• whole organs
  • Substitution of whole genes or chromosomes, or large portions thereof, for the purpose of genetic therapy or engineering (which is not actually transplantation, since these are not whole organs, or even tissues) is generally not yet feasible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac xenotransplantation (from pig to man), which was studied by Brenner and Reichart since 1997, has reached a preclinical status despite of a higher immunological complexity than allotransplantation due to preexisting and new-built antibodies against whole organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • Supported by the Bavarian Research Foundation (Bayerische Forschungsstiftung, grant 219/96) together with his research team as a consultant of cardiac surgery he investigated the xenogeneic transplantation of multi-transgenic pig hearts as a possible future organ replacement therapy in man since 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesions
  • Covering the full range of conditions, from rashes, to skin lesions and disorders of the hair, nail, and mucosa, Fitzpatrick's is a unique combination of text, clinical reference, and color atlas-one that gives you the best quality and most varied photographs of skin disorders available anywhere. (google.com)
  • Batista Peres LA, Passarini SR, Ferreira de Barros Tocollini Branco M, Kruger LA. Skin lesions in chronic renal dialysis. (springer.com)
  • Covering the full range of conditions, from rashes, to skin lesions and disorders of the hair, nail, and mucosa, Fitzpatrick's is a unique combination of text, clinical reference, and color atlas. (appszoom.com)
  • Skin lesions in adult liver transplant recipients: a study of 100 consecutive patients. (springer.com)
  • The skin lesions are usually purple in color. (wikipedia.org)
  • Localized skin lesions may be treated by surgery, injections of chemotherapy into the lesion, or radiation therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lesions are usually as described above, but may occasionally be plaque-like (often on the soles of the feet) or even involved in skin breakdown with resulting fungating lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skin lesions may be quite disfiguring for the sufferer, and a cause of much psychosocial pathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • grafts
  • George David Pollock FRCS (1817 - 14 February 1897) was a British surgeon, known as a pioneer of skin grafts. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pilot suffered severe burns requiring skin grafts. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, at the time skin grafts were a risky business, often being rejected for unknown reasons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within days the skin grafts from the brother were completely destroyed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Successive skin grafts from the brother were destroyed even faster, a fact that gave them the evidence they needed to implicate the immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through carefully planned experimentation, the trio showed that mice exposed to cells of unrelated mice as fetuses did not reject skin grafts from those same mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hair transplantation differs from skin grafting in that grafts contain almost all of the epidermis and dermis surrounding the hair follicle, and many tiny grafts are transplanted rather than a single strip of skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The grafts are obtained in one or both of the two primary methods of surgical extraction, follicular unit transplantation, colloquially referred to as "strip harvesting", or Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE), in which follicles are transplanted individually. (wikipedia.org)
  • thymus
  • Development of CD4 and CD8 Single Positive T Cells in Human Thymus Organ Culture: IL-7 Promotes Human T Cell Production by Supporting Immature T Cells," Dev. (patentgenius.com)
  • An organ called the thymus is responsible for ensuring that any T-cells that attack self proteins are not allowed to live. (wikipedia.org)
  • lung
  • He is known for his work in the fields of xenotransplantation, the advancement of artificial hearts, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and lung transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • By using an almost unlimited source of porcine organs (heart, kidney, lung, cornea, (liver rather improbably) and cells (pig islet cells) against diabetes, nigrostriatal brain cells against Morbus Parkinson, stem cells, bone/-marrow, skin etc.) not only in Europe, but also worldwide many people could be helped with animal cells or with the replacement of a whole organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • malignancies
  • Although this agent is one of the most successful in the treatment of cancer, it produces major toxicities to normal cells and organs at the concentrations necessary for effective treatment of malignancies. (medscape.com)
  • It also has led to skin abscesses and an infection of the false vocal cord in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies and caused keratitis in a man with no significant medical history. (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular
  • Some printed organs have already reached clinical implementation, and primarily include hollow structures such as the bladder, as well as vascular structures such as urine tubes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organs that have been successfully printed and implemented in a clinical setting are either flat, such as skin, vascular, such as blood vessels, or hollow, such as the bladder. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient's
  • The first insight came when the pair decided to experiment, and grafted part of a wound with the patient's skin, and another part with skin from the patient's brother. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Kuypers D. Skin problems in chronic kidney disease. (springer.com)
  • Chronic and repetitive scratching, picking, or rubbing of the nodules may result in permanent changes to the skin, including nodular lichenification, hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation, and skin thickening. (wikipedia.org)
  • constructs
  • For more complicated organs, such as the heart, smaller constructs such as heart valves have also been the subject of research. (wikipedia.org)
  • extraction
  • These concerns resurfaced in 2001, when a Chinese asylum-seeking doctor testified that he had taken part in organ extraction operations. (wikipedia.org)
  • bladder
  • lesion) Direct immunofluorescence showing intercellular and basement membrane staining Indirect immunofluorescence staining with rat bladder epithelium Microscopy of the skin sample obtained from the biopsy is used to detect the presence of cleavage within the dermis, epidermal acantholysis (breaking apart of the skin), dyskeratotic keratinocytes and vacuolar changes in the layers of the skin, interfacial dermatitis, and epidermal exocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • In 2013, the company Organovo produced a human liver using 3D bioprinting, though it is not suitable for transplantation, and has primarily been used as a medium for drug testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • They consist of four medical breakthroughs: a symbiote that regenerates skin, technology to culture a human liver, another to culture a human heart, and a second symbiote that lives in the bloodstream and grants many benefits: it fights disease, dissolves blood clots, repairs and cleans fatty deposits from the circulatory system, and maintains hormone levels at those of an adult. (wikipedia.org)
  • involuntary
  • Organ donation, however, has met resistance, and involuntary organ donation is illegal under Chinese law, as it is against Chinese tradition and culture, which attach symbolic life affirming importance to the kidney and heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • all crimes are punishable by death, followed by involuntary donation of the perpetrator's transplantable organs (including skin, scalp, and teeth). (wikipedia.org)
  • experimental
  • Since 2004 he worked within the scope of a Transregio Research Group FOR 535 of the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)) and since 2012 as a principal investigator (PI) for the sector of xenogeneic heart transplantation of the Transregio Research Collaborative Research Centre 127 (Transregio-Sonderforschungbereich SFB 127) with the speaker Bruno Reichart in the Walter-Brendel-Center of experimental medicine (WBex). (wikipedia.org)
  • reactions
  • Side effects that are probably hypersensitivity reactions include dizziness, diarrhea, fatigue, and skin rashes. (wikipedia.org)
  • regulation
  • though, under a 1984 regulation, it became legal to remove organs from executed criminals with the prior consent of the criminal or permission of relatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reports of organs being removed from executed prisoners in China for sale internationally had been circulating since the mid-1980s, when a 1984 regulation made it legal to harvest organs from convicted criminals with the consent of the family or if the body goes unclaimed. (wikipedia.org)
  • artificial heart
  • their prognosis (how stable they are now- whether they can survive major invasive surgery and the anesthesia and post-op period, and how they have been, and how they likely will fare with and/or without the organ, versus with other therapies that are not transplantation- such as continued dialysis or getting an artificial heart or left ventricular assist device). (wikipedia.org)
  • Research is currently being conducted on artificial heart, kidney, and liver structures, as well as other major organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • This atlas uses high quality photographs and well written, brief synopses to cover an enormous amount of information about skin diseases. (google.com)
  • This atlas uses high quality photographs and well written, brief synopses to cover an enormous amount of information about skin diseases in one book. (google.com)
  • This atlas combines over 900 color photographs with succinct descriptions of skin diseases and systemic diseases with skin manifestations to create the most useful single reference in the field. (google.com)
  • The British National Eczema Society lists it as a third-line treatment for severe to moderate cases of these skin diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synthetic pharmaceutical drugs with corticosteroid-like effects are used in a variety of conditions, ranging from brain tumors to skin diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A skin biopsy is often performed to exclude other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • In 2007, China issued regulations banning the commercial trading of organs, and the Chinese Medical Association agreed that the organs of prisoners should not be used for transplantation, except for members of the immediate family of the deceased. (wikipedia.org)
  • Estimates for when such organs can be introduced as a viable medical treatment vary. (wikipedia.org)
  • biopsy
  • Initially, samples are obtained via skin biopsy for routine microscopy and direct immunofluorescence (DIF) testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • At the present time, some organs, notably the brain and its constituent lobes and subdivisions, cannot be transplanted, and even if possible (recently, research has been done into the subject), would be very controversial for many. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to the earlier attempts at hand transplantation, the Louisville group had performed extensive basic science research and feasibility studies for many years prior to their first clinical procedure (for example, Shirbacheh et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • grown
  • As the rapid manufacturing techniques entailed by 3D printing become increasingly efficient, their applicability in artificial organ synthesis has grown more evident. (wikipedia.org)