• stigmasterol
  • Stigmasterol (also known as Wulzen anti-stiffness factor) is a plant sterol, or phytosterol. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stigmasterol is an unsaturated phytosterol occurring in the plant fats or oils of soybean, calabar bean, and rape seed, and in a number of medicinal herbs, including the Chinese herbs Ophiopogon japonicus (Mai men dong), in Mirabilis jalapa and American Ginseng. (wikipedia.org)
  • Black Pepper leaf extract (Piper nigrum) Red Stinkwood (Pygeum africanum) Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens, active substance possibly lauric acid)The berries of saw palmetto (Serenoa repens), a small palm native to the south east United States, possess a dual 5a-reductase inhibition activity, due to their high content of phytosterols: β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, lupeol, lupenone, and cycloartenol. (wikipedia.org)
  • ingredients
  • However, the availability of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ingredients are expected to emerge as potential substitutes and hinder the growth of the phytosterols market. (tmrresearch.com)
  • This is because these ingredients offer similar benefits of regulating brain functioning, reducing carcinogenic risks, and maintaining heart rate that are offered by phytosterols. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Phytosterols are being widely used as food ingredients, hence increasing its demand in the food and beverage industry. (sbwire.com)
  • concentrations
  • In another study of men with heart disease, the subset of those men with the highest risk of heart attack were at three times greater risk if they had high concentrations of phytosterols in the blood ( 13 ). (healthline.com)
  • nutritionists
  • Feed manufacturers and animal nutritionists are focusing on the development of functional animal products (poultry, milk, and meat) enriched with phytosterol, which is important for improving health and meat quality for human consumption. (pitchengine.com)
  • prevention
  • For example, The German Drug Commission, France's Food Standards Agency (ANSES) and UK's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) all recommend against the use of phytosterols for heart disease prevention ( 1 , 16 ). (healthline.com)
  • supplements
  • Products with phytosterols are generally well-tolerated, but some supplements may cause nausea, upset stomach, constipation, appetite changes and flatulence, explains pharmacist Jennifer Moll for About.com. (reference.com)
  • health
  • Even though many health authorities like the American Heart Association still recommend phytosterols to improve heart health, others disagree. (healthline.com)