• Infection
  • Lyme disease is caused by infection with the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. (usda.gov)
  • The Animal Production Unit has started the search of possible SNP sites in both genes, with the main objective of obtaining markers to be used as tool in breeding strategies to obtain populations of small ruminants that are more tolerant to helminth infection. (iaea.org)
  • The diseases covered are those on Australia's National List of Reportable Diseases of Aquatic Animals , excluding European catfish virus/European sheatfish virus and Infection with salmonid alphavirus. (agriculture.gov.au)
  • Heartworm infection may result in serious disease for the host, with death typically as the result of congestive heart failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • A normal immune system will suppress the infection but the tissue cysts will persist in that animal or human for years or for life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pathogens can also infect people when there is contact with animal saliva, urine and other body fluids or secretions, When fecal material is unintentionally ingested, infection can occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally the focus of study is "orphan" illnesses with little or no investment by major pharmaceutical companies and include parasitic infection such as malaria and leishmaniasis, viral diseases such as dengue fever and other arboviruses, and bacterial illnesses like traveler's diarrhea (ETEC, campylobacter, shigella). (wikipedia.org)
  • Fasciolosis (also known as fascioliasis, fasciolasis, distomatosis and liver rot) is a parasitic worm infection caused by the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica as well as by Fasciola gigantica. (wikipedia.org)
  • whereas R. echinobothrida is highly pathogenic, and causes nodular tapeworm disease under heavy infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • zoonotic diseases
  • Therefore, zoonotic diseases, those transmitted between animals and humans, represent a very real concern, and not only in the developing world 1 . (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Zoonotic diseases are likely to increase in prevalence as a result not only of the increasingly close association with animals, but also increased global travel, and the ongoing trade in exotic animals, to mention just a few examples 1 . (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Anton Pijpers, professor of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Utrecht, said: "Animal health is also about human health and the linkage between the two is fundamental, whether we are talking about zoonotic diseases that can be passed between animals and people or chronic disease that affect people and animals alike. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Alejandro Bernal, Executive Vice President and Area President, Europe, Africa and Middle East at Zoetis and Chairman of IFAH-Europe, the organisation representing manufacturers of veterinary medicines, vaccines and other animal health products in Europe, explained: "Detecting and controlling disease in animals should not only occur after human cases, which is too often the case, it should start when outbreaks of zoonotic diseases are first seen in animals. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Organisations such as IFAH Europe, EFPIA, WHO, FAO and OIE need to work together with national governments to capture the direct and indirect impacts of zoonotic diseases - and to publish the associated costs, which would over time lead to more focus on zoonotic disease prevention and control rather than treatment once humans are affected. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Other than T. gondii, the infectious organisms are canine and feline-specific and are not contagious to humans, unlike the zoonotic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • infect
  • Fleas and ticks can carry pathogenic organisms that infect a person with Lyme disease, tick borne encephalitis, and Rocky mountain spotted fever Statistics generated by the state of Ohio document that Cat bites are about 20% of all animal bites per year. (wikipedia.org)
  • genus
  • Genus Besnoitia infects cats that ingest cysts in the tissue of rodents and opossums, but usually do not cause disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacterium Pasteurella multocida and its genus can pose a risk of severe diseases in high-risk groups such as the elderly, transplant recipients, cancer patients and immunocompromised individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lyme
  • It was not until the 1970s that the association of these bacteria with what came to be known as Lyme disease was discovered. (usda.gov)
  • Due to their role in transmitting Lyme disease, ixodid ticks, particularly the North American I. scapularis, have been studied using geographic information systems to develop predictive models for ideal tick habitats. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • Additionally, the Community Health Aide Program (CHAP) provides village-based primary health care in 47 village clinics in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, including acute, chronic and emergency care, preventative services, and health promotion disease prevention activities to individuals, families, and their communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • hosts
  • The cysts and eggs of endoparasites may be found in feces which aids in the detection of the parasite in the human host while also providing the means for the parasitic species to exit the current host and enter other hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • sheep
  • In addition, members of the Animal Production Unit and Section are collaborating with researchers from the United States Department of Agriculture, the International Livestock Research Institute and the University of San Paulo on a genome scan of a cross between Dorper and Red Massai sheep to develop genetic markers for helminth resistance. (iaea.org)
  • Studies of the genetics of sheep have shown that it is possible to identify whether sheep are resistant or susceptible to scrapie, an incurable degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system of small ruminants. (iaea.org)
  • ticks
  • The parasitic diseases discussed elsewhere in this issue of the Scientific and Technical Review are not the only ones to make use of biological vectors (such as mosquitoes or ticks) or mechanical vectors (such as horse flies or Stomoxys flies). (oie.int)
  • As part of his work for the new Stock Institute, in 1894 Pound proved that cattle ticks transmitted Redwater Disease (Bacillary Hemoglobinuria), which was causing heavy losses in Queensland cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • He continued research work on the eradication of cattle ticks and the diseases caused by them. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • The major parasitic disease which has been documented in early records is dracunculiasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, adults often reside in the pulmonary arterial system (lung arteries), as well as the heart, and a major effect on the health for the animal is a manifestation of damage to the lung vessels and tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • In the chronic state the disease causes inflammation of the bile ducts, gall bladder and may cause gall stones as well as fibrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • cattle
  • secondly, parasitic diseases caused by vector-borne protists, foremost of which is bovine besnoitiosis (or anasarca of cattle), which has recently spread through Europe by a dual mode of transmission (direct and by vector). (oie.int)
  • common
  • Magda Chlebus, director of Science Policy at the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) said: "Human, animal and environmental health face many common or related challenges. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Several subtypes of Trichinella can cause disease with T. spiralis being the most common. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the disease occurs in the tropics it is less common there. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Much research in Animal Genetics is currently focused on the search of genetic markers for economically important traits, with the aim of providing new tools for breeding programmes. (iaea.org)
  • Research
  • Animal Research Institute Buildings is a heritage-listed set of research station buildings at 681 Fairfield Road, Yeerongpilly, City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also known as Stock Experiment Station (1909-1932) and Animal Research Station (1932-1953). (wikipedia.org)
  • Via these collaborations with partner nations, the NAMRU gets to conduct research on diseases that threaten troops on deployment but are not commonly seen in the US, and to get advanced notice of impending pandemics such as avian influenza that might affect military operational readiness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its mission is to provide excellence in teaching, research, animal patient consulting and care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • NAMRU-3 collaborators include the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (wikipedia.org)
  • various
  • Pound's activities also included obtaining pathological specimens of various manifestations of diseases in stock and other domesticated animals, and items sent in by stock owners were added to the museum's collection. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • There are chick feed mixes that contain a coccidiostat to manage exposure levels and control disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the war, the U.S. Navy was invited by the Egyptian Government to study, prevent, and control epidemic diseases and diseases endemic in subtropical areas and NAMRU-3 was formally established by the Secretary of the Navy in the same buildings formerly occupied by the Typhus commission in 1946. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stages
  • Heartworms go throughout several life stages before they become adults infecting the pulmonary artery of the host animal. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • The most documented by far was Guinea worm disease mainly because the grown female worm emerges from the skin which causes considerable irritation and which cannot really be ignored. (wikipedia.org)
  • spread
  • The Yeerongpilly site was more suitable than other sites considered as it was bounded on the north by the river, on the south by the railway line, leaving only narrow frontages on the east and west to adjoining land and public roads, thereby reducing the danger that disease could spread. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cultivated plants do not spread the disease in the same capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • host
  • The host nation benefits by getting access to state of the art treatments and protection against diseases endemic to their country and a more robust public health infrastructure and better trained microbiology and physician population. (wikipedia.org)
  • develop
  • The Animal Genetics group at Seibersdorf is trying to develop tools to make this possible. (iaea.org)