• enough phenol
  • Interesting, we distill enough phenol for over 6 months (eg. (bio.net)
  • By the time the plot was discontinued, it had succeeded in diverting enough phenol, according to Albert, to make about 4.5 million pounds of explosives. (wikipedia.org)
  • The public pressure soon forced Schweitzer and Edison to end the phenol deal, with the embarrassed Edison subsequently sending his excess phenol to the U.S. military, but by that time the deal had netted the plotters over two million dollars and there was already enough phenol to keep Bayer's aspirin plant running. (wikipedia.org)
  • acid
  • Phenol , also known as phenolic acid , is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C 6 H 5 OH. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compared to aliphatic alcohols , phenol is about 1 million times more acidic, although it is still considered a weak acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol, also known as carbolic acid, is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH. (wikipedia.org)
  • The phenoxide anion has a similar nucleophilicity to free amines, with the further advantage that its conjugate acid (neutral phenol) does not become entirely deactivated as a nucleophile even in moderately acidic conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol reacts with dilute nitric acid at room temperature to give a mixture of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol while with concentrated nitric acid, more nitro groups get substituted on the ring to give 2,4,6-trinitrophenol which is known as picric acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol is easily neutralized by sodium hydroxide forming sodium phenate or phenolate, but being weaker than carbonic acid, it cannot be neutralized by sodium bicarbonate or sodium carbonate to liberate carbon dioxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this method, a mixture of TE (or Tris-Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and phenol is combined with an equal volume of an aqueous DNA sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol is a useful compound for breaking down superfluous cell materials that would otherwise contaminate the nucleic acid sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two reasons why phenol makes such an effective purifier for nucleic acid samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a weak acid with pKa = 8.00 at 20 °C (68 °F). A solution of phenol red is used as a pH indicator, often in cell culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • compound
  • It is a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. (wikipedia.org)
  • To calculate phenol coefficient, the concentration of phenol at which the compound kills the test organism in 10 minutes, but not in 5 minutes, is divided by the concentration of the test compound that kills the organism under the same conditions (or, probably more common, dividing the dilution factor at which the tested substance shows activity by the dilution factor at which phenol shows comparable activity). (wikipedia.org)
  • ingredient
  • In the United States, Phenol may be used as an active ingredient in OTC drug products. (ewg.org)
  • When used as an active drug ingredient, the established name is Phenol. (ewg.org)
  • chemical
  • PHENOL International Programme on Chemical Safety Poisons Information Monograph 412 Chemical 1. (inchem.org)
  • Schweitzer, with money funneled from Germany through Albert, set up a contract for a front company called the Chemical Exchange Association to buy all of Edison's excess phenol. (wikipedia.org)
  • excess
  • Edison's excess phenol seemed destined for American trinitrophenol production, which would be used to support the British. (wikipedia.org)
  • Substance
  • When listed numerically, the figure expressing the disinfecting power of a substance by relating it to the disinfecting power of phenol may be a function of the standardized test performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Phenol red is provided as a concentrated stock solution of 33 mM in water. (atcc.org)
  • The second is that phenol has a density of 1.07 g/cm3, which is higher than the density of water (1.00 g/cm3). (wikipedia.org)
  • High levels of bromine can convert phenol red to bromophenol red (dibromophenolsulfonephthalein, whose lowered pKa results in an indicator with a range shifted in the acidic direction - water at pH 6.8 will appear to test at 7.5). (wikipedia.org)
  • Being thermosets, hydroxymethyl phenols will crosslink on heating to around 120 °C to form methylene and methyl ether bridges through the elimination of water molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • largely
  • The Phenol coefficient, is now largely of historical interest, although the principles upon which it is based are still used. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Auramine phenol stain is a stain used in clinical microbiology and histology to identify tuberculosis mycobacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Although pipettes and micropipette tips are usually resistant, phenol is known to attack polycarbonate plastic (clear and hard). (bionity.com)
  • Phenol red (also known as phenolsulfonphthalein or PSP) is a pH indicator frequently used in cell biology laboratories. (wikipedia.org)
  • names
  • Other names in common use include phenol hydroxylase, and phenol o-hydroxylase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other names in common use include beta-tyrosinase, and L-tyrosine phenol-lyase (deaminating). (wikipedia.org)
  • Other names in common use include UDPglucosyltransferase, phenol-beta-D-glucosyltransferase, UDP glucosyltransferase, UDP-glucose glucosyltransferase, and uridine diphosphoglucosyltransferase. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • For the group of chemicals containing a phenol group, see Phenols . (wikipedia.org)
  • However, phenol's ring is so strongly activated-second only to aniline-that bromination or chlorination of phenol leads to substitution on all carbon atoms ortho and para to the hydroxy group, not only on one carbon. (wikipedia.org)
  • In several sources, the structure of phenol red is shown with the sulfur atom being part of a cyclic group, similar to the structure of phenolphthalein. (wikipedia.org)
  • The initial reaction in all cases involves the formation of a hydroxymethyl phenol: HOC6H5 + CH2O → HOC6H4CH2OH The hydroxymethyl group is capable of reacting with either another free ortho or para site, or with another hydroxymethyl group. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Phenol exerts a marked corrosive action on any tissue of contact when ingested, inhaled or after skin exposure. (inchem.org)
  • Since the color of phenol red can interfere with some spectrophotometric and fluorescent assays, many types of tissue culture media are also available without phenol red. (wikipedia.org)
  • careful
  • Schweitzer sold the remainder of the phenol at a considerable profit, being careful to distribute it to only non-war-related industries. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • There are two types of auramine phenol stains, 1 and 2 to stain mycobacterium species and cryptosporidium respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • indicator
  • i.e. the phenol red can be seen as an indicator of the process. (bio.net)
  • Phenol red, sometimes labelled with a different name, such as "Guardex Solution #2", is used as a pH indicator in home swimming pool test kits. (wikipedia.org)
  • production
  • The Great Phenol Plot was a conspiracy by the German Government during the early years of World War I to divert American-produced phenol away from the manufacture of high explosives that supported the British war effort, to the production of aspirin by the German-owned Bayer company, who could no longer import phenol from Britain. (wikipedia.org)
  • phase
  • The acidities of phenol and acetone enol diverge in the gas phase owing to the effects of solvation . (wikipedia.org)
  • volume
  • A sample larger than 700μL will not fit in the tube with a volume of phenol. (bionity.com)
  • Add an equal volume of phenol to the tube. (bionity.com)
  • Using aseptic technique and working in a laminar flow hood or biosafety cabinet, transfer the appropriate volume of Phenol Red to complete media. (atcc.org)
  • form
  • Phenol exhibits keto-enol tautomerism with its unstable keto tautomer cyclohexadienone, but only a tiny fraction of phenol exists as the keto form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phenol therefore exists essentially entirely in the enol form. (wikipedia.org)