• conduction
  • Some typical uses of conduction anesthesia for acute pain are: Labor pain (epidural anesthesia, pudendal nerve blocks) Postoperative pain (peripheral nerve blocks, epidural anesthesia) Trauma (peripheral nerve blocks, intravenous regional anesthesia, epidural anesthesia) Chronic pain is a complex and often serious condition that requires diagnosis and treatment by an expert in pain medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • The conduction of electric impulses follows a similar mechanism in peripheral nerves, the central nervous system, and the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effects of local anesthetics are, therefore, not specific for the signal conduction in peripheral nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • diuretics
  • Once ascites is present, most therapeutic modalities are directed on maintaining negative sodium balance, including salt restriction, bed rest and diuretics. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A minority of patients can be treated medically with sodium restriction, diuretics to control ascites, anticoagulants such as heparin and warfarin, and general symptomatic management. (wikipedia.org)
  • collateral
  • Characterized by increased venous pressure in the portal circulation, spleenomegaly, large collateral veins, ascites, systemic HTN, and esophageal varices **vascular congestion throughout the portal system. (cram.com)
  • severe
  • Bone marrow compensatory reaction: Erythroid hyperplasia with accelerated production of red cells, reflected by reticulocytosis, and slight macrocytosis in peripheral blood Expansion of bone marrow in infants and children with severe chronic hemolysis - changes in bone configuration visible on X-ray The balance between red cell destruction and marrow compensation determines the severity of anemias. (wikipedia.org)
  • systemic
  • Whether these systemic abnormalities are the effect or cause of ascites has been controversial. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Rocco and Ware [ 2 ] review the two older competing hypotheses: 1) the "underfill" theory in which ascites formation is the primary event causing the systemic changes, versus 2) the "overflow" theory in which renal sodium retention is the primary event. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This focus on renal and systemic effects has led investigators to lose sight of the local factors within the peritoneal cavity that actually are responsible for the accumulations of ascites. (biomedsearch.com)
  • cell
  • While an assistant at Pavia, he demonstrated with a severed peripheral nerve, that the stump attached to the cell body was able to survive and regenerate new branches, while its other stump, being detached from the cell body, degenerated. (wikipedia.org)