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  • Single
  • Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis in support of plant breeding" by Robert J. Henry, Peter C. Bundock et al. (edu.au)
  • Where in the genome are significant single nucleotide polymorphisms from genome-wide association studies located? (diva-portal.org)
  • Here, we analyzed 2,893 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been identified in 593 published GWAS as associated with a disease phenotype with respect to their genomic location. (diva-portal.org)
  • Microsatellite genotyping and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism-based indices of Plasmodium falciparum diversity within clinical infections. (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • Separately, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from genome-wide short-read sequences of the same samples were used to derive within-isolate fixation indices (F ws), an inverse measure of diversity within each isolate compared to overall local genetic diversity. (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • data
  • The data are consistent with an effect of butacaine on the process by which adenine nucleotides are transported across the mitochondrial inner membrane rather than on the binding of adenine nucleotides to sites on the adenine nucleotide carrier. (biochemj.org)
  • enzymology
  • In enzymology, a nucleotide diphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.9) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction a dinucleotide + H2O ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } 2 mononucleotides Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are dinucleotide and H2O, whereas its product is mononucleotide. (wikipedia.org)
  • In enzymology, a nicotinate-nucleotide adenylyltransferase (EC 2.7.7.18) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction ATP + nicotinate ribonucleotide ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } diphosphate + deamido-NAD+ Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are ATP and nicotinate ribonucleotide, whereas its two products are diphosphate and deamido-NAD+. (wikipedia.org)
  • single nucleotide p
  • A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a variation at a single site in DNA , is the most frequent type of variation in the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • A tag SNP is a representative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP's) in a region of the genome with high linkage disequilibrium (the non-random association of alleles at two or more loci). (wikipedia.org)
  • sequences
  • Found 286450 nucleotide sequences. (nih.gov)
  • The tool works with standard single letter nucleotide or protein codes including ambiguities and can match Prosite patterns in protein sequences. (nih.gov)
  • Nucleotide diversity can be calculated by examining the DNA sequences directly, or may be estimated from molecular marker data, such as Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) data and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) data. (wikipedia.org)
  • Single-nucleotide polymorphisms may fall within coding sequences of genes, non-coding regions of genes, or in the intergenic regions (regions between genes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) is a repository providing free and unrestricted access to annotated DNA and RNA sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (also known as EMBL-Bank) is the section of the ENA which contains high-level genome assembly details, as well as assembled sequences and their functional annotation. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzymes
  • The clinical conditions associated with defects of enzymes catalysing nucleotide degradation provide a valuable insight into the importance of this network. (els.net)
  • Enzymes defective in inborn errors of nucleotide degradation. (els.net)
  • The nucleotide passes through numerous biochemical steps while being processed, adding and removing atoms through the use of numerous enzymes . (bionity.com)
  • This research along with others, which included various types of direct and non-direct labeling via: analogs, addition via enzymes, or other methods made labeling of nucleotides much safer for scientist to study DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • These enzymes transfer a glycosyl group from a sugar nucleotide to an acceptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • receptors
  • Update and subclassification of the P2Y G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors: from molecular mechanisms and pathophysiology to therapy. (springer.com)
  • In The P2 Nucleotide Receptors, leading researchers from major laboratories around the world summarize our current knowledge of the molecular biology, the physiology, and the pharmacology of the P2 receptors. (springer.com)
  • Their authoritative contributions cover the major aspects of these receptors, describing the relationships between the physiological and pharmacological effects of ATP and other nucleotides and the various cloned P2 receptors, as well as providing an historical perspective and discussing current issues of nomenclature. (springer.com)
  • reactions
  • Uracil also recycles itself to form nucleotides by undergoing a series of phophoribosyltransferase reactions. (conservapedia.com)
  • In addition, nucleotides participate in cell signaling (cGMP and cAMP), and are incorporated into important cofactors of enzymatic reactions (e.g. coenzyme A, FAD, FMN, NAD, and NADP+). (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleotides undergo breakdown such that useful parts can be reused in synthesis reactions to create new nucleotides. (wikipedia.org)
  • The recent discovery of the reversibility of many glycosyltransferase-catalyzed reactions calls into question the designation of sugar nucleotides as 'activated' donors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genome
  • Is anyone interested in trying some new fluorescent nucleotide analogs for fluorescence in situ hybridization, point mutation analysis or genome mapping? (bio.net)
  • plural /snɪps/), is a variation in a single nucleotide that occurs at a specific position in the genome, where each variation is present to some appreciable degree within a population (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1%). For example, at a specific base position in the human genome, the C nucleotide may appear in most individuals, but in a minority of individuals, the position is occupied by an A. This means that there is an SNP at this specific position, and the two possible nucleotide variations - C or A - are said to be alleles for this position. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleotide sequence being generated from whole genome sequencing projects at varying stages of assembly, including complete contigs and annotated, fully assembled sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • The ubiquitous presence of nucleotides from viruses and bacteria to humans reflects a common base and unity among all living organisms despite the remarkable diversity of life. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Humans express seven known NPP isoforms, some of which prefer nucleotide substrates, some of which prefer phospholipid substrates, and others of which prefer substrates that have not yet been determined. (wikipedia.org)
  • glycosyltransferases
  • The development of chemoenzymatic strategies to generate large libraries of non-native sugar nucleotides has enabled a process referred to as glycorandomization where these sugar nucleotide libraries serve as donors for permissive glycosyltransferases to afford differential glycosylation of a wide range of pharmaceuticals and complex natural product-based leads. (wikipedia.org)
  • fluorescent
  • They are reactive with N-Hydroxysuccinimide ester group which helps attach a fluorescent dye to the primary amino group on the nucleotide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using aminoallyl nucleotides as indirect fluorescent labeling seemed to nullify the sensitivity issues seen in cyanine-labeling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although direct labeling of dNTP is the quickest and cheapest method of fluorescent labeling, it is disadvantageous as the sequence allows for only one modified nucleotide for use. (wikipedia.org)
  • diversity
  • Nucleotide diversity is a concept in molecular genetics which is used to measure the degree of polymorphism within a population. (wikipedia.org)
  • One commonly used measure of nucleotide diversity was first introduced by Nei and Li in 1979. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nucleotide diversity is a measure of genetic variation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arlequin3 software can be used for calculations of nucleotide diversity and a variety of other statistical tests for intra-population and inter-population analyses. (wikipedia.org)
  • N-nucleotides, or nontemplated nucleotides are believed to exist only to create diversity at V(D)J junctions (see V(D)J recombination) during lymphocyte development. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon
  • In any one strand, the chemical orientation (directionality) of the chain-joins runs from the 5'-end to the 3'-end (read: 5 prime-end to 3 prime-end)-referring to the five carbon sites on sugar molecules in adjacent nucleotides. (wikipedia.org)