• oysters
  • Ama are famous for pearl diving, but originally they dived for food like seaweed, shellfish, lobsters, octopus, and sea urchins - and oysters which sometimes have pearls. (wikipedia.org)
  • Collecting pearls from wild mollusks Pearl hunting is the act of recovering pearls from wild mollusks, usually oysters or mussels, in the sea or fresh water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the beginning of the 20th century, the only means of obtaining pearls was by manually gathering very large numbers of pearl oysters or mussels from the ocean floor or lake or river bottom. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In order to find enough pearl oysters, free-divers were often forced to descend to depths of over 100 feet on a single breath, exposing them to the dangers of hostile creatures, waves, eye damage, and drowning, often as a result of shallow water blackout on resurfacing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the difficulty of diving and the unpredictable nature of natural pearl growth in pearl oysters, pearls of the time were extremely rare and of varying quality. (wikipedia.org)
  • The natural pearls found from harvested oysters were a rare bonus for the divers. (wikipedia.org)
  • was forced to strictly regulate the harvest to prevent the oysters from becoming extinct,[citation needed] and the Mexican government banned all pearl harvesting from 1942 to 1963. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Asia, some pearl oysters could be found on shoals at a depth of 5-7 feet (1.325-2 meters) from the surface, but more often divers had to go 40 feet (12 meters) or even up to 125 feet (40 meters) deep to find enough pearl oysters, and these deep dives were extremely hazardous to the divers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Caribbean
  • During the first half of the sixteenth century, Spaniards discovered the vast and luscious pearl oyster beds that existed on the Caribbean coast of Venezuela, particularly in the vicinity of Margarita Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • As she spends time with a Psychiatrist, she drifts in and out of reality and assumes characters from both The Tale of Genji and Ama while a Prosecutor and the Chief of Police work to determine her guilt. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ama were known for their coarse manners, and their work coarsened their skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Utamaro and others played with these contrasts, portraying ama in elegant, resting poses as they often did with geisha, but nude and unkempt in their work environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • sexually
  • The ama were perceived as less feminine, but socially and sexually free. (wikipedia.org)
  • While Utamaro's supple, enrgetic, and vigorously healthy ama come across in a way erotic, his depictions of them differ from his often sexually explicit shunga. (wikipedia.org)
  • oyster
  • However, due to over-exploitation of both indigenous labor and the oyster beds, the Spanish pearl economy soon plummeted. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • A portrait of Pearl S. Buck taken during the 1920s, during the time she lived in Nanking. (npr.org)
  • I'm excited today to talk about the geriatric pharmacotherapy pearls, it's a great time to talk in the day because it's after lunch, we've actually all had a snack and it was cookies, no milk, but we should all be relaxed and now I get kind of the exciting time to try to reengage the audience. (upmcphysicianresources.com)
  • Japanese
  • wish-fulfilling jewel" in Japanese Buddhism, magic jewels of Nāga kings in Hindu mythology, and the pearl associations of Chinese dragons in Chinese mythology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some Japanese people believe that the majority of ama are women because of how their bodies differ from men: The fat on a female body is distributed differently from on men. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Edgar, the oldest, ten years of age when Pearl was born, stayed long enough to teach her to walk, but a year or two later he was gone too (sent back to be educated in the United States, he would be a young man of twenty before his sister saw him again). (npr.org)
  • known
  • This island is known as the birthplace of cultured pearl Aquaculture and it belongs to Mikimoto Pearl Museum Co., Ltd. (株式会社ミキモト真珠島, Kabushiki-Gaisha-Mikimoto-Shinju-Jima). (wikipedia.org)
  • Island
  • Mikimoto developed the island as a center for pearl production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later in 1956, she was given the starring role in Revenge of the Pearl Queen (女真珠王の復讐, Onna Shinjū Ō no Fukushū), a melodramatic thriller set on an isolated island about a woman seeking revenge for her dead lover. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Assessing the quality of pearls involves the use of various tools and methods, which are mainly visual and often quite subjective. (mdpi.com)
  • create
  • Also hailed as the 'R&G King' by Complex Mag, DaVinChe worked with Katie Pearl, and Sadie Ama, and Shola Ama to create the R&G sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • nature
  • Due to the opaque nature of pearls, spectroscopy measurements were performed using the Diffuse Reflectance UV-Visible spectroscopy technique. (mdpi.com)
  • Museum
  • J.C. Hoel, at AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame J.C. Hoel at Find a Grave J.C. "Pappy" Hoel, Sturgis Museum and Hall of Fame. (wikipedia.org)
  • order
  • The spectra were acquired at two different locations on each pearl sample in order to assess surface homogeneity. (mdpi.com)
  • More than a ton were searched in order to find at least 3-4 quality pearls. (wikipedia.org)
  • thousands
  • Ama once numbered many thousands, but by the beginning of the 21st century only about a thousand remained. (wikipedia.org)
  • shows
  • The results of this study shows that the developed UV-Vis spectroscopy-ANN method could be used as a more objective method of assessing pearl quality (grading) and may become a valuable tool for the pearl grading industry. (mdpi.com)
  • look
  • Another ama watches seated on a rock with an ashamed look, her right hand held to her mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • woman
  • In Pearl Buck in China, Hilary Spurling makes a compelling case for a reappraisal of Buck's fiction - transforming her from dreary "lady author" into woman warrior. (npr.org)
  • stories
  • 2017. https://news.wharton.upenn.edu/feature-stories/2012/10/in-memoriam-paul-e-green/ https://www.ama.org/publications/JournalOfMarketingResearch/Pages/WilliamFO%27DellAward.aspx https://www.ama.org/publications/JournalOfMarketingResearch/Pages/JMRPreviousEditors.aspx http://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/5888/volumes/v09/NA-09/ Pearl, Robert, and Seymour Sudman. (wikipedia.org)