• ticks
  • The parasitic diseases discussed elsewhere in this issue of the Scientific and Technical Review are not the only ones to make use of biological vectors (such as mosquitoes or ticks) or mechanical vectors (such as horse flies or Stomoxys flies). (oie.int)
  • The natural environmental controls that used to keep the tick populations in check are disappearing, and warmer and wetter climates are allowing the ticks to breed and grow at an alarming rate, resulting in an increase in Lyme disease, both in existing areas and in areas where it has not been seen before. (wikipedia.org)
  • As part of his work for the new Stock Institute, in 1894 Pound proved that cattle ticks transmitted Redwater Disease (Bacillary Hemoglobinuria), which was causing heavy losses in Queensland cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • He continued research work on the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them. (wikipedia.org)
  • larvae
  • The disease (called Toxocariasis) caused by migrating T. canis larvae (toxocariasis) results in two syndromes: visceralis larva migrans and ocularis larva migrans. (wikipedia.org)
  • L2 larvae may also be ingested by a variety of animals like mice or rabbits, where they stay in a dormant stage inside the animals' tissue until the intermediate host has been eaten by a dog, where subsequent development is confined to the gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Life-cycle is a complete metamorphosis with larvae that are non-parasitic, living in environments such as pools of water, soil, streams. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme
  • It was not until the 1970s that the association of these bacteria with what came to be known as Lyme disease was discovered. (usda.gov)
  • The black legged tick, a carrier of Lyme disease, when not feeding, spends its time burrowed in soil absorbing moisture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Africa
  • The African Small Companion Animal Network launches to raise the animal care standard in Africa. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • The project is designed to unite veterinarians on a professional level and raise the standard of care for animals across Africa . (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • The disease occurs regularly in some regions of sub-Saharan Africa with the population at risk being about 70 million in 36 countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trypanosoma brucei gambiense causes the diseases in west and central Africa, whereas Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense has a limited geographical range and is responsible for causing the disease in east and southern Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • veterinary
  • The world's second-largest continent is short on veterinary collaboration-a problem the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Foundation wants to fix. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Others include the association, the World Organization for Animal Health, the North American Veterinary Community, Vetstream, Morris Animal Foundation, Worldwide Veterinary Service, the University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy in Slovakia and the marketing firm Circa Healthcare. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • We have a real opportunity to help advance the veterinary profession across the continent and, in so doing, improve the lives of millions of animals and humans,' said foundation vice president Michael Day, BVMS, Ph.D., Dipl. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Longer term, it will help to create the sustainable infrastructure which is so important in supporting small animal veterinarians across the continent and driving up standards of veterinary care,' he said. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • The World Small Animal Veterinary Association is planning additional projects in September as part of the group's annual World Congress. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • This article provides an overview of parasitic flies from a veterinary perspective, with emphasis on the disease causing relationships between these flies and their host animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • The disease spreads from one animal to another by contact with infected feces or ingestion of infected tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genus Hammondia is transmitted by ingestion of cysts found in the tissue of grazing animals and rodents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genus Besnoitia infects cats that ingest cysts in the tissue of rodents and opossums, but usually do not cause disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers
  • Centers for Disease Control. (wikipedia.org)
  • NAMRU-3 collaborators include the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • This is a vascular disease that is commonly triggered by the involvement of change in temperature, which leads to syndromes including (first and second degree) burning pain, increased temperature, erythema and swelling, of mainly the hands and feet that are affected. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medieval times, "humble pie" (originally, "Umble pie") made from animal innards (especially deer) was a peasant food and is the source of the commonly used idiom "eating humble pie", although it has lost its original meaning as meat pies made from offal are no longer referred to by this name. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amphistomiasis or paramphistomiasis (alternatively spelled amphistomosis or paramphistomosis) is a parasitic disease of livestock animals, more commonly of cattle and sheep, and humans caused by immature helminthic flatworms belonging to the order Echinostomida. (wikipedia.org)
  • Via these collaborations with partner nations, the NAMRU gets to conduct research on diseases that threaten troops on deployment but are not commonly seen in the US, and to get advanced notice of impending pandemics such as avian influenza that might affect military operational readiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • secondly, parasitic diseases caused by vector-borne protists, foremost of which is bovine besnoitiosis (or anasarca of cattle), which has recently spread through Europe by a dual mode of transmission (direct and by vector). (oie.int)
  • vaccines
  • The Station was the first purpose-built, farm-based facility of Australia's first Stock Institute and its work was primarily to research and control diseases in livestock, develop vaccines and improve animal health and production. (wikipedia.org)
  • The modern mission of the NAMRUs is threefold: To investigate prophylactic agents such as vaccines and pharmaceuticals against tropical infectious diseases which cause severe mortality or morbidity to the US military member in the deployed environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • cysts
  • The cysts of the Echinococcus granulosus tapeworm were also well known in ancient cultures mainly because of their presence in slaughtered and sacrificed animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • In most adults it does not cause serious illness, but it can cause blindness and mental retardation in congenitally infected children and devastating disease in immunocompromised individuals. (usda.gov)
  • Sarcocystis may cause disease in dogs and cats. (wikipedia.org)
  • El Nino is an extreme weather pattern that is often responsible for increased precipitation, resulting in increased flooding, creating a more promising breeding ground for a plethora of vectors that both carry and cause infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • This disease is the leading cause of acquired epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • however, adults often reside in the pulmonary arterial system (lung arteries), as well as the heart, and a major effect on the health for the animal is a manifestation of damage to the lung vessels and tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • The major parasitic disease which has been documented in early records is dracunculiasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • There are chick feed mixes that contain a coccidiostat to manage exposure levels and control disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amphistomiasis is considered a neglected tropical disease, with no prescription drug for treatment and control. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the war, the U.S. Navy was invited by the Egyptian Government to study, prevent, and control epidemic diseases and diseases endemic in subtropical areas and NAMRU-3 was formally established by the Secretary of the Navy in the same buildings formerly occupied by the Typhus commission in 1946. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • While small animal veterinarians work hard, their numbers are few [and] they are geographically isolated and often held back by a lack of training and support,' said Gabriel Varga, DVM, the foundation's president and director of North European business operations for Zoetis Inc . (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Health
  • The Florham Park, N.J., animal health company is among the effort's sponsors. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • A good example of the impact of global warming on health can be seen in the disease Erythromelalgia. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the World Health Organization they created an "unprecedented" drug donation program, with the intention of wiping out the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The host nation benefits by getting access to state of the art treatments and protection against diseases endemic to their country and a more robust public health infrastructure and better trained microbiology and physician population. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Diagnosis basically relies on a combination of postmortem analyses, clinical signs displayed by the animals, and response to drenching. (wikipedia.org)
  • various
  • Pound's activities also included obtaining pathological specimens of various manifestations of diseases in stock and other domesticated animals, and items sent in by stock owners were added to the museum's collection. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • Dirofilaria immitis, the heartworm or dog heartworm, is a parasitic roundworm that is spread from host to host through the bites of mosquitoes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heartworms go throughout several life stages before they become adults infecting the pulmonary artery of the host animal. (wikipedia.org)
  • pose
  • The bacterium Pasteurella multocida and its genus can pose a risk of severe diseases in high-risk groups such as the elderly, transplant recipients, cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. (wikipedia.org)