• spouse
  • Dependent - A family member (spouse, child, partner) of the person with a health insurance policy. (aarpmedicareplans.com)
  • Payment of the required fees The spouse or child of a member of the United States Armed Forces or of a civilian employee of the United States government stationed abroad on official orders may use a United States Permanent Resident Card to enter the United States, even if the Permanent Resident Card has expired. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Returning Resident (SB-1) immigrant visa would not be required as long as the person has not abandoned Lawful Permanent Resident status and the spouse or parent is also returning to the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • hospitals
  • Since March public hospitals' fees have risen by 30 percent, and 60 percent in the case of those with financial autonomy. (vietreader.com)
  • People now fearing hospitals are going without treatment for other diseases, like malaria, which kills around 600,000 each year, 90 percent of them in Africa. (afro.com)
  • Chinese General Hospital and Medical Center (CGHMC), one of the oldest hospitals in the Philippines, founded during the Spanish occupation in the country from charitable donations of Chinese immigrants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some private hospitals operating while the national healthcare plan was instituted (for example, the Shouldice Hernia Centre in Thornhill, Ontario) continue to operate, but they may not bill additional charges for medical procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinics
  • The original intention of implementing the Telephone Appointment Booking Service (Telephone Appointment Service) of general outpatient clinics (GOPCs) is to prevent patients from having to visit clinics in person and spend much time on waiting for consultation quotas, as well as to alleviate the crowded queueing conditions in clinics. (gov.hk)
  • The worker pays several hundred dollars for medical billing software, but will later discover that most medical clinics process their own bills, outsource their billing to established firms rather than individuals, or have stricter requirements than the purchased software can provide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scheme
  • To qualify a patient must hold a Drugs Payment Scheme Card, for which everyone who does not hold a Medical Card is eligible. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Scheme of Medical Service for Scotland. (wikipedia.org)
  • The true purpose of such an offer is for the perpetrator to extort money from the victim, either by charging a fee to join the scheme, or requiring the victim to invest in products whose resale value is misrepresented. (wikipedia.org)
  • After paying a small $2 fee to join the scheme, the victim is sent a flyer template for the self-same work-from-home scheme, and instructed to post these advertisements around their local area - the victim is simply "stuffing envelopes" with flyer templates that perpetuate the scheme. (wikipedia.org)
  • paid
  • Fees paid by the DPP to 169 lawyers in 2009 were €15.2m in 2009 up 11% on 2008 and from €10.2m in 2004. (irisheconomy.ie)
  • The proposals would cancel government reforms which introduced doctor visit fees paid per visitation and medical fees paid per number of days spent in hospital as well as tuition fees in higher education. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hundreds of people paid the usual shilling entrance fee to see his carcass butchered, and then dissected by doctors and medical students from the Royal College of Surgeons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some common offers fitting this description are acting as extras, mystery shopping (which in reality requires hard work, is paid close to minimum wage, and most importantly, does not require an up-front fee to join) and working as a nanny. (wikipedia.org)
  • providers
  • Under federal guidelines issued last year, health providers are permitted to charge fees for labor, costs of creating electronic or paper copies of records and postage, Dr. Harlan Krumholz of Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues write in JAMA Internal Medicine. (reuters.com)
  • Even though these guidelines suggest a maximum flat fee of $6.50 for electronic copies of digital records, most state laws and healthcare providers still set per-page copy fees that can add up to much higher costs for patients, the doctors note in their "Viewpoint" article. (reuters.com)
  • Some healthcare providers, like the Veterans Health Administration, make it easy for patients to go online and download their medical records with just a few mouse clicks, and no fees, Krumholz and colleagues note. (reuters.com)
  • It wouldn't take much to licence new course providers for Barristers, thereby lifting the cap on places and injecting some healthy competition to the setting of legal fees. (irisheconomy.ie)
  • and connecting many social agencies, the Health Department, and medical providers with one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctors
  • One day, I fear, it will be illegal for doctors to save the lives of suicide victims if they state they don't want medical treatment. (nationalreview.com)
  • Reuters Health) - Even though U.S. patients are supposed to have easy access to electronic copies of their medical records, copy fees can prevent people from getting this information when they need it, some doctors argue. (reuters.com)
  • The U.N. agency's announcement was immediately criticized by Doctors Without Borders, a medical charity running many of the treatment centers in West Africa. (afro.com)
  • One of the most popular doctors during his time, Dr. Manuel Tee Han Kee became the first medical director and the new hospital was inaugurated in 1921. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Those ID patients co-occurring with schizophrenia consumed more annual inpatient fee than those without schizophrenia (251,346 vs. 126,666 NTD) (p less than 0.001). (ed.gov)
  • The increase in hospital fees would apply for uninsured patients starting later this year to encourage them to buy health insurance, she added. (vietreader.com)
  • But costs can far exceed that, based on researchers' estimates of fees in 42 states with laws on the books detailing how much patients should pay for these records. (reuters.com)
  • Patients' copy fees might reach as high as $218.70 for 150 pages of records in Minnesota, or $687.70 for 500 pages, researchers estimated. (reuters.com)
  • Krumholz is the founder of Hugo, a software platform designed to help patients easily and freely obtain and share copies of their medical records. (reuters.com)
  • When fees are too steep, patients should discuss it with their doctor directly, said Dr. Bryan Lee, an ophthalmologist at Stanford University and Altos Eye Physicians in Los Altos, California. (reuters.com)
  • The capitation fees was based on the number of patients the GP had on his list. (wikipedia.org)
  • The law bans the medical provider from charging patients to supplement their income from Medicare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Except in medical emergency situations, patients need a referral from the PCP in order to see a specialist or other doctor, and the gatekeeper cannot authorize that referral unless the HMO guidelines deem it necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • free
  • Capitan Carlos Palanca Tanchueco, with wealthy Chinese businessmen Chan Guan and Mariano Velasco did a fund-raising in 1891 for the construction of a medical clinic where treatment was free of charge. (wikipedia.org)
  • These "hibakusha" health books were free from medical fees, and Namie asked the government to set up a similar program for the people in Namie. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though treatment was not free, unlike NHS Scotland which succeeded it, fees were set at minimal levels and people could still get treated even if they were unable to pay. (wikipedia.org)
  • higher
  • Higher costs are a higher barrier for people to get their own information," Krumholz told Reuters Health by email. (reuters.com)
  • How are Irish farmers/ businesses so supposed to compete when professional fees are so much higher here? (irisheconomy.ie)
  • Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsány stated that the fees would be abolished on 1 April 2008 following the referendum, but that the government had no funds available to replace the income lost for the higher educations institutions and health institutions due to the abolishment of the fees. (wikipedia.org)
  • Do you agree that students in state-subsidised higher education should be exempt from tuition fees? (wikipedia.org)
  • government
  • The Medical Products Agency (Swedish: Läkemedelsverket) is the government agency in Sweden responsible for regulation and surveillance of the development, manufacturing and sale of medicinal drugs, medical devices and cosmetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government of Vietnam says as many as 3 million people have suffered illnesses because of Agent Orange. (wikipedia.org)
  • Australia prepared the frigate HMAS Sydney, and heavy landing ship HMAS Tobruk to carry helicopters, Australian Army engineers and medical teams to Japan if this was requested by the Japanese Government. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite
  • Despite a variety of sources and a reasonable amount of statistics, Nick Eberstadt's article on China does more to obscure than deal with the problem of China and the lives of its people. (nybooks.com)
  • Despite being the chief medical social worker in her department, Buben actually did not have a degree in social work until she decided to do so in the 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • receive medical
  • Many advocates of VSED say it is painless, however their claim is based on the requirement that individuals receive medical supervision including pain and symptom control as they dehydrate to death… Without powerful sedatives and other palliative measures (and, sometimes even with such measures), dehydration deaths have been described as horrific. (nationalreview.com)
  • cover
  • Employer Responsibility - If employers with at least 50 full-time employees don't offer affordable health insurance and their employees use tax credits to pay for insurance through an exchange, employers must pay a fee to help cover the cost of the credits. (aarpmedicareplans.com)
  • Moreover, the fund will cover a part of fee for testing and other medical service. (vietreader.com)
  • Many political parties support extending the availability of the Medical Card to eventually cover everyone resident in Ireland - they currently cover 31.9% of the population. (wikipedia.org)
  • service
  • The Highlands and Islands Medical Service (HIMS) provided state funded healthcare to a population covering half of Scotland's landmass from its launch in 1913 until the creation of Scotland's National Health Service (NHS) in 1948. (wikipedia.org)
  • The service came into being as a direct result of the publication of the Report of the Highlands and Islands Medical Service Committee or "Dewar Report" in 1912. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1933 first Air ambulance journey from Islay on a Midland Scottish Air Ferries flight to Glasgow 1934 Consultant surgeons established in Shetland, Orkney, Caithness & Lewis 1935 Consultant Physician appointed in Inverness 1936 Air ambulance service to Western Isles established 1936 Cathcart Report: "This service has revolutionised medical provision in the Highlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • card
  • That's why you should always carry a medical card in your wallet behind the driver's license (paramedics will always check there). (wisebread.com)
  • The only medical conditions carrying automatic entitlement to a Card are having thalidomide syndrome, having a surgical symphysiotomy, and children with cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • For persons over 70 years who are not entitled to a medical card or GP visit card they instead receive an annual cash grant of €400 up to a certain income. (wikipedia.org)
  • cannot
  • Because the hygiene is at minimum levels during these moments, the less fortunate people are forced to cook with and ingest these contaminated waters because they cannot afford to treat it. (hubpages.com)
  • Right now there is a super risk of the response effort being choked off, being restricted, because we simply cannot get enough seats on enough airplanes to get people in and out, and rotating, to get goods and supplies in and out and rotating," Aylward said. (afro.com)
  • support
  • After that he (abled person) has to pay rent and that rent comes back to the disabled (association) which we then use to take our friends to hospital, support those in school and some members within the community. (voanews.com)
  • The association plans to expand its operations and support disabled people throughout Zambia - something that requires additional resources. (voanews.com)
  • With the world's support, medical workers hope to take "the heat out of this outbreak" within three months, Aylward said. (afro.com)
  • years
  • She has been a member of the association for several years and explains that the association has assisted a lot of disabled people around the North-Western area. (voanews.com)
  • Suicide is defined as "the act or an instance of taking one's own life voluntarily and intentionally especially by a person of years of discretion and of sound mind. (nationalreview.com)
  • The three years between 1959 and 1962 were known as the "Three Bitter Years," the Three Years of Natural Disasters (although this name is now rarely used in China), and the Great Leap Famine, as the Chinese people suffered from extreme shortages of food. (wikipedia.org)
  • long
  • Before long, more disabled persons around the Northwest region expressed interest in joining the group. (voanews.com)
  • The WHO has supported the quarantine of sick people, and said cordoning off entire neighborhoods can be useful, as long as civil rights are respected. (afro.com)
  • products
  • The Swedish Medical Products Agency is one of the leading regulatory authorities in the EU. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Innovation Office is open to all innovators in academia and industry seeking advice and further knowledge about the European market for medical products. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • The outbreak has now killed at least 1,552 people among 3,069 reported cases in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria, and the real caseload in urban areas could be two to four timeshigher. (afro.com)
  • problems
  • Do the governments of those two nations, blessed with some amount of foreign aid and a manufacturing/industrial sector that brings in seemingly significant amounts of foreign capital, face the same problems in feeding and caring for their people as the rulers of the People's Republic? (nybooks.com)
  • work
  • She switched her major to Hygiene, a department where people were trained as somewhat nurse and somewhat social work trainees. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legitimate work-at-home opportunities do exist, and many people do their jobs in the comfort of their own homes, but anyone seeking such an employment opportunity should be wary of accepting a home employment offer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Signs of a work-at-home scam versus a legitimate job may include: Payment of fee is required prior to starting employment. (wikipedia.org)