• lumbar
  • Most common causes include iatrogenic lumbar punctures, burst fractures resulting in posterior migration of fragments of the vertebral body, severe disc herniations, spinal anaesthesia involving trauma from catheters and high local anaesthetic concentrations around the cauda equina, penetrating trauma such as knife wounds or ballistic trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • CES can be caused by lumbar spinal stenosis, which is when the diameter of the spinal canal narrows. (wikipedia.org)
  • The triad is paraplegia with lumbar loss of pain sensation and presence of perineal altered sensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurogenic claudication is caused by compression of the cauda equine in a narrow lumbar spinal canal. (shahzadshams.com)
  • pulmonary
  • in the 22 recurrent ONM patients: pulmonary tuberculosis (3), neurocysticercosis (1), polyarteritis nodosa (1), antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (1), antiphospholipid antibody primary syndrome (1), diabetes mellitus (1), hypothyroidism (1), and amenorrhea-galactorrhea (4). (bmj.com)
  • infection
  • Spinal tuberculosis is the most common infection affecting the skeletal system in our country, and if incorrectly treated, can have devastating and permanent sequelae. (jcorth.com)
  • The emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis and HIV has turned this age old infection into a deadly and terrifying disease. (jcorth.com)
  • Poliomyelitis, or gray matter myelitis, is usually caused by infection of anterior horn of the spinal cord by the enteroviruses (polioviruses, enteroviruses (EV) 70 and 71, echoviruses, coxsackieviruses A and B) and the flaviviruses (West Nile, Japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Traumatic
  • Spinal cord injury can be traumatic or nontraumatic, and can be classified into three types based on cause: mechanical forces, toxic, and ischemic (from lack of blood flow). (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • The clinician should also maintain a high degree of suspicion in immunocompromised patients, especially HIV infections, and should also be wary of patients with a history of tuberculosis, or those who have come in contact with tuberculosis patients.Unfortunately, in our country, many patients are diagnosed late and present with complications that may require surgical intervention. (jcorth.com)
  • acute
  • stage ii: Neurological signs - hemiplegia, depressed level of the child has acute paraplegia, indicating spinal cord compression from the sitting or supine to an ipsilateral compressive optic neuropathy. (cide.edu)
  • posterior
  • In this case, I would have likely performed a posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation from C7 to T6 with a lateral extracavitary resection of T2 and T3 and anterior reconstruction using a titanium cage filled with iliac crest bone graft. (spineuniverse.com)
  • absent
  • Sciatica-type pain on one side or both sides, although pain may be wholly absent Weakness of the muscles of the lower legs (often paraplegia) Achilles (ankle) reflex absent on both sides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flaccid paraplegia with absent reflexes is associated with radicular sensory loss and an atonic bladder. (shahzadshams.com)
  • weakness
  • KeywordsIntra-medullary tuberculoma Spinal tuberculoma Muscle weakness Electronic supplementary materialThe online version of this article doi:10.1186-1752-1947-6-388 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. (duhnnae.com)
  • neurologic
  • Pott's disease is a severe illness, and there are many different factors that can affect neurologic recovery after spinal cord damage and surgery. (zocdoc.com)
  • inflammation
  • Myelitis is inflammation of the spinal cord which can disrupt the normal responses from the brain to the rest of the body, and from the rest of the body to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • Inability to walk, with this unusual sensory examination completes a triad of signs and usually represents spinal tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI), published by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), is widely used to document sensory and motor impairments following SCI. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • Immediate surgery is the answer and it involves removing the cord compressing pathology and if massive damge of vertebra are involved then spinal fixation with titanium screws and plates or cage fixation is also required in few cases. (shahzadshams.com)
  • disease
  • Paraplegia is the loss of power in the lower extremities usually due to spinal cord (spastic variety) or peripheral nerve and muscle disease (flaccid type) amputee is a person who has had part or the whole of a limb removed this could be due to a variety of causes from vascular disease trauma or cancer . (healthtap.com)
  • In the majority of cases, paraplegia results from disease or injury of the spinal cord that causes interference with nerve paths connecting the brain and the muscles. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Pott's disease results from haematogenous spread of tuberculosis from other sites, often the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gull is remembered for a number of significant contributions to medical science, including advancing the understanding of myxoedema, Bright's disease, paraplegia and anorexia nervosa (for which he first established the name). (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • The area of skin innervated by a specific spinal nerve is called a dermatome, and the group of muscles innervated by a single spinal nerve is called a myotome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain
  • In the case of myelitis, not only is the immune system dysfunctional, but the dysfunction also crosses this protective blood brain barrier to affect the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)