• vaccines
  • In a June 22 ruling, the Supreme Court of Appeals' 2nd Civil Chamber said parental permission was not necessary for certain types of vaccines which were in a child's "best interest" to receive. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • The Supreme Court of Appeals also gave an exemplary ruling on May 4, in which it said parental permission did not need to be sought for significant vaccines, recalling articles in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Turkish Civil Code which highlights the best interests of a child. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • The state of California has just passed bill AB499, which will permit minor children as young as 12 years old to be vaccinated with sexually transmitted disease vaccines like Gardasil without parental knowledge or parental consent. (abovetopsecret.com)
  • voluntary
  • age 17 with parental consent) Israel - 17 (voluntary), 18 (compulsory for Jews and Druze only) Italy - 18 (voluntary) Jamaica - 17 (voluntary) Japan - 18 (voluntary) Jordan - 17 (voluntary) Kazakhstan - 15 (military cadets), 18 (compulsory) Kenya - 18 (voluntary). (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • Turkey's Constitutional Court has ruled that parental consent is necessary for the vaccination of babies and children, handing down a contrasting ruling to the country's Supreme Court of Appeals. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • cases
  • The corporal integrity of the individual shall not be violated except under medical necessity and in cases prescribed by law and shall not be subjected to scientific or medical experiments without their consent," the article states. (hurriyetdailynews.com)
  • notification
  • The Bells worked with the Feminist Majority Foundation, which credited them with helping to turn public opinion against a parental-notification law in Oregon. (wikipedia.org)
  • bill
  • Joining Whitmire in defending the bill were conservative organizations that argued it restores parental rights and lines of communication within families. (blueridgenow.com)
  • despite
  • The Leicester Mercury was entitled to include a teenage school girl's online comments about a "controversial" school uniform policy in its report, despite not having the consent of her guardians. (pressgazette.co.uk)
  • seek
  • It added that the complainants step-daughter had not been photographed or interviewed and that as a result it was "not under an obligation to seek parental consent" before naming her. (pressgazette.co.uk)