• reaction
  • Both pathways start from the activation of sulfate by reaction with ATP to form adenylyl sulfate (APS). (genome.jp)
  • This reaction is catalyzed by mercury(II) salts: C2H2 + Hg2+ + H2O → CH3CHO + Hg The mechanism involves the intermediacy of vinyl alcohol, which tautomerizes to acetaldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a Strecker reaction, acetaldehyde condenses with cyanide and ammonia to give, after hydrolysis, the amino acid alanine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In enzymology, a deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase (EC 4.1.2.4) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction 2-deoxy-D-ribose 5-phosphate ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate + acetaldehyde Hence, this enzyme has one substrate, 2-deoxy-D-ribose 5-phosphate, and two products, D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and acetaldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • compound
  • Acetaldehyde is a highly reactive compound that causes various forms of damage to DNA, including DNA adducts, single- and/or double-strand breaks (DSBs), point mutations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), and DNA-DNA cross-links. (mdpi.com)
  • Acetaldehyde (systematic name ethanal) is an organic chemical compound with the formula CH3CHO, sometimes abbreviated by chemists as MeCHO (Me = methyl). (wikipedia.org)
  • alcohol consumption
  • Alcohol consumption increases blood and salivary acetaldehyde levels, especially in individuals with ALDH2 polymorphisms, which are highly associated with the risk of squamous cell carcinomas in the upper aerodigestive tract. (mdpi.com)
  • consumption
  • Based on extensive epidemiological evidence, the International Agency for Research on Cancer defined acetaldehyde associated with the consumption of alcoholic beverages as a "group 1 carcinogen" (definite carcinogen) for the esophagus and/or head and neck. (mdpi.com)
  • Acetaldehyde, the first by-product of ethanol, is between 10 and 30 times more toxic than alcohol itself and can remain at an elevated plateau for many hours after initial ethanol consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patients show higher blood levels of acetaldehyde, and become violently ill upon consumption of even small amounts of alcohol. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • The increased exposure to acetaldehyde in individuals with the catalytically inactive form may also confer greater susceptibility to many types of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gene
  • Characterization of the 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate aldolase gene and operon structure of the protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathway genes in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. (genome.jp)
  • bacterial
  • In the dissimilatory pathway, which is restricted to obligatory anaerobic bacterial and archaeal lineages, sulfate (or sulfur) is the terminal electron acceptor of the respiratory chain producing large quantities of inorganic sulfide. (genome.jp)
  • produces
  • The hydroformylation of methanol with catalysts like cobalt, nickel, or iron salts also produces acetaldehyde, although this process is of no industrial importance. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolize
  • Since ALDH2 assembles and functions as a tetramer and requires all four of its components to be active in order to metabolize acetaldehyde, heterozygotes have very little ALDH2 activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Name
  • IUPAC name: ethenol): CH3CH=O ⇌ CH2=CHOH ∆H298,g = +42.7 kJ/mol The equilibrium constant is 6×10−7 at room temperature, thus that the relative amount of the enol form in a sample of acetaldehyde is very small. (wikipedia.org)
  • The systematic name of this enzyme class is 2-deoxy-D-ribose-5-phosphate acetaldehyde-lyase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-forming). (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • The metabolized acetaldehyde in the blood, which is six times higher than in individuals without the mutation, has shown to be a carcinogen in lab animals. (wikipedia.org)