• Asphyxia
  • Asphyxia or asphyxiation is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body that arises from abnormal breathing. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many circumstances that can induce asphyxia, all of which are characterized by an inability of an individual to acquire sufficient oxygen through breathing for an extended period of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • There has long been a debate over whether newborn infants with birth asphyxia should be resuscitated with 100% oxygen or normal air. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traditionally, newborn children have been resuscitated using mechanical ventilation with 100% oxygen, but there has since the 1980s increasingly been debated whether newborn infants with asphyxia should be resuscitated with 100% oxygen or normal air, and notably Ola Didrik Saugstad has been a major advocate of using normal air. (wikipedia.org)
  • NADPH
  • Activation of the mechanosome results in endothelial cell membrane depolarization that in turn leads to activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX2) to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). (physiology.org)
  • vivo
  • Intralipid (5mL/kg) provided five minutes before reperfusion delays the opening of mPTP in vivo rat models, making it a potential cardioprotective agent Lou et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Intrauterine hypoxia occurs when the fetus is deprived of an adequate supply of oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once reperfusion occurs, these cellular products are returned to the systemic circulation, and are exposed to other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterial
  • Previous studies revealed the ventilatory oscillation was associated with cyclic changes in arterial oxygen (PO2) and carbon dioxide (PCO2) tensions, and also associated with severely impaired exercise tolerance, a steep V E -V CO 2slope, and low peak O 2 consumption, both correlated with the worse severity of heart failure and adverse prognosis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • vascular
  • Recognizing this, surgeons frequently prophylacticly release (i.e., incise) fascia of arm and leg fascial compartments after repair of a proximal vascular injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • PKCδ has been implicated in depressing cardiac function and cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as promoting vascular smooth muscle contraction and decreasing perfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • harmful
  • This study tested the hypothesis that administration of recombinant human superoxide dismutase (h-SOD) at the time of reflow after a period of prolonged global ischemia would result in improved recovery of myocardial metabolism and function by preventing or reducing a potentially harmful component of reperfusion. (ahajournals.org)
  • Free Radical
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid and linoleic acid, are primary targets for free radical and singlet oxygen oxidations. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the presence of racemic 9-HODE and 9-EE-HODE mixtures reflects free radical oxidation of linoleic acid whereas the presence of racemic 10-hydroxy-8E,12Z-octadecadienoic acid and 12-hydroxy-9Z-13-E-octadecadienoic acid reflects singlet oxygen attack on linoleic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • transplantation
  • however, with lung transplantation overproduction of ROS and NO can cause oxidative injury and/or activation of proteins that drive inflammation and cell death. (physiology.org)
  • Understanding the key events in the mechanosignaling cascade has important lessons for the design of strategies or interventions that may reduce injury during storage of donor lungs with the goal to increase the availability of lungs suitable for donation and thus improving access to lung transplantation. (physiology.org)
  • Lung injury from I/R, termed primary graft dysfunction, is a major complication after lung transplantation and is considered as a major factor for transplant failure ( 27 , 36 , 64 , 65 , 102 ). (physiology.org)
  • accumulation
  • 2014) found that the cardioprotection aspect of Intralipid is initiated by the accumulation of acylcarnitines in the mitochondria and involves inhibition of the electron transport chain, an increase in ROS production during early (3 min) reperfusion, and activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway (RISK). (wikipedia.org)
  • With increased use of oxygen to produce more NO, less oxygen is available to react with eNOS to produce superoxides during an AMI, ultimately lowering the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). (wikipedia.org)
  • heart
  • Ventricular tachycardia represents a series of irregular heartbeats that may cause the heart to completely shut down resulting in cessation of oxygen flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • contractile
  • Despite this decrease in contractile function, left anterior descending artery flow (19.6 +/- 2.6 vs. 18.4 +/- 3.0 ml/min), myocardial blood flow and the transmural distribution of flow measured with microspheres, and regional myocardial oxygen consumption were unchanged. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Resuscitation
  • Research by Ola Didrik Saugstad and others led to new international guidelines on newborn resuscitation in 2010, recommending the use of normal air instead of 100% oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood
  • Blood was sampled from peripheral vein (before reperfusion) and directly from renal vein (5 and 15 minutes after reperfusion). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Smoking by expectant mothers causes a decrease in maternal nucleated red blood cells (NRBC), thereby reducing the amount of red blood cells available for oxygen transport. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compression of blood vessels may also lead to brain ischemia, by blocking the arteries that carry oxygen to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • normal
  • Under anoxic conditions, the predominant double-base lesion is a species in which C8 of guanine is linked to the 5-methyl group of an adjacent 3'-thymine (G[8,5- Me]T). Most of these oxygen-derived species are produced at a low level by normal aerobic metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 2010 ILCOR guidelines recommend the use of normal air rather than 100% oxygen. (wikipedia.org)