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  • results
  • A mere "symbol" of medicine-the sugar pill, saline injection, doctor in a white lab coat-the placebo nonetheless sometimes produces "real" results. (harvard.edu)
  • book
  • Anne Harrington 's introduction and a historical overview by Elaine Shapiro and the late Arthur Shapiro , which open the book, review the place of placebos in the history of medicine, investigate the current surge in interest in them, and probe the methodological difficulties of saying scientifically just what placebos can and cannot do. (harvard.edu)
  • At the same time, the book uses the challenges and questions raised by placebo phenomena to initiate a broader interdisciplinary discussion about our nature as cultural animals: animals with minds, brains, and bodies that somehow manage to integrate "biology" and "culture," "mechanism" and "meaning," into a seamless whole. (harvard.edu)
  • changes
  • Then, they were given a placebo pain-reliever and all of them experienced a decrease in their pain level, while their brains also showed changes, specifically in their opioid receptors, which as we know is where endorphins are received. (healsomethinggood.com)
  • clinical trials
  • Doctors have understood the power of placebos at least since they were first used in clinical trials in the '50s, but fake pills work only in certain cases. (cbsnews.com)
  • An Analysis of Clinical Trials Comparing Placebo with No Treatment" and was conducted by Dtch researchers A. Hrobjartsson and P. C. Gotzsche . (everything2.com)
  • Therefore, the use of placebos is a standard control component of most clinical trials, which attempt to make some sort of quantitative assessment of the efficacy of medicinal drugs or treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because a doctor's belief in the value of a treatment can affect his or her behavior, and thus what his or her patient believes, clinical trials are usually conducted in "double-blind" manner: that is, not only are the patients made unaware when they are receiving a placebo, the doctors are made unaware too. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2002). National depressive and manic-depressive association consensus statement on the use of placebo in clinical trials of mood disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996
  • With Schultzberg back on board instead, Placebo signed a recording contract with Caroline Records and released a self-titled debut in 1996. (listal.com)
  • citation needed] Placebo was recorded over two months in 1996 in Dublin and London and was produced by Brad Wood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Come Home" was released as the lead single from Placebo on 5 February 1996. (wikipedia.org)
  • word placebo
  • The word placebo itself originated from the Latin phrase for I shall please. (wikipedia.org)
  • An obsolete usage of the word placebo was to mean someone who came to a funeral, claiming (often falsely) a connection with the deceased to try to get a share of any food and/or drink being handed out. (wikipedia.org)
  • they were so labelled because they sang the word "placebo", not because they were "choral placaters", using their song to please. (wikipedia.org)
  • morphine
  • Testing from the late 1950s onwards on narcotic analgesics like morphine also has used dicyclomine as an active placebo, and on some occasions it was reported to cause the Straub mouse tail reaction, as do most narcotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this experiment approximately 162 postoperative patients were observed for significant pain relief from subcutaneous injections of placebo and morphine. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatments
  • In a survey of UK GPs, 97% said they'd recommended placebo treatments to their patients, with some doctors telling patients that the treatment had helped others without telling them that it was a placebo. (slashdot.org)
  • While some doctors admitted to using a sugar pill or saline injection, some of the placebos offered had side effects such as antibiotic treatments used as placebos for vial infections. (slashdot.org)
  • While examples of placebo treatments can be found, defining the placebo concept remains elusive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such intentionally inert placebo treatments can take many forms, such as a pill containing only sugar, a surgery where nothing efficacious is actually done (just an incision and sometimes some minor touching or handling of the underlying structures), or a medical device (such as an ultrasound machine) that is not actually turned on. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • If the researchers are failing to develop drugs that beat placebo and the company's bottom line is suffering, it's not the fault of the sugar pill. (slashdot.org)
  • By evoking such uplifting associations, researchers say, the ads set up the kind of expectations that induce a formidable placebo response. (slashdot.org)
  • Researchers should declare the ingredients of their placebos. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Such tests allow the researchers to separate the actual medical effects aside from possible mentally-caused effects (e.g. " side effects " or suddenly getting better from the placebo). (everything2.com)
  • When going through the results that involved some 7,500 patients, the researchers excluded all tests that did not compare placebo and no treatment at all . (everything2.com)
  • We found little evidence in general that placebos had powerful clinical effects" the researchers wrote. (everything2.com)
  • The experiment displayed no significant difference between drug treatment and placebo treatment, leading the researchers to conclude that the drug exerted no specific effects in relation to the conditions being treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its purpose is to bring together researchers who are examining the placebo response and the impact of medical ritual, the patient-physician relationship and the power of imagination, hope, trust, persuasion, compassion and empathic witnessing in the healing process. (wikipedia.org)
  • PiPS researchers include many of the founding members of the field of placebo studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • significantly
  • In the intention-to-treat (ITT) population, pain reduction in VAS at day 182 in the CS group (-42.6 mm) and in celecoxib group (-39.5 mm) was significantly greater than the placebo group (-33.3 mm) (p=0.001 for CS and p=0.009 for celecoxib), while no difference observed between CS and celecoxib. (nih.gov)
  • Similar trend for the LI, as reduction in this metric in the CS group (-4.7) and celecoxib group (-4.6) was significantly greater than the placebo group (-3.7) (p=0.023 for CS and p=0.015 for celecoxib), no difference was observed between CS and celecoxib. (nih.gov)
  • Consequently, while not purely a placebo, the thermostat in this setup does not provide the level of control that is expected, but the combination of the lower setting number and the feeling of a slight change in temperature can induce the office occupants to believe that the temperature was significantly decreased. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chaucer's Merchant's Tale contains a character called Placebo, and other significantly named characters: January: the old, blind knight, with hair as white as snow. (wikipedia.org)
  • conclude
  • The authors propose a reporting scheme for placebos and conclude that silence, in this case, is far from golden. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • singer
  • From that, a singer of placebo became associated with someone who falsely claimed a connection to the deceased to get a share of the funeral meal, and hence a flatterer, and so a deceptive act to please. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiological
  • Brain imaging techniques done by Emeran Mayer, Johanna Jarco and Matt Lieberman showed that placebo can have real, measurable effects on physiological changes in the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • They then reviewed how the test subjects receiving no treatment compared to those receiving placebos. (everything2.com)
  • Placebos did appear to produce small benefits in studies in which the outcome being measured was subjective and continuous, and in trials of pain treatment. (everything2.com)
  • A placebo may be given to a person in order to deceive the recipient into thinking that it is an active treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • An active placebo is a placebo that produces noticeable side effects that may convince the person being treated that they are receiving a legitimate treatment, rather than an ineffective placebo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • but "does the treatment work better than a placebo treatment, or no treatment at all? (wikipedia.org)
  • Placebos are not the only possible technique for creating "blindness" (= unawareness of the treatment): to test the effectiveness of prayer by others, the participants are not told who has and has not had prayers said for them. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduction
  • CS and celecoxib showed a greater significant reduction in pain and LI than placebo. (nih.gov)
  • For example, Khan published a meta-analysis of studies of investigational antidepressants and found a 30% reduction in suicide and attempted suicide in the placebo groups and a 40% reduction in the treated groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • 20th
  • Around the same time, Placebo recorded a cover of T. Rex's '20th Century Boy' for Velvet Goldmine, a movie in which the trio also appeared. (listal.com)
  • Accordingly, placebos were widespread in medicine until the 20th century, and were often endorsed as necessary deceptions. (wikipedia.org)
  • rarely
  • Perhaps due to the mistaken assumption that placebos are 'inactive', the ingredients of placebos are rarely divulged in any detail. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • It has been shown that "mock" surgery can have similar effects,[citation needed] and so some surgical techniques must be studied with placebo controls (rarely double blind, due to the difficulty involved). (wikipedia.org)
  • studies
  • The site actually has some good information about placebo studies. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • What they found, apparently, was that for most of the 114 studies cited, there was little or no benefit to taking placebos over avoiding treament altogether. (everything2.com)
  • At the Royal London Hospital in 1933, William Evans and Clifford Hoyle experimented with 90 subjects and published studies which compared the outcomes from the administration of an active drug and a dummy simulator ("placebo") in the same trial. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nearly all studies conducted find benefit in the placebo group. (wikipedia.org)
  • dummy
  • A prospective, randomised, 6-month, 3-arm, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo and celecoxib (200 mg/day)-controlled trial assessing changes in pain on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and in the Lequesne Index (LI) as coprimary endpoints. (nih.gov)
  • A "dummy" version of a drug (e.g. placebo pill ). (everything2.com)
  • versus
  • Pharmaceutical-grade Chondroitin sulfate is as effective as celecoxib and superior to placebo in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: the ChONdroitin versus CElecoxib versus Placebo Trial (CONCEPT). (nih.gov)
  • response
  • I'm not an expert, but aren't results like "Placebo response in asthma: a robust and objective phenomenon" ME Kemeny et al. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • Two comprehensive analyses of antidepressant trials have uncovered a dramatic increase in placebo response since the 1980s. (slashdot.org)
  • In 1957, a team led by Wolf at Cornell University Medical School conducted an experiment to determine the reliability of the placebo response within the placebo study. (wikipedia.org)
  • alternative
  • The discography of Placebo, an English alternative rock band, consists of seven studio albums, three compilation albums, six extended plays, and thirty-one singles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Come Home" is a song by English alternative rock band Placebo. (wikipedia.org)
  • band
  • One of Hewitt's first performances with Placebo upon returning proved to be a big one, as David Bowie -- a fan of the band, not to mention an influence on its sound -- personally invited the trio to play his 50th birthday bash at New York's Madison Square Garden in 1997. (listal.com)
  • better
  • But when I saw that I felt better, I'm thinking, 'Well, maybe he just told me it was a placebo. (cbsnews.com)
  • But it worked: He says roughly 60 percent of the subjects in his study reported getting better, even though they knew they were taking a placebo. (cbsnews.com)
  • I've always wondered about the fact that a drug generally has to perform better than a placebo to get approved. (marginalrevolution.com)
  • People insist on antibiotics, but antibiotics are no better than placebos on viral infections, and placebos don't cause antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria to evolve. (slashdot.org)
  • Medicine
  • In a new research report, a team of investigators, including STS philosopher of medicine, Dr Jeremy Howick, shows the extent of non-description about placebos. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • A guy dressed in a white lab coat, doing an experiment, gives you some medicine and tells you: "This is a placebo. (slashdot.org)
  • The May 24, 2001 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine carried two pieces questioning the effectiveness of the placebo in certain circumstances. (everything2.com)
  • Sometimes administering or prescribing a placebo merges into fake medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intentional ignorance: a history of blind assessment and placebo controls in medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Placebos are everywhere in medical research, but its hard to tell if the placebos in one study are the same as those used in another study. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • I don't have access to the text of the study, but the Journal of the American Medical Association reports that the study was a survey of clinical drug trials in which there were both placebo and no treatement control groups , and compared the effectiveness of those two courses of action. (everything2.com)
  • Placebos are an important methodological tool in medical research. (wikipedia.org)
  • practice
  • This problem impacts directly on routine clinical practice since failure to list placebo ingredients undermines the perceived benefit of 'active' drugs. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • As long as individuals get the result they are looking for (noise associated with temperature change) they will continue with the practice (changing the placebo thermostat). (wikipedia.org)
  • given
  • This is done by blind or double-blind testing, in the former the patient doesn't know it's been given a placebo , in the latter the doctor giving the drug doesn't know he or she is giving a placebo (to filter out the influencing of a second person). (everything2.com)
  • side
  • He says people even report side effects from placebos. (cbsnews.com)
  • In any study of a drug's effectiveness, the rate of success and side effects are statistically compared to see how much good /harm the drug is doing compared to placebo. (everything2.com)
  • active
  • In a 2005 study assessing the effects of these painkillers on neuropathic pain, lorazepam was chosen as an active placebo because it is not a painkiller but it does cause sleepiness and can cause dizziness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clonidine is now finding more use as an active placebo for narcotics as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • trial
  • homeopathic placebo-controlled trial, which means the placebo is actually undiluted. (slashdot.org)
  • Failure to adequately describe placebos leads to three problems for placebo controlled trials: (1) they are difficult to appraise for internal validity, (2) they are difficult to replicate, and (3) they compromise cross-trial comparisons of effectiveness. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • However, the rise of the placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial (RCT), it became widely known throughout the academic community that placebo effects could in fact result in clinical changes and results. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such a test or clinical trial is called a placebo-controlled study, and its control is of the negative type. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • In 1903 Richard Cabot said that he was brought up to use placebos, but he ultimately concluded by saying that "I have not yet found any case in which a lie does not do more harm than good. (wikipedia.org)