• pathogen
  • Nipah virus was first identified as the pathogen responsible for outbreaks of encephalitis in Malaysia and Singapore from October 1998 to June 1999 ( 1 - 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The pathogen-containing particles, also called Flügge droplets (after Carl Flügge), are 0,1-2 mm in diameter, and are reduced by evaporation to droplet nuclei - small (smaller than 100 μ in diameter), dry particles that can remain airborne for long periods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bluetongue virus is an economically important pathogen of cattle and sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccines
  • This is one reason why it is difficult to make effective vaccines to prevent diseases caused by RNA viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • WSAVA also prefers serological testing over unnecessary boosters or re-vaccination doses of core vaccines after the initial 12-month booster that follows the puppy series of modified live virus [MLV] vaccines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibody tests can be used to demonstrate the DOI after vaccination with core vaccines, though not for non-core vaccines (such as parainfluenza). (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • 1 , 2 It affects boys more than girls (1.4:1) and young children between 6 months and 3 years of age more commonly than younger infants, older children and adolescents. (cmaj.ca)
  • Members of this group include the rotaviruses, renowned globally as the most common cause of gastroenteritis in young children, and picobirnaviruses, renowned worldwide as the most commonly occurring virus in fecal samples of both humans and animals with or without signs of diarrhea. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, Ajoene has been shown to have activity against the human dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum, the most common cause of tinea pedis, commonly known as Athlete's Foot. (wikipedia.org)
  • Newcastle
  • Goudarzi, Hossein 2016-12-21 00:00:00 Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is believed to be the cause of fatal poultry disease worldwide. (deepdyve.com)
  • The fusion (F) protein plays a key role in virus pathogenesis, and it is also used for Newcastle disease virus classification. (deepdyve.com)
  • also used for Newcastle disease virus classification. (deepdyve.com)
  • protein
  • Heterologous Expression and Isolation of Influenza A Virus Nuclear Export Protein NEP. (amedeo.com)
  • Cullin-4A is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CUL4A gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the region of the hepatitis C virus genome that encodes the core protein is highly conserved, because it contains an RNA structure involved in an internal ribosome entry site. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins
  • The pathogenicity of HPIVs is mutually dependent on the viruses having the correct accessory proteins which are able to elicit anti-interferon properties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Matrix proteins inside the envelope stabilise virus structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in determining, at atomic and subnanometeric levels, the structures of a number of key viral proteins and of the virion capsids of several dsRNA viruses, highlighting the significant parallels in the structure and replicative processes of many of these viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinct
  • The taxonomic division is broadly based on antigenic and genetic characteristics, forming four major serotypes or clades, which today are considered distinct viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • classification
  • The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) classifies RNA viruses as those that belong to Group III, Group IV or Group V of the Baltimore classification system of classifying viruses and does not consider viruses with DNA intermediates in their life cycle as RNA viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • 1 Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common clinical presentation of tuberculosis in adults, although extra-pulmonary disease is relatively more prevalent in children. (fda.gov)
  • nucleotides
  • A 5' trailer sequence, 50-161 nucleotides long Intergenomic regions between each gene, which are three nucleotides long for morbilliviruses, respiroviruses and henipaviruses, and variable length (1-56 nucleotides) for rubulaviruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transmission
  • This investigation provides evidence for person-to-person transmission of Nipah virus. (cdc.gov)
  • Transmission can also be indirect, via another organism, either a vector (e.g. a mosquito or fly) or an intermediate host (e.g. tapeworm in pigs can be transmitted to humans who ingest improperly cooked pork). (wikipedia.org)
  • In women with low detectable levels of the virus, the incidence of transmission is lower. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • 2 Annual patterns are also found, with about 50% more cases occurring in odd-numbered years, 4 correlating with prevalence of parainfluenza viruses in the community. (cmaj.ca)
  • based on a combination of data from several reports, we estimate death occurs in no more than 1 in 30 000 cases. (cmaj.ca)
  • In these cases, French investigators utilized improved techniques for recovering the virus from nasopharyngeal aspirates and from stool samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some human cases have been successfully treated with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1 out of 400 untreated cases, Lemierre's syndrome occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence
  • 17 Box 1 17 - 20 outlines the evidence used in this review. (cmaj.ca)
  • Evidence for a single promoter model was verified when viruses were exposed to UV light. (wikipedia.org)