• methods
  • Methods Outcomes of 12 hackathons from 2012 to 2015 in India, Uganda and the USA were measured using emailed surveys. (bmj.com)
  • Methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature reporting results of studies in healthcare, nursing home or home care settings, was conducted. (diva-portal.org)
  • The hospital discharge destination will be noted, and functional assessment will be determined prior to hospital discharge by two validated methods previously used in this patient cohort (6-Minute Walk Distance and Short Performance Battery Test). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • METHODS: From July 2002 to July 2005, an observational study of postoperative outcomes was undertaken, in which 30-day and inhospital morbidity and mortality were assessed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Although the exact origins of the term "outcomes research" is unclear, the methods associated with outcomes research first gained wide attention in the 1850s as a result of the work of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War. (wikipedia.org)
  • The others imply that assessments should be based on scientific studies and methods, scientific criteria for quality of evidence and scientific standards for reporting of results, e.g. as described in EQUATOR Network. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "weight" (utility) values between 0 and 1 are usually determined by methods such as those proposed in the Journal of Health Economics: Time-trade-off (TTO): Respondents are asked to choose between remaining in a state of ill health for a period of time, or being restored to perfect health but having a shorter life expectancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current methods of healthcare payment may actually reward less-safe care, since some insurance companies will not pay for new practices to reduce errors, while physicians and hospitals can bill for additional services that are needed when patients are injured by mistakes. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Structure, process or outcome: which contributes most to patients' overall assessment of healthcare quality? (bmj.com)
  • Research questions The paper explores which type of quality aspects (structure, process, outcome) most strongly determines patients' overall assessment of healthcare, and whether there is a variation between different types of patient groups in this respect. (bmj.com)
  • Discussion Improving process and structure aspects of healthcare is most likely to increase patients' overall evaluation of the quality of care as expressed in a global rating. (bmj.com)
  • 88 (24.7%) teams had initiated pilot testing, with 42 (11.8%) piloting with care providers and 24 (6.7%) with patients. (bmj.com)
  • Dog-assisted activities had some positive effects on health, wellbeing, depression and quality of life for patients with severe cognitive disorders. (diva-portal.org)
  • In order to further explore this qualitative outcome measure, during structured interviews of residents, attending physicians, nurses and patients and their families, specific questions will be used to probe the perceived level of resident professionalism. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cary, M. and Baernholdt, M. and Anderson, R. and Merwin, E., Performance-based Outcomes of Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities Treating Hip Fracture Patients in the United States. (duke.edu)
  • Patients also have a significant stake in outcomes research because it facilitates their decision-making, both in deciding what intervention is best for them given their circumstances, and as members of the public who have ultimately to pay for medical services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending on the type of software used, companies can track health care employee visits to patients, verify payroll, and document patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electronic visit verification (often referred to as EVV) is a method used to verify home healthcare visits to ensure patients are not neglected and to cut down on fraudulently documented home visits. (wikipedia.org)
  • MAST has also a separate domain describing the impact of telemedicine on patient perception and thereby underlining the importance of the patients' view of this type of health care technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Level III-B Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) provides pediatric medical subspecialists and surgical specialists who perform major surgeries for patients with congenital malformations or acquired conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, early studies showed little gain in quality for the money spent, as well as evidence suggesting unintended consequences, like the avoidance of high-risk patients, when payment was linked to outcome improvements. (wikipedia.org)
  • aims
  • Specifically, the mental health plan aims to achieve greater mental health through increased delivery of community-based care and targeted efforts to improve prevention and management of mental disorders as well as improved psychosocial rehabilitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • measures
  • Fifteen showed at least one significant positive effect but in most studied outcome measures there was no significant treatment effect. (diva-portal.org)
  • However, the majority of studied outcome measures showed no significant effect. (diva-portal.org)
  • The main outcome measures were resource use, costs of preventive measures and treatment, and pressure ulcer incidence in both hospitals. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Determining the level of health depends on measures that some argue place disproportionate importance on physical pain or disability over mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the healthcare industry, pay for performance (P4P), also known as "value-based purchasing", is a payment model that offers financial incentives to physicians, hospitals, medical groups, and other healthcare providers for meeting certain performance measures. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2005[update], 75% of all U.S. companies connect at least part of an employee's pay to measures of performance, and in healthcare, over 100 private and federal pilot programs are underway. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, these organizations also express concern over the choice and validity of measurements of improvement, which may include process measures that do not directly tie to outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preventive healthcare (alternately preventive medicine or prophylaxis) consists of measures taken for disease prevention, as opposed to disease treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, these measures are not affordable for every individual and the cost effectiveness of preventive healthcare is still a topic of debate. (wikipedia.org)
  • morbidity
  • An adverse event will be defined as any unplanned injury arising as a consequence of medical care that is associated with morbidity, requires treatment, prolongs hospital stay, or results in disability at discharge. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Newborn
  • This health promotion par excellence is based on the 'new knowledge' in molecular biology, in particular on epigenetic knowledge, which points to how much affective - as well as physical - environment during fetal and newborn life may determine each and every aspect of adult health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centre
  • Also in the UK, the Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare carries out HTA in collaboration with the health service, the NHS and various industrial partners. (wikipedia.org)
  • It consists mainly in providing future parents with pertinent, unbiased information on primal health and supporting them during their child's primal period of life (i.e., "from conception to first anniversary" according to definition by the Primal Health Research Centre, London). (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) bear nearly 90% of the global burden of disease 1 , 2 and yet have severe shortages of trained healthcare providers. (bmj.com)
  • Just as health comprises a variety of physical and mental states, so do disease and disability, which are affected by environmental factors, genetic predisposition, disease agents, and lifestyle choices. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recommended that adults and children aim to visit their doctor for regular check-ups, even if they feel healthy, to perform disease screening, identify risk factors for disease, discuss tips for a healthy and balanced lifestyle, stay up to date with immunizations and boosters, and maintain a good relationship with a healthcare provider. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • In these analyses, the patient-given global rating served as the dependent variable, and experiences regarding structure (waiting times, continuity of care), process (doctor-patient communication and information) and outcome aspects (improvement or worsening of symptoms) served as independent variables. (bmj.com)
  • The patient groups did not differ with respect to the type of quality aspects that most predicted the overall assessment. (bmj.com)
  • A more sophisticated method of patient reported outcome measurement, with pre- and post-treatment questionnaires and the inclusion of quality-of-life criteria, might lead to higher associations between outcome and the overall evaluation of the received care. (bmj.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of eliminating traditional resident work shifts (i.e. greater than 24 hours in length) on patient safety and resident educational outcomes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The primary outcome is the rate of preventable adverse events per 1000 patient days. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For example, the difference in level of direct involvement in patient care activities (writing notes, performing procedures, etc) between the two schedules. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Agency software can be standalone or part of software packages, that include electronic visit verification to track hours of employees and time spent on home visits and patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also widely used by employers of home healthcare providers to verify employee's locations and hours of work as well as document patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Home health care providers that participate in Medicaid are required to report specific data about patient care known as Outcome and Assessment Information Set-C (OASIS-C). Data includes health status, functional status, and support system information. (wikipedia.org)
  • The data is used to establish a measurement of patient home health care options. (wikipedia.org)
  • Home health care software allows health care providers to obtain and transmit such data while on location with a patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • CERTAIN is a network of diverse healthcare providers and organizations participating in continuous evaluation of healthcare delivery and learning to improve patient care. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2014 Dec;20(6):857-64 Renewing Health United4Health Smartcare inCASA Patient@home Durand-Zaleski I, Zarca K, Charrier N, Treluyer L, Calinaud C. Deploying and assessing telemedicine in the Paris region: progress report. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998 - The company completed the acquisition of Healthcare Research Systems, Inc. for its patient experience surveys. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2012, 2013 - The company was named the largest patient satisfaction measurement firm in the U.S. by Modern Healthcare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health professionals must know their audience in order to better serve their patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its aim is to inform the formulation of safe, effective, health policies that are patient focused and seek to achieve best value. (wikipedia.org)
  • telemedicine
  • Model for assessment of telemedicine (MAST) is a framework for assessment of the value of telemedicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Telemedicine services may have many different types of outcomes and can be studied in many ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order for those who develop new telemedicine services to produce the information that healthcare managers need for making decisions on investment in telemedicine, a model for assessment of telemedicine (MAST) was developed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Secondly, after the preceding considerations, the multidisciplinary assessment is carried out in order to describe and assess the different outcomes of the telemedicine application. (wikipedia.org)
  • MAST is the most widely used framework for assessment of telemedicine in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • The model is used in large EU funded telemedicine project like Renewing Health, United4Health, Smartcare and inCASA. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2015). MAST has also been recommended as a usable structure for assessment of outcomes of telemedicine by the association of Danish Regions Telemedicine strategy, by the British Thoracic Society statement on telemedicine (2014) and within the field of wound care by Angel et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • HTA is now also used in assessment of innovative medical technologies like telemedicine e.g. by use of the Model for assessment of telemedicine (MAST). (wikipedia.org)
  • improvements
  • In addition, long-term improvements in health-related quality of life and physical activity levels may result in these ICU survivors once they are back in the community. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • have shown modest improvements in specific outcomes, but these have been short-lived, and reduce performance in outcomes that were not measured. (wikipedia.org)
  • Implementation
  • Current health initiatives include the widespread implementation of a National Health Insurance (NHI) program and further development and implementation of the Belize Health Information System (BHIS). (wikipedia.org)
  • economists
  • Consequently, the field is more multi-disciplinary, involving, in addition to healthcare professionals and the manufacturers of medical devices or pharmaceuticals, medical economists, sociologists, and public health researchers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some argue that there are health states worse than being dead, and that therefore there should be negative values possible on the health spectrum (indeed, some health economists have incorporated negative values into calculations). (wikipedia.org)
  • 1980s
  • The need for improved primary healthcare strategies was recognized during the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biomedical approach to health literacy that became dominant (in the U.S.) during the 1980s and 1990s often depicted individuals as lacking health literacy or "suffering" from low health literacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Objectives
  • The primary objectives of the reform project included increasing access to care, improving quality of care, and ensuring the efficient and equitable delivery of care across both health sectors. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Healthy People 2020 initiative of the United States Department of Health and Human Services has included health literacy as a pressing new topic, with objectives for improving it in the decade to come. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • During World War I, intense efforts to improve the outcomes of care for battle casualties, with careful attention to outcomes led to major advances in orthopedic surgery, plastic surgery, blood transfusion and the prevention of tetanus and gangrene. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCOAP's growth and development was supported through grants from the Life Sciences Discovery Fund, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to investigators in the Department of Surgery at the University of Washington (UW) under principal investigator David Flum, MD, MPH. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strong for Surgery is a public health campaign and quality improvement (QI) initiative launched in Washington State in 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Background Healthcare-focused hackathons are 48-hour platforms intended to accelerate novel medical technology. (bmj.com)
  • Innovative medical technologies are included in one of six essential building blocks of the WHO Health System Framework 3 , 4 and can have particular impact in LMICs. (bmj.com)
  • Link√∂ping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. (diva-portal.org)
  • At 28 weeks, more than 90% of babies can survive outside of the uterus if provided with high-quality medical care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adventist HealthCare Shady Grove Medical Center is a 266-licensed bed acute care facility located in Rockville, Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shady Grove Medical Center's Pediatrics department is staffed with specially-trained pediatricians and pediatric nurses that have both the medical expertise to care for children and the understanding to help children and their families cope emotionally and developmentally to health-care experiences in a positive manner. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shady Grove Medical Center ranks in the top 25% of hospitals nationwide for overall heart attack care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Low health literacy reduces the success of treatment and increases the risk of medical error. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to have a population that understands health terms and can make proper health decisions, the language used by health professionals has to be at a level that others who are not in the medical field can understand. (wikipedia.org)
  • and "a multidisciplinary process that summarises information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology in a systematic, transparent, unbiased, robust manner. (wikipedia.org)
  • This model also penalizes health care providers for poor outcomes, medical errors, or increased costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Services
  • Funded by the US Department of Health & Human Services, the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the Division of AIDS. (actgnetwork.org)
  • Governments can also use home health care software to verify visits from providers who bill them for services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data collection is mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a division of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Department of Health and Human Services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the early nineties, he participated in series of studies on quality of health care services from the patient's perspective at the Netherlands Institute of Primary Health Care (NIVEL) and Maastricht University. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Ministry of Health (MoH) is the government agency responsible for overseeing the entire health sector and is also the largest provider of public health services in Belize. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, similar to the public sector, private health services are offered at a relatively low cost with a shared emphasis on quality of care and quality improvement. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the major accomplishments of the reform project included the establishment of four health regions (northern, central, western, and southern health region) designated to provide health services to distinct geographical areas across Belize. (wikipedia.org)
  • All four health regions offer primary care and secondary care services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only the Central Health Region, which serves the largest population in Belize, offers tertiary care services [see Health care delivery for description of levels of care]. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this time, there was also further expansion of primary care services and an increasing emphasis on mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the MoH launched a strategic mental health plan in 2009 aimed at integrating mental health services into primary care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The change was part of a branding initiative to emphasize the Adventist HealthCare system name and better reflect the facility's broad range of services. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • Preventive healthcare strategies are described as taking place at the primal, primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • They worked at the Harvard and Columbia University Schools of Public Health, respectively, and later expanded the levels to include secondary and tertiary prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • This new way of promoting health is now commonly called primal prevention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary prevention consists of traditional "health promotion" and "specific protection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Findings
  • Findings are published in scientific publications and educational monographs, as well as videotapes that have been distributed to health programs in colleges throughout the United States. (northeastern.edu)
  • Program
  • My research program is concerned with understanding and improving nursing management practices and their impact on outcomes, with a particular interest in resident outcomes in nursing homes. (duke.edu)
  • As a Washington State approved Coordinated Quality Improvement Program, SCOAP's participating hospitals are allowed to disclose protected healthcare information specifically for program purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • National Health Insurance: The goal of developing a national health insurance program grew out of earlier health care reform efforts to provide affordable and accessible quality care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The company focuses on healthcare products and subscription-based solutions (analytics, program, and insights) in the United States and Canada. (wikipedia.org)
  • Framework
  • Anderson, R. A. and Bailey Jr, D. E. and Wu, B. and Corazzini, K. and McConnell, E. S. and Thygeson, N. M. and Docherty, S. L., Adaptive Leadership Framework for Chronic Illness: Framing a Research Agenda for Transforming Care Delivery. (duke.edu)
  • include
  • Prenatal care may include taking extra folic acid, avoiding drugs and alcohol, regular exercise, blood tests, and regular physical examinations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Company's clients include acute and post-acute care providers or other payer organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • A major use of HTAs is in informing reimbursement and coverage decisions, in which case HTAs should include benefit-harm assessment and economic evaluation. (wikipedia.org)
  • qualitative
  • In order to further explore this qualitative outcome measure, during focus groups with nurses specific questions will be used to probe the perceived level of impact on nursing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • involves
  • There are multiple definitions of health literacy, in part, because health literacy involves both the context (or setting) in which health literacy demands are made (e.g., health care, media, internet or fitness facility) and the skills that people bring to that situation (Rudd, Moeykens, & Colton, 1999). (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • This is a Phase II pilot single-blinded randomized controlled trial to be conducted in two adult intensive care units. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A range of approaches to adult education brings health literacy skills to people in traditional classroom settings, as well as where they work and live. (wikipedia.org)
  • economics
  • MATCH is organised into four themes addressing key HTA topics including Health Economics, Tools for Industry, User Needs and Procurement and Supply chain. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990s
  • The first use of home health care software was in the 1990s, with companies making software based on the Omaha system of software. (wikipedia.org)
  • indices
  • OBJECTIVE: In this review, we focus on studies that examined such prognostic indices in relation to predicting a fatal outcome from pancreatitis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • 1972) who suggested the idea of length of life adjusted by indices of functionality or health. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • The off-site maintenance of the cloud system results in a lower cost to the home health agency and provides access to the agency's data from off-site locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The results revealed a number of problems surrounding the health sector and identified key policy areas and priorities for improving the healthcare system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Belize Health Information System: A need for a stronger health information system (HIS) was identified during early health reform efforts (1998) and was realized in 2008 with the introduction of the Belize Health Information System. (wikipedia.org)
  • The BHIS is an integrated comprehensive health information system that allows for the collection and dissemination of population-based and record-based health data with the goal of improving health outcomes and health performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • inform
  • The results of outcomes research are used to inform the decisions of legislative bodies that make decisions related to healthcare, as well as of financial bodies (governments, insurers, employers) who seek to minimize cost and waste while ensuring the provision of an acceptable level of care. (wikipedia.org)