• lenta
  • The remainder is equally divided between eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and deciduous species, including red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and black birch (Betula lenta). (osti.gov)
  • Tupelos Carya laciniosa, Shellbark Hickory Intermediate shade tolerant Acer rubrum, Red Maple Acer saccharinum, Silver Maple Betula lenta, Sweet Birch Castanea dentata, American Chestnut Celtis occidentalis, Hackberry Fraxinus americana, White Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Green Ash Fraxinus nigra, Black Ash Magnolia spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • syrup
  • Native Americans also boiled the sap of paper birch to make a syrup. (wikipedia.org)
  • Birch syrup is a savory mineral tasting syrup made from the sap of birch trees, and produced in much the same way as maple syrup. (wikipedia.org)
  • The flavor of birch syrup has a distinctive and mineral-rich caramel-like taste that is not unlike molasses or balsamic condiment or some types of soy, with a hint of spiciness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many people remark that while Birch syrup has the same sugar content of maple it is far more savory than sweet. (wikipedia.org)
  • Making birch syrup is more difficult than making maple syrup, requiring about 100-150 liters of sap to produce one liter of syrup (more than twice that needed for maple syrup). (wikipedia.org)
  • While maple sap may be boiled down without the use of reverse osmosis, birch syrup is difficult to produce this way: the sap is more temperature sensitive than is maple sap because fructose burns at a lower temperature than sucrose, the primary sugar in maple sap. (wikipedia.org)
  • This means that boiling birch sap to produce syrup can much more easily result in a scorched taste. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the higher sap-to-syrup ratio and difficulties in production, birch syrup is more expensive than maple syrup, up to five times the price. (wikipedia.org)
  • Margaret Baumann, Alaska Journal of Commerce, May 29, 2005 Petition to US Food and Drug Administration for establishment of Standard of Identity for birch syrup, including the Alaska Birch Syrupmakers' Association Best Practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • trunk
  • The common belief is that while birches have a lower trunk and root pressure than maples, pipeline or tubing method of sap collection used in large maple sugaring operations is not as useful in birch sap collection. (wikipedia.org)
  • native
  • It is strong wood, once used extensively in the manufacture of spools, shoe lasts, pegs, fuel, and in the manufacture of paper pulp, but also in by Native Americans in the construction of horns, canoes, snowshoe frames, and as coverings for the Long houses characteristic of the Iroquois and associated nations. (wikipedia.org)