• extracts
  • Curare is a name used to identify a variety of highly toxic (poisonous) extracts from some types of woody vines that grow in South America . (encyclopedia.com)
  • During the nineteenth century, doctors tried to use curare as a muscle relaxant in the treatment of rabies, tetanus (an infectious disease that usually enters the body through a wound), and epilepsy (a chronic, or lasting, disease of the nervous system characterized by convulsions), but these trials were unsuccessful because available curare extracts were not of equal quality and potency (strength). (encyclopedia.com)
  • muscles
  • Curare contains two alkaloids: curine, which paralyzes the muscle fibers of the heart, and curarine, which paralyzes the motor nerve endings in voluntary muscles. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Curare acts at the junction between nerves and muscles and produces complete paralysis of all voluntary movement without having any effect on consciousness. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • make
  • European scientists began studying curare in the late sixteenth century after explorers learned that Indians living along the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers in South America had been using it for centuries to make poison-tipped hunting arrows. (encyclopedia.com)
  • winner of the 1957 Nobel Prize in medicine) of the Pasteur Institute in Paris , France, set out to make a synthetic (artificially produced) uniform curare. (encyclopedia.com)
  • He succeeded in 1947 with the medicine gallamine, and then went on to make more than 400 compounds that had the same effects as curare. (encyclopedia.com)
  • medical
  • The first breakthrough leading to successful medical use of curare came in 1935, when Harold King isolated its active principle, which he called tubocurarine. (encyclopedia.com)