• engulfs
  • In cell biology, phagocytosis (from Ancient Greek φαγεῖν (phagein) , meaning 'to devour', κύτος, (kytos) , meaning 'cell', and -osis, meaning 'process') is the process by which a cell-often a phagocyte or a protist-engulfs a solid particle to form an internal compartment known as a phagosome. (wikipedia.org)
  • engulfment
  • We find a whole range of different engulfment behaviors with some ellipsoids engulfing faster than spheres, and that phagocytosis is able to engulf a greater range of target shapes than other types of endocytosis. (pnas.org)
  • soluble
  • When activated, microglia undergo morphological changes to ameboid, proliferate, migrate toward injured areas, and release many soluble factors and phagocytosis of foreign substances or unwanted self-debris. (hindawi.com)
  • Phagoptosis is normally caused by: the cell exposing on its surface so-called "eat-me" signals, and/or the cell no longer exposing "don't-eat-me" signals and/or the cell being opsonised i.e. binding soluble proteins that tag the cell for phagocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • In ciliates there is a specialized groove or chamber in the cell where phagocytosis takes place, called the cytostome or mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emperipolesis is unlike phagocytosis, in which the engulfed cell is killed by the lysosomal enzymes of the macrophage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phagoptosis is a type of cell death caused by the cell being phagocytosed (i.e. eaten) by another cell, and therefore this form of cell death is prevented by blocking phagocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phagocytosis of an otherwise-viable cell may occur because the cell is recognised as stressed, activated, senescent, damaged, pathogenic or non-self, or is misrecognised. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • For example, phagocytosis is typically highly active and involves the membrane extending outward, with finger-like protrusions surrounding the target in an actin-dependent process ( 8 , 9 ). (pnas.org)
  • proteins
  • Yersinia inhibits phagocytosis through the concerted actions of several effector proteins, including YopE which acts as a RhoGAP and inhibits Rac-dependent actin polymerization. (wikipedia.org)
  • thus
  • thus pharmacological potentiation of phagocytosis has a medical potential in treatment of certain forms of autoimmune disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recent
  • The present paper summarizes recent evidences on implication of microglial chemotaxis and phagocytosis in AD pathology and discusses the mechanisms related to chemotaxis toward injured neurons and phagocytosis of unnecessary debris. (hindawi.com)
  • work
  • In 1954, Stähelin successfully applied for a 12-month postdoctoral fellowship sponsored by the Swiss National Foundation (SNF) to work on a project on phagocytosis inspired by Emanuel Suter (then at Harvard, later second Dean of the University of Florida Medical School). (wikipedia.org)
  • lack
  • It has been suggested that the lack of microglial phagocytosis worsens pathology of AD and induces memory impairment. (hindawi.com)
  • forms
  • Some retinal degenerative diseases (e.g., some forms of Stargardt disease) are thought to be caused by problems with this phagocytosis. (blindness.org)
  • series
  • Continuing our research on Mycobacteria kansasii phagocytosis inhibition, we have examined in that context three series of peptides derived from the RGDVY and GRGD sequences. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • often
  • In particular, for the first time, to our knowledge, it allows us to examine the orientation dependence of phagocytosis, to explain the shape dependence of phagocytosis and receptor-meditated endocytosis, and to explain why nonspherical targets often engulf faster when the most highly-curved tip is engulfed first. (pnas.org)