• Rutaceae
  • Over 200 species of plants produce linalool, mainly from the families Lamiaceae (mint and other herbs), Lauraceae (laurels, cinnamon, rosewood), and Rutaceae (citrus fruits), but also birch trees and other plants, from tropical to boreal climate zones, including fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Citrus is a genus of flowering trees and shrubs in the rue family, Rutaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • Some citrus species have been present in the Mediterranean basin for centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • This group of species has reached great importance in some of the Mediterranean countries and, in the case of orange, mandarin and lemon trees, they found here soil and climatic conditions which allows them to achieve a high level of fruit quality, even better than in the regions where they came from. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apart from these four core citrus species, there are Australian limes and the recently discovered Mangshanyegan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phylogenetic analysis suggests the species of Oxanthera from New Caledonia should be transferred to the genus Citrus. (wikipedia.org)
  • navel
  • The tree's survival proved that the citrus industry could thrive in the colder climate of Northern California, encouraging many people to grow oranges in the area around Oroville, although the vast majority produced in the region are of the navel orange variety instead. (wikipedia.org)
  • fruit
  • Hartz Bonanza® Parakeet Orange Citrus Flavor Treat Sticks are a tasty fruit, seed and grain combination your pet bird will love. (hartz.com)
  • A descendant of the domesticated orange, the fruit of the laraha is too bitter and too fibrous to be considered edible. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the trees were then abandoned, the fruit evolved from a bright orange color and sweet taste into the green and inedible bitter laraha. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on its appearance, it was named Tachibana (or Mandarin, an orange citrus fruit). (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 1987[update], orange trees were found to be the most cultivated fruit tree in the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orange trees are widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates for their sweet fruit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The grainy irregular rind of the ripe fruit can range from bright orange to yellow-orange, but frequently retains green patches or, under warm climate conditions, remains entirely green. (wikipedia.org)
  • Citrus fruit has been cultivated in an ever-widening area since ancient times. (wikipedia.org)
  • King Louis XIV of France housed citrus in orangeries, to protect the tropical fruit to be grown in the 1600s France. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may be due to perceived similarities in the smell of citrus leaves and fruit with that of cedar. (wikipedia.org)
  • The large citrus fruit of today evolved originally from small, edible berries over millions of years. (wikipedia.org)
  • subtropical
  • Citrus plants are native to subtropical and tropical regions of Asia and the Malay Archipelago and they were firstly domesticated in these areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • sweet orange
  • The sweet orange has had its full genome sequenced. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is general agreement that the arrival of the sweet orange in Europe was linked with the activities of the Portuguese during the fifteenth century, and particularly by Vasco de Gama's voyages to the East. (wikipedia.org)
  • ancestors
  • James Edward Huse, a crane operator with Bigge construction was chosen to move the Mother Orange in 1964 due to his ancestors involvement in transporting the tree originally. (wikipedia.org)
  • juice
  • Stir in orange juice. (sheknows.com)
  • The orange contains a number of distinct carpels (segments) inside, typically about ten, each delimited by a membrane, and containing many juice-filled vesicles and usually a few seeds (pips). (wikipedia.org)
  • grown
  • In 2014, 70.9 million tonnes of oranges were grown worldwide, with Brazil producing 24% of the world total followed by China and India. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recipe
  • A year after its commercial introduction, S-VC tested multiple variations of the original Gatorade recipe, finally settling on more palatable variants in lemon-lime and orange flavors. (wikipedia.org)
  • natural
  • Her name comes from the natural citrus blossom branch (Azahar in Spanish) which is on the Virgin's hands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some collectors of used stamps have discovered that although not readily removable by water, the self-adhesives can be removed with Bestine (a hexane solvent), Benzine (Petroleum Ether), or a natural based citrus solvent containing d-limonene (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Lepidosaphes beckii also known as purple scale, mussel scale, citrus mussel scale, orange scale, comma scale and mussel purple scale is a scale insect that is a pest of Citrus trees. (wikipedia.org)
  • trees
  • Orange trees generally are grafted. (wikipedia.org)
  • By withholding water and nutrients, and by using pruning techniques, French gardeners were able to make citrus trees bloom throughout the year, to the delight of Louis XIV. (wikipedia.org)
  • From May to October, the orange trees and other trees are exposed in the lower bed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Louis XIV had a love for orange trees and had them potted in solid silver tubs and placed throughout the state rooms of the Palace to perfume the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • These included over 1,000 orange trees from Vaux-le-Vicomte, which were transferred to the Orangerie. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1698 the British Ambassador to France, William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland, reported back to King William III that he had been taken to view the orange trees at Versailles, but compared them unfavorably to William's own collections in Holland. (wikipedia.org)
  • tree
  • The Mother Orange Tree is the oldest living orange tree in Northern California. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two-year-old orange tree, which was a novelty in Northern California at the time, was purchased in 1856 by Judge Joseph Lewis in the city of Sacramento and planted at the western approach to the bridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • The orange tree is an evergreen, flowering tree, with an average height of 9 to 10 m (30 to 33 ft), although some very old specimens can reach 15 m (49 ft). (wikipedia.org)
  • production
  • Shortly after the 1969 Orange Bowl, Robert Cade entered into an agreement providing Stokely-Van Camp, Inc. (S-VC), a canned-food packaging company, with the U.S. rights to production and sale of Gatorade as a commercial product. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2012[update], sweet oranges accounted for approximately 70% of citrus production. (wikipedia.org)