsequently grow in the direction of the vibration source. (wikipedia.org)
  • amounts
  • We found that edible plants contain large amounts of nanoparticles. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Botanists are not completely sure why thermogenic plants generate large amounts of excess heat, but most agree that it has something to do with increasing pollination rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plants also produce other compounds, including citric acid and anthraquinone glycosides, and the raw or cooked leaf blades are poisonous to humans and livestock if consumed in large enough amounts. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Plants have developed a number of ways to achieve this transport, such as vascular tissue , and the functioning of the various modes of transport is studied by plant physiologists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some parenchyma cells, as in the epidermis, are specialized for light penetration and focusing or regulation of gas exchange, but others are among the least specialized cells in plant tissue, and may remain totipotent, capable of dividing to produce new populations of undifferentiated cells, throughout their lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amount and complexity of tissue-formation in flowering plants exceeds that of gymnosperms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among higher plants, tissue desiccation is rare at high altitudes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The particles are placed in a vacuum chamber and the plant tissue to be engineered is placed below the chamber. (wikipedia.org)
  • biology
  • The scientific study of plants is known as botany, a branch of biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • In December, 2015, resurrection plants were featured in a TED talk given by Professor Jill Farrant , Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, South Africa, who performs targeted genetic modification of crop plants to make them tolerate desiccation by activating genes that are already there but not natively expressed in response to drought. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • nutrients
  • A protocarnivorous plant (sometimes also paracarnivorous , subcarnivorous , or borderline carnivore ), according to some definitions, traps and kills insects or other animals but lacks the ability to either directly digest or absorb nutrients from its prey like a carnivorous plant . (wikipedia.org)
  • 1984), required a plant to exhibit an adaptation of some trait specifically for the attraction, capture, or digestion of prey while gaining a fitness advantage through the absorption of nutrients derived from said prey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the strict and broad definitions require absorption of the digested nutrients stipulates that the plant must receive some benefit from the carnivorous syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • In trees for example, the structure can be built on year after year so that the tree and root structure can become larger, stronger, and capable of producing more fruit and seed than the year before, out-competing other plants for light, water, nutrients, and space. (wikipedia.org)
  • Poor productivity reasons for plant self pruning - the plant rarely prunes young dividing meristematic cells, but if a fully grown mature cell is no longer acquiring nutrients that it should acquire, then it is pruned. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungi
  • however all current definitions of "plant" exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). (wikipedia.org)
  • Since then, it has become clear that the plant kingdom as originally defined included several unrelated groups, and the fungi and several groups of algae were removed to new kingdoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chemical elements of which plants are constructed-principally carbon , oxygen , hydrogen , nitrogen , phosphorus , sulfur , etc.-are the same as for all other life forms animals, fungi, bacteria and even viruses . (wikipedia.org)
  • 1972
  • Famatina is a small genus of South American bulbous plants identified by the Chilean botanist Ravenna in 1972. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant Teacher begins in 1972 when a hippie in Oakland, California flushes a syringe of LSD down a toilet in anticipation of a police raid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Araceae
  • Epipremnum aureum - a tropical vining plant, in the Araceae , found in Northern Australia through Malaysia , Singapore and Indochina into China , Japan , Bangladesh , India and Pakistan . (wikipedia.org)
  • ethylene
  • The ripening of fruit and loss of leaves in the winter are controlled in part by the production of the gas ethylene by the plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • dormancy
  • At the largest scale are the processes of plant development , seasonality , dormancy , and reproductive control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nicotiana
  • The following plant proteins belong to this family: The flower-specific Nicotiana alata defensin (NaD1) Gamma-thionins from Triticum aestivum (Wheat) endosperm (gamma-purothionins) and gamma-hordothionins from Hordeum vulgare(Barley) are toxic to animal cells and inhibit protein synthesis in cell free systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • Cytokinins help to maintain the plant cell and expression of cytokinin biosynthesis genes late in development prevents leaf senescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • As in mitochondria, which have a genome encoding 37 genes, plastids have their own genomes of about 100-120 unique genes and, it is presumed, arose as prokaryotic endosymbionts living in the cells of an early eukaryotic ancestor of the land plants and algae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Geneticists, including plant geneticists, use this sequencing of DNA to their advantage as they splice and delete certain genes and regions of the DNA molecule to produce a different or desired genotype and thus, also producing a different phenotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • dicots
  • I'm not a plant expert, but I can tell monocots from dicots . (physicsforums.com)
  • Transformation via Agrobacterium has been successfully practiced in dicots, i.e. broadleaf plants, such as soybeans and tomatoes, for many years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Secondly
  • Secondly, being annual may allow the plants a better survival strategy, since the plant can put most of its accumulated energy and resources into seed production rather than saving some for the plant to overwinter, which would limit seed production. (wikipedia.org)
  • resemble
  • The plants first appeared in the Ordovician , but did not begin to resemble modern plants until the Late Silurian. (berkeley.edu)
  • Most conspicuous among the algae are the seaweeds, multicellular algae that may roughly resemble land plants, but are classified among the brown, red and green algae. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • A groundbreaking new study published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research titled, " Interspecies communication between plant and mouse gut host cells through edible plant derived exosome-like nanoparticles ," reveals a new way that food components 'talk' to animal cells by regulating gene expression and conferring significant therapeutic effects. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • They noted, "the cellular and molecular machinery regulating such interspecies mutualism between a plant-derived diet and the mammalian gut is not fully defined. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Green plants provide a substantial proportion of the world's molecular oxygen and are the basis of most of Earth's ecologies, especially on land. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans
  • Humans have been using cannabis plants for medicinal and recreational purposes for thousands of years, but cannabinoids themselves were first purified from cannabis plants in the 1940s. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • These distinguishing characteristics taken together have made the angiosperms the most diverse and numerous land plants and the most commercially important group to humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • structures
  • Unlike animal embryogenesis, plant embryogenesis results in an immature form of the plant, lacking most structures like leaves, stems, and reproductive structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embryogenesis occurs naturally as a result of single, or double fertilzation, of the ovule, giving rise to two distinct structures: the plant embryo and the endosperm which go on to develop into a seed. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • The role of this cell type is to support the plant in axes still growing in length, and to confer flexibility and tensile strength on tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another, somewhat similar, method plants may use to avoid freezing is supercooling, which prevents ice crystallization within plant tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • This is a pure culture of bacteria isolated from a leafy gall of an ornamental plant. (umn.edu)
  • evolutionary
  • From least to most inclusive, these four groupings are: Another way of looking at the relationships between the different groups that have been called "plants" is through a cladogram, which shows their evolutionary relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evolutionary history of plants is not yet completely settled, but one accepted relationship between the three groups described above is shown below. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some authors prefer the term "protocarnivorous" because it implies that these plants are on the evolutionary path to true carnivory, whereas others oppose the term for the same reason. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemicals
  • So we thought we'd take a look at the common questions raised about the evidence and research into cannabis, cannabinoids (the active chemicals found in the plant and elsewhere) and cancer, and address some of the wider issues that crop up in this debate. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Plants detect neighbors by means other than well-established communicative signals including volatile chemicals, light detection, direct contact and root signaling. (wikipedia.org)
  • corn
  • Using electrograph vibrational detection, structured sound wave emissions were detected along the elongation zone of root tips of corn plants in the form of loud and frequent clicks. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • On Feb. 15, U.K.-based Kent Renewable Energy Ltd. released an update of commissioning activities at the facility, known as the Kent Renewable Energy CHP plant. (biomassmagazine.com)
  • Pachira aquatica - a tropical wetland tree of the mallow family Malvaceae , native to Central and South America , known by a variety of common names including Malabar chestnut, French Peanut and provision tree, and is commercially sold under the names money tree and money plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many flowering plants bloom at the appropriate time because of light-sensitive compounds that respond to the length of the night, a phenomenon known as photoperiodism . (wikipedia.org)
  • The ancestors of flowering plants diverged from gymnosperms in the Triassic Period, 245 to 202 million years ago (mya), and the first flowering plants are known from 160 mya. (wikipedia.org)
  • When Martin experiences permanent hallucinations after a trip to the Brazilian jungle to try a local drug, caapi, (also known as a "plant teacher" because it is derived from a plant and supposedly imparts spiritual insight), he blames his visions on the caapi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whether or not UAE are used by plants as a communication mechanism is not known. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the explicit mechanisms through which sound emissions are created and detected in plants are not known, there are theories which shed light on possible mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • The investigators isolated plant derived exosome-like nanoparticles (EPDENs) from ginger, carrot, grape and grapefruit, and observed their behavior in mammalian cells (mice). (greenmedinfo.com)
  • It is well established that a plant-derived diet has great influence on regulation of mammalian host cell homeostasis, in particular, cells in the digestive system [1- (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Our findings show that exosome-like nanoparticles are present in edible fruits and vegetables and reveal a previously unrecognized strategy by which plants communicate with mammalian cells via exosome-like nanoparticles in the gut, and in particular intestinal macrophages and stem cells. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Plant cells have a number of features that distinguish them from cells of animals , and which lead to major differences in the way that plant life behaves and responds differently from animal life. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, plant cells have a cell wall which restricts the shape of plant cells and thereby limits the flexibility and mobility of plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plants can also dehydrate their cells by moving water into intercellular spaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like animals, plants have somatic mutations regularly, but these mutations can contribute to the germ line with ease, since flowers develop at the ends of branches composed of somatic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Myosins and other mechanochemical enzymes which use chemical energy in the form of ATP to produce mechanical vibrations in cells may also contribute to sound wave generation in plant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • pest
  • For customers in England and Wales, call the Plant Health Helpline on 01904 405 138 to report suspicion of a quarantine plant pest or disease, or for advice and guidance on plant health regulations. (www.gov.uk)
  • grains
  • There would still be mushrooms and algae, but there would be no fruits, vegetables, grains, or any animals (which ultimately rely on plants for their food too! (berkeley.edu)
  • Plants that produce grains, fruits and vegetables form humankind's basic foodstuffs, and have been domesticated for millennia. (wikipedia.org)
  • differs
  • This structure differs from that of the plant alpha- and beta-thionins, but is analogous to scorpion toxins and insect defensins. (wikipedia.org)
  • compounds
  • Plants communicate through a host of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be separated into four broad categories, each the product of distinct chemical pathways: fatty acid derivatives, phenylpropanoids/benzenoids, amino acid derivatives, and terpenoids. (wikipedia.org)
  • soil
  • Because sound waves travel efficiently through soil and can be produced with minimal energy expenditure, plants may use sound as a means for interpreting their environment and surroundings. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanisms
  • One prevailing idea is that carnivory in plants is not a black and white duality, but rather a spectrum from strict non-carnivorous photoautotrophs (a rose, for example) to fully carnivorous plants with active trapping mechanisms like those of Dionaea or Aldrovanda. (wikipedia.org)
  • When plants are isolated from contact, chemical, and light signal exchange with neighboring plants they are still able to sense their neighbors and detect relatives through alternative mechanisms, among which sound vibrations could play an important role. (wikipedia.org)
  • generate
  • Once operational, the plant will generate heat and power for nearby homes and Discovery Park, a center for science and innovation in Kent, England. (biomassmagazine.com)
  • defend
  • Plant defensins (Formerly gamma-thionins) are a family of small, cysteine-rich proteins found in plants that serve to defend them against parasites. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce
  • It is the plants which produce and maintain the terrestrial environment as we know it. (berkeley.edu)
  • Nuclear power plants use the heat generated from nuclear fission in a contained environment to convert water to steam, which powers generators to produce electricity. (ready.gov)
  • Nuclear power plants operate in most states in the country and produce about 20 percent of the nation's power. (ready.gov)
  • Plant embryogenesis is a process that occurs after the fertilization of an ovule to produce a fully developed plant embryo . (wikipedia.org)
  • Actually, since plants are obviously interested in growing it is arguable, that the "directive" of the average shoot cell, is to "show a profit" and produce or acquire more than enough sugar and gases than is necessary to support both it and a similar sized root cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Longbridge plant was part of a significant rapid mobilisation process which took place across Europe on the outbreak of World War I. Machines that had been used to build Austin cars were employed to produce munitions, and all the resources of the factory were harnessed to serve the armed forces. (wikipedia.org)